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Bears make an appearance in Penacook yard

  • Kathy and Ed Bush saw a young black bear climb a tree in their Penacook yard with no sign of the mother bear at first. To be safe, they called the police, then they took some photos and video as the mother bear eventually showed up and called the cub down. The pair of bears lumbered across the yard, across the street and down an embankment toward the Merrimack River. Courtesy—

  • Kathy and Ed Bush saw a young black bear climb a tree in their Penacook yard with no sign of the mother bear at first. To be safe, they called the police, then they took some photos and video as the mother bear eventually showed up and called the cub down. The pair of bears lumbered across the yard, across the street and down an embankment toward the Merrimack River. Courtesy—

  • Kathy and Ed Bush saw a young black bear climb a tree in their Penacook yard with no sign of the mother bear at first. To be safe, they called the police, then they took some photos and video as the mother bear eventually showed up and called the cub down. The pair of bears lumbered across the yard, across the street and down an embankment toward the Merrimack River. Courtesy—

  • Kathy and Ed Bush saw a young black bear climb a tree in their Penacook yard with no sign of the mother bear at first. To be safe, they called the police, then they took some photos and video as the mother bear eventually showed up and called the cub down. The pair of bears lumbered across the yard, across the street and down an embankment toward the Merrimack River. Courtesy—



Monitor staff
Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Kathy and Ed Bush awoke to a strange sound resonating from the backyard of their Penacook home Monday morning.

“Wrow, wrow,” it called in a medium-pitch gurgle.

Kathy couldn’t quite place it.

“I was thinking more of a bird, like, ‘What kind of unusual bird is making that unusual sound?’ ” Kathy recalled later that day.

So Kathy and Ed walked out to investigate, and they found a young black bear climbing a tree in their yard, no sign of its mother nearby.

“I didn’t think it was a bear at first,” Kathy said.

But a bear it was, “scampering and playing” on trees in their yard.

The couple called the police about 5:30 a.m. as Ed shot video of he cub from below.

An officer quickly responded and spotted the mother bear in the backyard, Kathy said.

Ed and Kathy went back into the house – with Ed taking pictures from the back porch and Kathy from inside – and the officer went into his cruiser to monitor the situation, Kathy said.

The mother bear called the cub down from the tree, but it scampered up another one. The pair eventually lumbered through the yard, across the street and down an embankment toward the Merrimack River. Another neighbor reported seeing the mother bear with three cubs.

The New Hampshire Fish and Game Department advises people to make bears aware of their presence by clapping, talking or singing.

“If you get too close to a bear, it may slap the ground, huff, blow and chomp its teeth or rush you in an attempt to get you to move a more comfortable distance away,” NHFG advises. “If this occurs, maintain eye contact with the bear, speak in a soft, calm voice and slowly back away from the bear.”

Mother bears are rarely aggressive toward humans, but they are very protective of their cubs, Fish and Game warns: “A mother bear will usually give many warning signs (huffing or popping sounds, swatting the ground or even bluff charges) to let you know that you are too close.”

(Jonathan Van Fleet contributed to this report.)