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Fourth Great Dane dies since being removed from Christina Fay’s home

  • Christina Fey (center) of Wolfeboro appears in District Court with her attorney Kent Barker at the Carroll County Superior Courthouse in Ossipee on Sept. 6, 2017. Fay was charged in June with abusing 84 Great Danes. (ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff) ELIZABETH FRANTZ

  • The Humane Society of the United States works with the Wolfeboro Police Dept. to rescue approximately 70 Great Danes from a suspected puppy mill on Friday, June 16, 2017, in Wolfeboro, N.H. (Meredith Lee/The HSUS) Meredith Lee

  • The Humane Society of the United States works with the Wolfeboro Police Dept. to rescue approximately 70 Great Danes from a suspected puppy mill on Friday, June 16, 2017, in Wolfeboro, N.H. (Meredith Lee/The HSUS) Meredith Lee


Monitor staff
Saturday, November 11, 2017

Another Great Dane taken from the Wolfeboro mansion of Christina Fay died while in the care of the Humane Society of the United States, her lawyers said.

Fay’s trial on animal cruelty charges began last month after more than 75 dogs were taken from her home during a police raid in June.

Fay has maintained she took good care of the dogs, but prosecutors say her home was covered in filth and the dogs were suffering and neglected.

The fourth dog to die since being removed from Fay’s care was identified by the court only as “D1,” and died Wednesday, one of her lawyers, Jim Cowles, announced.

“The cause of the death was not provided by the state,” Cowles said in a statement. “The state mistakenly believed him to be 3 years old, however, D1 was only 15 months old when he died under HSUS’ care.”

Fay has argued the dogs were “seized, not rescued” by law enforcement and should be placed in homes of her choosing while the case against her proceeds. A judge denied her request last month to rehome the dogs.

“The dogs remain the defendant’s property under law,” Fay’s attorneys argued in their motion to have the dogs placed in the care of her choosing, “and she did not consent to the Humane Society of the United States scheduling or performing surgery on her dogs.”

State law says property can be seized by officers executing a search warrant, and must be kept safely “under the direction of the court or justice so long as necessary to permit them to be produced or used as evidence in any trial.”

Fay has pleaded not guilty to the animal cruelty charges. The sixth day of her trial, which has been delayed for two weeks, will resume Tuesday.