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Editorial Archive: The death of Martin Luther King

  • King


Friday, June 08, 2018

(The following editorial appeared in the Saturday, April 6, 1968, edition of the “Concord Daily Monitor.”)

We live with death each day but some days it is harder to take than on other days. Thursday was such a day. 

The deliberate, senseless assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, exponent of Christian nonviolence and equality of rights for all men, left a sick feeling in the souls of all who are rational. 

Here was a man, not yet 40 years old, who had won a place in history many times over as a natural leader of American Negroes. He contributed greatly to advancement of civil rights, in law and in practice, while stressing nonviolent methods of advocacy.

Nobody knew better than Dr. King that the goal he sought was far from won, however. He was identified with efforts to eliminate racial intolerance but his vision was greater than that. He understood that Christian morality had not been won in America in all its aspects. 

Dr. King was an articulate man, a man who could be inspirational, and that largely explained his attainment of leadership. He was a fearless man. He expected attempts upon his life, but did not give up his crusade.

An America perplexed by the multiplicity of its problems as it prepares for a national election and seeks to extricate itself from a stalemated war, has been violently reminded of its internal human stresses and strains. 

It is once more prodded into realization that too much hate remains abroad in this land of freedom, that there are too many irrational members of our society, and that our public authorities must forever guard against such acts as the slaying of prominent figures, up to and including a president. 

Once again the ready access Americans have to weapons of destruction is emphasized – a problem about which our government has done virtually nothing. Instead, in city after city, Americans are arming against possible riots, which is an invitation to strife and a step toward anarchy.