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Trump threatens new sanctions after North Korea fires ICBM

  • In this photo provided by South Korea Defense Ministry, South Korea's Hyunmoo II missile is fired during an exercise at an undisclosed location in South Korea, Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017. After 2 ½ months of relative peace, North Korea launched its most powerful weapon yet early Wednesday, claiming a new type of intercontinental ballistic missile that some observers believe could put Washington and the entire eastern U.S. seaboard within range. A rattled Seoul responded by almost immediately launching three of its own missiles in a show of force. (South Korea Defense Ministry via AP)

  • This image made from video of a news bulletin aired by North Korea's KRT on Nov. 29, 2017, shows an image of North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un signing what is said to be a document on Nov. 28, 2017, authorizing a missile test. After two and a half months of relative peace, North Korea launched its most powerful weapon yet early Wednesday, claiming a new type of intercontinental ballistic missile that some observers believe could put Washington and the entire eastern U.S. seaboard within range. Independent journalists were not given access to cover the event depicted in this photo. (KRT via AP Video)

  • Visitors look at a map of North Korean towns at the unification observatory in Paju, South Korea, Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017. After 2 ½ months of relative peace, North Korea launched its most powerful weapon yet early Wednesday, claiming a new type of intercontinental ballistic missile that some observers believe could put Washington and the entire eastern U.S. seaboard within range. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon) Ahn Young-joon

  • A North Korean military guard outpost, top, with its flag is seen from Paju, South Korea, Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017. After 2 ½ months of relative peace, North Korea launched its most powerful weapon yet early Wednesday, claiming a new type of intercontinental ballistic missile that some observers believe could put Washington and the entire eastern U.S. seaboard within range. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon) Ahn Young-joon

  • Visitors watch the North side from the unification observatory in Paju, South Korea, Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017. After 2 ½ months of relative peace, North Korea launched its most powerful weapon yet early Wednesday, claiming a new type of intercontinental ballistic missile that some observers believe could put Washington and the entire eastern U.S. seaboard within range. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon) Ahn Young-joon

  • A man stands in front of a huge screen showing TV news program reporting North Korea's missile launch, in Tokyo, Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017. After 2 ½ months of relative peace, Wednesday’s launch of what the North called the Hwasong-15 intercontinental ballistic missile demonstrated a greater range than other weapons it’s tested and showcased several capabilities the North must master if it were ever to actually try to unleash its missiles at the United States.The Japanese letters on top reads: "Missile luanch." (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi) Shizuo Kambayashi

  • South Korean soldiers walk by a TV screen showing the live broadcast about North Korea's missile launch, at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017. After 2 ½ months of relative peace, North Korea launched its most powerful weapon yet early Wednesday, claiming a new type of intercontinental ballistic missile that some observers believe could put Washington and the entire eastern U.S. seaboard within range. The letters on TV read: "North, Important announcement." (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man) Lee Jin-man

  • A man walks past a TV screen broadcasting news of North Korea's missile launch, in Tokyo, Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017. After 2 ½ months of relative peace, North Korea launched its most powerful weapon yet early Wednesday, a presumed intercontinental ballistic missile that could put Washington and the entire eastern U.S. seaboard within range. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi) Shizuo Kambayashi

  • A man walks past a TV screen broadcasting news of North Korea's missile launch, in Tokyo, Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017. After 2 ½ months of relative peace, North Korea launched its most powerful weapon yet early Wednesday, a presumed intercontinental ballistic missile that could put Washington and the entire eastern U.S. seaboard within range. The letters at bottom read "It is a situation that we will handle." (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi) Shizuo Kambayashi

  • South Korean army's K-55 self-propelled howitzers move during a military exercises in Paju, South Korea, near the border with North Korea, Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017. After 2 ½ months of relative peace, North Korea launched its most powerful weapon yet early Wednesday, a presumed intercontinental ballistic missile that could put Washington and the entire eastern U.S. seaboard within range. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon) Ahn Young-joon

  • People watch the news broadcast announcing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's order to test-fire the newly developed inter-continental ballistic missile Hwasong-15, Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017, at the Pyongyang Train Station in Pyongyang, North Korea. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin) Photographer: Gerry Broome

  • People cheer as they watch the news broadcast announcing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's order to test-fire the newly developed inter-continental ballistic missile Hwasong-15, Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017, at the Pyongyang Train Station in Pyongyang, North Korea. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin) Photographer: Gerry Broome

  • People watch the news broadcast displaying North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's signed order to test-fire the newly developed inter-continental ballistic missile Hwasong-15, Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017, at the Pyongyang Train Station in Pyongyang, North Korea. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin) Photographer: Gerry Broome



Associated Press
Wednesday, November 29, 2017

The Trump administration threatened new sanctions on North Korea on Wednesday after the reclusive government shattered 2½ months of relative quiet with its most powerful weapon test yet, an intercontinental ballistic missile that some observers believe could reach Washington and the entire U.S. Eastern Seaboard.

President Donald Trump tweeted that he spoke with Chinese President Xi Jinping about Pyongyang’s “provocative actions,” and he vowed that “additional major sanctions will be imposed on North Korea today. This situation will be handled!” Trump’s top diplomat, Rex Tillerson, said the U.S. could target financial institutions doing business with the North.

The fresh deliberations about new forms of punishment for North Korea came after its government said it successfully fired a “significantly more” powerful, nuclear-capable ICBM it called the Hwasong-15. Outside governments and analysts concurred the North had made a jump in missile capability.

A resumption of Pyongyang’s torrid testing pace in pursuit of its goal of a viable arsenal of nuclear-tipped missiles that can hit the U.S. mainland had been widely expected. But the power of the missile and suddenness of the test jolted the Korean Peninsula and Washington. The launch at 3:17 a.m. Wednesday local time – early Tuesday afternoon in the U.S. capital – indicated an effort to perfect the element of surprise and obtain maximum attention in the U.S.

In a government statement released through state media, North Korea said the Hwasong-15, the “greatest ICBM,” could be armed with a “super-large heavy nuclear warhead” and is capable of striking the “whole mainland” of the U.S. The North said the missile reached a height of 2,780 miles and traveled 590 miles before accurately hitting a sea target, similar to the flight data announced by South Korea’s military.

After the launch, Pyongyang said leader Kim Jong Un “declared with pride” that his country has achieved its goal of becoming a “rocket power.” State TV said Kim gave the order Tuesday, and it broadcast a photo of Kim’s signed order where he wrote: “Test launch is approved. Taking place at the daybreak of Nov. 29! Fire with courage for the party and country!”