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High winds blow tractor trailers off 93 in Franconia Notch

  • Victory Barrett of Chichester wipes off the snow off of her truck outside Loudon Elementary School on Monday. GEOFF FORESTER / Monitor staff

  • School Street in Loudon is covered with snow and ice on Monday morning, April 16, 2018 after an overnight storm brought mixed precipitation around the region. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • N.H. State Police closed a section of Interstate 93 through Franconia Notch due to hazardous wind conditions. Three tractor-trailers rolled over due to high winds, including one that landed on a cruiser in the breakdown lane. Courtesy of N.H. State Police

  • N.H. State Police closed a section of Interstate 93 through Franconia Notch due to hazardous wind conditions. Three tractor trailers rolled over due to high winds, including one that landed on a cruiser in the breakdown lane.

  • N.H. State Police closed a section of Interstate 93 through Franconia Notch due to hazardous wind conditions. Three tractor trailers rolled over due to high winds, including one that landed on a cruiser in the breakdown lane.


Monitor staff
Tuesday, April 17, 2018

A powerful storm that brought historic April snowfall to the upper Midwest and the Great Lakes made an unwelcome pass over New Hampshire on Sunday and Monday, dropping everything from snow to sleet to rain.

“It’s pretty late in the year for this sort of storm. It’s not unprecedented but certainly rare,” National Weather Service Meterologist Michael Cempa said Monday.

Traffic was slow-going across sections of central and southern New Hampshire for much of the day. No major road closures or serious car crashes were reported in the Concord area as a result of the storm, said Bill Boynton, chief communications officer for the state’s Department of Transportation.

However, high winds blew three tractor-trailers off Interstate 93 through Franconia Notch, leading to the highway’s closure, Boynton said. One of the tractor trailers landed on a New Hampshire State Police cruiser with a trooper inside, he said. Neither the trooper nor the truck driver was injured.

“It’s been a whole mixed bag of winter weather, everything from freezing rain to snow to high winds that have kept us busy,” Boynton said.

In addition to the crashes, the storm resulted in downed trees, wires and road closures elsewhere in the state, including in Bath, Keene, Langdon, Marlborough and Swanzey.

The cold front that made way for the frozen storm moved into the Northeast on Saturday. That coupled with high pressure to the north and east were the perfect ingredients for Monday’s somewhat unpredictable storm. The type of precipitation was hard to predict and varied greatly depending on location, Cempa said.

Schools across the region reported two-hour delays this morning. In Loudon, students prepared to go in late and then learned the district had decided to cancel school all together.

By Monday afternoon, temperatures throughout the region were above freezing although rain showers – heavy at times – continued. The rain is forecasted to taper off Monday night and skies are expected to brighten by Tuesday morning.

There will be a slow warm up this week with the possibility of 60-degree temperatures toward the end of the weekend. But meterologists predicted that another system will hit the Northeast on Thursday.

While it looks like rain for most of central New Hampshire, there is a chance of snow in the mountains, Cempa said.