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GOP leaders now backing Moore, despite allegations

  • President Donald Trump speaks before hosting a lunch with Senate Republicans in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) AP

  • Former Alabama chief justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at a rally, in Fairhope, Ala., in September. AP file

  • FILE - In this Nov. 28, 2017, file photo, Alabama U.S. Senatorial candidate Doug Jones talks with the media after touring the Northport Medical Center, in Northport, Ala. Jones is the democratic candidate facing republican Roy Moore for Alabama's U.S. Senate seat in the Dec. 12 special election. (Vasha Hunt/AL.com via AP, File) Vasha Hunt

  • Christopher Cox, founder of Bikers For Trump, speaks at a rally for Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore at Jackson County Courthouse Square in Scottsboro, Ala., Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017. (Bob Gathany/AL.com via AP) Bob Gathany

  • Bikers For Trump hold a rally for Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore at Jackson County Courthouse Square in Scottsboro, Ala., Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017. (Bob Gathany/AL.com via AP) Bob Gathany

  • In this May 30, 2000 photo, Thomas Blanton, left, a suspect in the 1963 bombing of the 16th St. Baptist Church in Birmingham Ala., is released on bond from the Jefferson County Jail in Birmingham Ala. Now the Democratic nominee, Doug Jones is touting a record that includes the prosecutions of Bobby Frank Cherry and another one-time Klansman, Blanton, as he asks voters in Republican-run Alabama to turn on GOP nominee Roy Moore and give him a try. ( Charles Nesbitt/The Birmingham News via AP) Charles Nesbitt



Associated Press
Tuesday, December 05, 2017

Republican leaders in Washington are coming to grips with the possibility – perhaps even probability – that Alabama’s Roy Moore will win his special election next Tuesday and join them in the capital.

Looking past allegations of sexual misconduct with Alabama teenagers, President Donald Trump formally endorsed Moore, and the Republican National Committee quickly followed suit, transferring $170,000 to the Alabama Republican Party to bolster Moore’s candidacy.

“I think he’s going to do very well. We don’t want to have a liberal Democrat in Alabama, believe me,” Trump said Tuesday during a lunch with Republican senators. “We want strong borders, we want stopping crime, we want to have the things that we represent and we certainly don’t want to have a liberal Democrat that’s controlled by Nancy Pelosi and controlled by Chuck Schumer, we don’t want to have that for Alabama.”

Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell, who once called on Moore to get out of the race, changed his rhetoric over the weekend to say that it was Alabama voters who should decide.

The changed tone – and Trump’s decision to do away with any facade of distancing himself from the race – make it clear they are increasingly confident in Moore’s chances of victory despite the continued unease of some other Republicans.

The special election is next Tuesday for the seat once held by Jeff Sessions, now the U.S. attorney general. Although the polls have showed a narrowing contest with Democrat Doug Jones, Alabama is a strongly Republican state and Democrats generally have little chance there.

A Moore victory would set up a potential clash with fellow Republicans in Congress, some of whom have resoundingly called on him to quit the race. While some have softened their rhetoric recently, others have said they still will try to expel him if he is elected.

An RNC official confirmed late Monday that the committee would once again be supporting Moore after severing its fundraising ties to his campaign last month. On Tuesday, the official said the RNC had made two transfers to the state party: one for $50,000 and another for $120,000.

The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the official was not authorized to discuss the transfers by name.

Trump’s former chief strategist Steve Bannon, Breitbart’s executive chairman, attended a rally with Moore Tuesday evening.

Buoyed by the taste of his own success in Congress as the Republican tax bill inches closer to passage, Trump telephoned Moore on Monday to offer encouragement as well as support and also argued in a pair of tweets that Moore’s vote was badly needed to push the president’s policies forward.

Weeks ago, when accusations of sexual misconduct with teenagers first surfaced, Trump’s spokesman had said the president believed Moore would “do the right thing and step aside” if the allegations were true.

Top Republicans had vowed to expel him from the Senate if he wins. Publicly and privately, GOP leaders described the allegations against Moore as credible and insisted there were no circumstances under which he should serve in the Senate.

Moore’s campaign was wounded by accusations this fall of sexual misconduct, decades ago, made by women who were then teenagers. One of the women alleges he initiated sexual contact when she was 14.

Moore has denied the allegations, saying “I do not know any of these women. I did not date any of these women I did not engage in any sexual misconduct with anyone.”

Trump, who has repeatedly noted Moore’s denials, took a more political stance on Monday.

“Democrats refusal to give even one vote for massive Tax Cuts is why we need Republican Roy Moore to win in Alabama,” Trump tweeted. “We need his vote on stopping crime, illegal immigration, Border Wall, Military, Pro Life, V.A., Judges 2nd Amendment and more.”

In that same vein, longtime Alabama Sen. Richard Shelby said Trump’s endorsement didn’t surprise him. He said of the president, “I think he’s interested, a lot of us are, in the numbers, being a Republican.”

And Sen. Orrin Hatch, who traveled with Trump on Monday to Hatch’s home state of Utah, said he realistically didn’t have any choice. Hatch said of Moore, “That’s the only Republican you can possibly get down there at this time.”

Trump first appeared to back Moore after his first choice, Sen. Luther Strange, lost the GOP primary for the seat once held by Attorney General Jeff Sessions. But the president went silent after the Washington Post reported on the allegations of sexual misconduct with two teens, ages 14 and 16, and efforts to date several others while Moore was a local prosecutor in his 30s.

By late last month, however, with pressure mounting from Bannon and other corners of his base, Trump was making clear that he preferred Moore, raising doubts about the candidate’s accusers and criticizing Democrat Jones as the “liberal puppet” of Democratic leaders Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi.

Jones sidestepped questions about Trump’s endorsement while suggesting the support of national Republicans like McConnell could do more harm than good in Alabama.

“Our campaign is going straight to the people of the Alabama because that’s who my voters are. It’s not the president, it’s not Mitch McConnell,” Jones told reporters outside a steel mill in suburban Birmingham. “Obviously Mitch McConnell has very little credibility in this state anyway, so I’m not worried about him at all.”

Expelling a senator is no easy task. The Senate Ethics Committee would have to investigate, and a recommendation of expulsion could take years.