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Poached eels: U.S. strikes at illegal harvests as value grows

  • In this May 25, 2017 photo, baby eels swim plastic bag after being caught near Brewer, Maine. During springtime eel runs up Maine rivers a the handful of legal eel fishermen search for them at night, armed with nets. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty) Robert F. Bukaty

  • The baby eels are tiny at the time of harvest, weighing only a few grams when they are scooped with dip-nets or trapped with larger nets that resemble small soccer goals. AP

  • CORRECTS TO REMOVE REFERENCE THAT EELS ARE USED IN SUSHI - In this May 25, 2017 photo, baby eels swim in a bucket after being caught near Brewer, Maine. Changes in the worldwide fisheries industry have turned live baby American eels into a commodity that can fetch more than 2,000 a pound at the dock, but the big demand and big prices have spawned a black market that wildlife officials say is jeopardizing the species. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty) Robert F. Bukaty

  • Licensed eel fishermen Jessica Card (left) and Julie Keene shine flashlights into the water on the banks of the Penobscot River after setting a net in Brewer, Maine. AP

  • CORRECTS TO REMOVE REFERENCE THAT ELVERS ARE USED IN SUSHI - In this May 25, 2017 photo, licensed eel fishermen Julie Keene and Jessica Card set up a fyke net on the banks of the Penobscot River after setting a net in Brewer, Maine. In the springtime baby eels, also known as elvers, swim upstream with the rising tide. Elvers often are sold to Asian aquaculture companies to be raised to maturity and sold to the lucrative Japanese eel restaurant market. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty) Robert F. Bukaty

  • In this May 25, 2017 photo, an eel fisherman shines a flashlight into the water on the Penobscot River in Brewer, Maine. The illegal trade in poached eels has become so widespread that the U.S. Justice Department has launched an undercover investigation on the East Coast called Operation Broken Glass. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty) Robert F. Bukaty

  • In this Thursday, July 20, 2017 photo, chef Masa Miyake prepares to clean and cook eels at his Japanese restaurant, in Portland, Maine. Miyake is one of a growing number of restaurants that serve Maine farm-raised eels. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty) Robert F. Bukaty

  • In this Thursday, July 20, 2017 photo, a dish of eel nigiri is served at Miyake, a Japanese restaurant, in Portland, Maine. Miyake is one of a growing number of restaurants that serve Maine farm-raised eels. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty) Robert F. Bukaty



Associated Press
Monday, August 07, 2017

Changes in the worldwide fisheries industry have turned live baby American eels into a commodity that can fetch more than $2,000 a pound at the dock, but the big demand and big prices have spawned a black market that wildlife officials say is jeopardizing the species.

Law enforcement authorities have launched a crackdown on unlicensed eel fishermen and illicit sales along the East Coast.

Although not a well-known seafood item like the Maine lobster, wriggling baby eels, or elvers, are a fishery worth many millions of dollars. Elvers often are sold to Asian aquaculture companies to be raised to maturity and sold to the lucrative Japanese restaurant market, where they mainly are served grilled.

But licensed U.S. fishermen complain poaching has become widespread, as prices have climbed in recent years. In response, the U.S. Department of Justice, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other agencies are investigating clandestine harvesting and sales.

Operation Broken Glass, a reference to the eels’ glassy skin, has resulted in 15 guilty pleas for illegal trafficking of about $4 million worth of elvers. Two people are under indictment, and more indictments are expected.

In Maine, more than 400 licensed fishermen make their living fishing for elvers in rivers such as the Penobscot in Brewer and the Passagassawakeag in Belfast every spring. They say law enforcement is vital to protecting the eels and the volatile industry.

Randy Bushey of Steuben, Maine, has been fishing for elvers since 1993. He said he saw his income balloon from as little as $5,000 per year in the 1990s to more than $350,000 in 2012. He said tighter quotas mean he’s earning less these days, and in the most recent season he made about $57,000.

“I’ve seen the best, and I’ve seen the worst,” Steuben said. “I want to see it preserved. I want to see it straightened out.”

The elvers are legally harvested in the U.S. only in Maine and South Carolina. The American eel fishery was typically worth $1 million to $3 million per year until 2011, when the economics of the industry changed. Asian and European eel stocks dried up, and the value of American eels grew to more than $40 million in 2012 because of demand in China, South Korea and other Asian countries.

Investigators also turned their eyes to poaching in 2011, the Department of Justice told the Associated Press. The investigation of people who catch, sell or export elvers illegally has ranged from Maine to South Carolina; a New York seafood distributor was among those netted.

In one case, federal prosecutors said, three men pleaded guilty in November 2016 to trafficking more than $740,000 worth of elvers harvested illegally from the Cooper River in the Charleston, S.C., area.

Investigators go undercover to track poachers, posing as people illegally fishing for elvers. They also follow eel migrations, hoping to catch illegal fishermen on the spot. Investigators also track catch records, which are required by states, to look for possible illegal fishing and selling along the supply chain.

The legwork is necessary because illegal trade in elvers jeopardizes the species’ long-term sustainability, said JeffreyWood, acting assistant attorney general with the Department of Justice’s environmental division.