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Heat wave leads to record temps in Concord, across northeast

  • Chris Kennedy (left) and Jay Archibald work through Wednesday’s high temperatures to lay down cobblestones for the overrun ramp at the center of the new roundabout at Exit 16 in Concord on Sept. 27, 2017. (ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff) Elizabeth Frantz—Monitor staff

  • Chris Kennedy lays down cobblestones for the overrun ramp at the center of the new roundabout at Exit 16 in Concord on Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017. (ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff) Elizabeth Frantz—Monitor staff

  • In this Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017 photo Quincy Andrews, left, and Josh Fournier, both of Meredith, N.H., arrive at dawn at the summit of Mount Washington, N.H., where a water fountain awaits visitors to New England’s highest peak. The weather observatory on the summit recorded a record daily temperature high Sunday when the mercury hit 65 degrees, the highest ever for a Sept. 24. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty) Robert F. Bukaty


Staff and wire reports
Wednesday, September 27, 2017

What a difference 70 years makes. The late September weather in Concord back in 1947 was unusually frigid – so cold in fact that the temperature on Sept. 27 was a record low of 22 degrees.

The temperature on Sept. 27, 2017 was a different story. Concord topped out at 90 degrees Wednesday, beating the record for the day by 2 degrees, which was set back in 1933.

Likewise, Manchester set a record with 89-degree temperatures Wednesday, beating the record of 86 degrees set in 2007.

A high pressure system trapping hot air over northern New England led to days of record warmth. On Sunday, the mercury climbed to 91 degrees in Concord and in Burlington, Vt., both records for the date. The average high temperature for this time of year is in the 60s, according to the National Weather Service.

The hot weather helped Mount Washington set record-high temperatures for four consecutive days.

It reached 67 degrees Tuesday at the highest peak in the Northeast, the warmest Sept. 26 on record. Wednesday was cooler with a high of 63, which was still record-setting by a single degree. Tuesday was the hottest day this year recorded at the 6,288-foot New Hampshire summit, where it was snowing just a few weeks earlier.

Weather observers say the heat is associated with a persistent ridge over the eastern United States and recent hurricanes that pushed the jet stream north.

Thursday should be warmer than usual, but somewhat cloudy, making record temperatures unlikely, said Metorologist Michael Cempa of the National Weather Service in Gray, Maine.

Friday and the weekend should see more seasonable temperatures in the 60s, followed by warmer temperatures next week, but “not quite this hot,” Cempa said.