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Great Dane owner’s request to get dogs back under her control delayed

  • The Humane Society of the United States works with the Wolfeboro Police Dept. to rescue more than 80 Great Danes from a suspected puppy mill on Friday, June 16, 2017, in Wolfeboro, N.H. (Meredith Lee/The HSUS) Meredith Lee

  • The Humane Society of the United States works with the Wolfeboro Police Dept. to rescue approximately 70 Great Danes from a suspected puppy mill on Friday, June 16, 2017, in Wolfeboro, N.H. (Meredith Lee/The HSUS) Meredith Lee

  • The Humane Society of the United States Animal Rescue Team members John Sidenstricker and John Peaveler, right, load dogs during a rescue of approximately 70 Great Danes from a suspected puppy mill on Friday, June 16, 2017, in Wolfeboro, N.H. The Wolfeboro Police Dept. called in The HSUS to assist with rescue and long-term care of the dogs. (Meredith Lee/The HSUS) Meredith Lee

  • Senior Field Rescue Responder for The Humane Society of the United States Rowdy Shaw removes a dog from the house during a rescue of approximately 70 Great Danes from a suspected puppy mill on Friday, June 16, 2017, in Wolfeboro, N.H. The Wolfeboro Police Dept. called in The HSUS to assist with rescue and long-term care of the dogs. (Meredith Lee/The HSUS) Meredith Lee

  • The Humane Society of the United States works with the Wolfeboro Police Dept. to rescue more than 80 Great Danes from a suspected puppy mill on Friday, June 16, 2017, in Wolfeboro, N.H. (Meredith Lee/The HSUS) Meredith Lee


Staff and wire reports
Thursday, August 31, 2017

A judge has declined to issue a ruling on a New Hampshire woman’s request to have control over care for more than 80 Great Danes that were seized from her home.

Christina Fay of Wolfeboro was charged in June with two counts of animal cruelty after authorities said they found the dogs living in filth and suffering from sores, infections and other health problems.

Fay pleaded not guilty and has filed an injunction requesting that the state stop allowing surgeries on the dogs, which remain under the control of the Humane Society of the United States.

Earlier this month, Fay claimed the dogs were “seized, not rescued” by law enforcement and should be placed in homes of her choosing while the case against her proceeds.

“The dogs remain the defendant’s property under law,” Fay’s attorneys argued in a motion filed earlier this month, “and she did not consent to the Humane Society of the United States scheduling or performing surgery on her dogs.”

Attorney Kent Barker of Nashua requested that the dogs be moved to homes where people have experience caring for this type of breed.

In Ossipee’s Superior Court on Wednesday, Judge Amy Ignatius declined to make a decision in the matter, pending Fay’s criminal case in district court. A hearing in that case has been scheduled for Sept. 6.