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AP’s legendary ‘Napalm Girl’ photographer Nick Ut to retire

  • FILE - In this Tuesday, April 19, 2011 photo, Associated Press Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Nick Ut poses for a photo in Los Angeles. Ut will be retiring from the AP in March 2017 after 51 years of taking photographs from the front lines of the Vietnam War to the red carpets of Hollywood. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel) Richard Vogel

  • FILE - In this 1973 file photo, Phan Thi Kim Phuc, left, is visited by Associated Press photographer Nick Ut at her home in Trang Bang, Vietnam. As a 9-year-old, Kim Phuc was the subject of a Pulitzer Prize-winning photo by Ut as she fled in pain from a misdirected napalm attack against her village by South Vietnamese planes in 1972. After taking the photograph, Ut came to the girl's aid and transported her to a hospital. (AP Photo) Uncredited

  • AP photographer Nick Ut (left) and Phan Thi Kim Phuc. AP file

  • FILE - In this June 8, 1972 file photo taken by Associated Press photographer Huynh Cong "Nick" Ut, a Skyraider, a propeller driven plane of the Vietnamese Airforce (VNAF) 518th Squadron, drops a bomb with incendiary napalm and white phosphorus jelly over Trang Bang village. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File) Nick Ut

  • FILE - In this June 8, 1972 file photo, vombs with a mixture of napalm and white phosphorus jelly dropped by Vietnamese AF Skyraider bombers explode across Route-1, amidst homes and in front of the Cao Dai temple in the outskirts of Trang Bang, Vietnam. In the foreground are Vietnamese soldiers and journalists from various international news organizations. The towers of the Trang Bang Cao Dai temple are visible in the centre of the explosions. (AP Photo/Nick Ut) Nick Ut

  • FILE - In this June 8, 1972 file photo taken by Huynh Cong "Nick' Ut, South Vietnamese forces follow terrified children, including 9-year-old Kim Phuc, center, as they run down Route 1 near Trang Bang after an aerial napalm attack on suspected Viet Cong hiding places. After making the photo, he set aside his camera, gave the badly burned girl water, poured more on her wounds, then loaded her and others into his AP van to take them to a hospital. When doctors refused to admit her, saying she was too badly burned to be saved, he angrily flashed his press pass. The next day, he told them, pictures of her would be displayed all over the world, along with an explanation of how the hospital refused to help. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File) Nick Ut


Tuesday, March 14, 2017

The Associated Press’s Nick Ut retires later this month after 51 years of taking photographs from the front lines of the Vietnam War to the red carpets of Hollywood.

Ut, who won the 1973 Pulitzer Prize for his photo of a burning little girl fleeing a napalm bomb attack on her village, will take his final pictures for the AP at the end of this month.

It will conclude a career Ut says took him from hell to Hollywood as he photographed everything from people killed in battle to celebrities getting stars on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame.

Ut was 21 when he took the famous photo of Kim Phuc fleeing her burning village. After taking her picture, he rushed the terrified 9-year-old to a hospital. The two remain friends.

Associated Press