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Official says Vegas hotel didn’t immediately report gunfire

  • FILE - In this Monday, Oct. 9, 2017 file photo, Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo discusses the Route 91 Harvest festival mass shooting at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department headquarters in Las Vegas. On Monday, Lombardo said Paddock shot and wounded the security guard outside his door and opened fire through his door around 9:59 p.m. - six minutes before shooting into the crowd. That was a different account from the one police gave last week: that Paddock shot the guard, Jesus Campos, after unleashing his barrage of fire on the crowd. (Erik Verduzco/Las Vegas Review-Journal via AP, File) Erik Verduzco

  • FILE - This undated file photo provided by Eric Paddock shows his brother, Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock. Police initially said Stephen Paddock stopped firing on the music festival concert crowd below to shoot through his door and wound a Mandalay Bay security guard who was outside. On Monday, Oct. 9, 2017, they said the guard actually was wounded before Paddock started the massacre. (Courtesy of Eric Paddock via AP, File)

  • Ginger Slocum, grandmother of shooting victim Paige Gasper, attends a news conference, Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2017, in Las Vegas. Gasper was injured in the mass shooting at a country music festival October 1. (AP Photo/John Locher) John Locher

  • Heather Selken, mother of shooting victim Paige Gasper, attends a news conference, Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2017, in Las Vegas. Gasper was injured in the mass shooting at a country music festival October 1. (AP Photo/John Locher) John Locher

  • FILE - In this Oct. 4, 2017 file photo, a little-known device called a "bump stock" is attached to a semi-automatic rifle at the Gun Vault store and shooting range in South Jordan, Utah. New federal rules would be the "the smartest, quickest" way to regulate the device the gunman in the Las Vegas massacre used to heighten his firepower, House Speaker Paul Ryan said Wednesday, Oct. 11 in remarks that suggested Congress was unlikely to act first. It remains unclear, however, what if any action the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives will take on so-called bump stocks. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer) Rick Bowmer

  • Las Vegas shooting victim Kurt Fowler embraces his 10-year-old daughter Timori Fowler during a country music performance at Sunrise Hospital, Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2017, in Las Vegas. Kurt Fowler was shot in the mass shooting at a music festival in Las Vegas.(AP Photo/John Locher) John Locher

  • FILE - In this Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017 file photo, police officers stand at the scene of a mass shooting near the Mandalay Bay resort and casino on the Las Vegas Strip, in Las Vegas. A revised chronology given by investigators for the Las Vegas massacre is intensifying pressure for police to explain how quickly they responded to what would become the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. (AP Photo/John Locher, File) John Locher

  • FILE - In this Monday, Oct. 9, 2017 file photo, people pray at a makeshift memorial for victims of a mass shooting in Las Vegas. Gunman Stephen Paddock opened fire Sunday, Oct. 1 from a room at the Mandalay Bay resort and casino, on an outdoor country music concert killing dozens and injuring hundreds. A revised chronology given by investigators for the Las Vegas massacre is intensifying pressure for police to explain how quickly they responded to what would become the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. (AP Photo/John Locher, File) John Locher

  • FILE - In this Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017 file photo, police officers stand along the Las Vegas Strip near the Mandalay Bay resort and casino during a shooting at a country music festival, in Las Vegas. Police initially said Stephen Paddock stopped firing on the music festival concert crowd below to shoot through his door and wound a Mandalay Bay security guard who was outside. On Monday, Oct. 9, 2017, they said the guard actually was wounded before Paddock started the massacre. (AP Photo/John Locher, File) John Locher



Associated Press
Friday, October 13, 2017

Mandalay Bay hotel officials didn’t notify police about a shooting in a hallway inside the high-rise until after Stephen Paddock opened fire on the crowd outside at a country music festival, a federal official told the Associated Press on Thursday.

The disclosure means there may have been a delay of some six minutes in summoning police to the scene of what became the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

The official was briefed by law enforcement but wasn’t authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

In the most recent chronology given by investigators, Paddock fired 200 rounds into the hallway on the 32nd floor, wounding an unarmed security guard in the leg, six minutes before he unleashed his barrage of bullets on the festival crowd. He killed 58 people and injured nearly 500.

Over the past few days, Las Vegas police and the Mandalay Bay’s corporate parent, MGM Resorts International, would not answer questions about whether the hotel informed police about the hallway shooting in the minutes before the massacre began.

MGM has said the chronology given by police is inaccurate, but it hasn’t said what is wrong about it.

Paddock began his 10-minute attack on the crowd at 10:05 p.m., firing off more than 1,000 rounds, police said. Police didn’t arrive on the 32nd floor until 10:17 p.m., two minutes after he had stopped shooting.

The timeline given by police earlier this week differed dramatically from the one they gave last week: that Paddock shot through his door and wounded the guard, Jesus Campos, after he had opened fire on the crowd.

“These people that were killed and injured deserve to have those six minutes to protect them,” said Chad Pinkerton, an attorney for Paige Gasper, a California college student who was shot under the arm in the attack. “We lost those six minutes.”

But Ron Hosko, a former FBI assistant director who has worked on SWAT teams, said the six minutes wouldn’t have been enough time for officers to stop the attack.