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Flatware a little ... flat? Find a set that really shines

  • Mepra's Due cutlery in matte gold. (MUST CREDIT: The Mine)

  • “Everyone thinks they have to register for the fanciest, most elegant tabletop when they’re putting together their registries,” said Darcy Miller, celebrations expert and editor. Food52 via the Washington Post

  • Mepra’s Fantasia collection. (MUST CREDIT: Food52) Food52—The Washington Post

  • Oslo cutlery set. (MUST CREDIT: Salt & Sundry) Salt & Sundry—The Washington Post



Washington Post
Friday, February 23, 2018

Most often, shopping for flatware must be done in person. The right fork, knife and spoon will feel right in your hand and look right to your eye – it’s a highly personal choice.

“If you can, always go to the store,” sid Mat Sanders, co-founder with Brandon Quattrone of Consort, an interiors firm with retail outposts in New York and L.A. “Hold it, feel it, make sure you connect with it kinesthetically,” he explains. If you can’t go to the store, “just order one set and make sure it’s right for you before you make a full order.”

Whether you’re registering for a first set of silverware or wanting to finally find that perfect set that complements your table and your personality, we have tips from a vintage flatware hunter, the editor of a home design magazine, interior designers and a shop owner who scours the market for the best of the best.

“Everyone thinks they have to register for the fanciest, most elegant tabletop when they’re putting together their registries,” said Darcy Miller, celebrations expert and editor at large for Martha Stewart Weddings. “However, think about how you live your life, the kind of gatherings and celebrations that you like to throw and attend, and build your collection around that.”

Sanders and Quattrone are “huge on Crate & Barrel’s Emerge Mirror set for its simplicity and its weighted handle, which gives it a more elevated feel,” Sanders said ($39.95 for a five-piece place setting, crateandbarrel.com). “Clean, simple lines with a timeless feel are our go-tos. We’re not too big on overembellished or super-decorated pieces.” Bonus tip: Don’t skimp on the forks – make sure they have pointy ends, because cheaper forks can have disappointingly dull ends.

A longtime thrifter and self-proclaimed hoarder, New York designer Eddie Ross has a thing for flatware. He likes to hunt for his favorite vintage patterns on Replacements.com, but he doesn’t worry about getting a complete set.