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US commemorates 9/11; ceremony begins at ground zero

  • The National September 11 Memorial and Museum are set for a memorial service, Monday, Sept. 11, 2017, in New York. Thousands of 9/11 victims' relatives, survivors, rescuers and others are expected to gather Monday at the World Trade Center to remember the deadliest terror attack on American soil. Nearly 3,000 people died when hijacked planes slammed into the trade center, the Pentagon and a field near Shanksville, Pa., on Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) Mark Lennihan

  • The podium awaits the arrival of President Donald Trump as a U.S. flag is unfurled at the Pentagon on the 16th anniversary of the September 11th attacks Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) Jacquelyn Martin

  • President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump stand for a moment of silence to mark the anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, on the South Lawn of the White House, Monday, Sept. 11, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) Evan Vucci

  • Paul Murdoch, Architect, Flight 93 National Memorial listens to the "Soundbraking" after ringing the C-4 chime at the future site of the Tower of Voices Flight 93 National Memorial, Shanksville, Pa. Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. (Todd Berkey/The Tribune-Democrat via AP) Todd Berkey

  • Candles in memory of the passengers and crew of United Flight 93, are carried to the Wall of Names at the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pa., Saturday, Sept. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Fred Vuich) Fred Vuich

  • A park ranger stands in front of the Wall of Names at the United Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pa., Saturday, Sept. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Fred Vuich) Fred Vuich

  • A man pays his respects at the Wall of Names at the United Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pa., Saturday, Sept. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Fred Vuich) Fred Vuich

  • This undated artist rendering provided by bioLINIA and Paul Murdoch Architects via that National Park Service shows a depiction of the completed Tower of Voices that will be part of the Flight 93 National Memorial. The 16th anniversary of United Flight 93’s crash into a Pennsylvania field during the 9/11 terrorist attacks will mark the beginning of the end of a 46 million effort to transform the rural Pennsylvania crash site into a national memorial park. Ground was broken Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017, on the final element of the memorial. The tower to be built near the park’s entrance will feature 40 tubular metal wind chimes, one each for the 33 passengers and seven crew members who died. (bioLINIA and Paul Murdoch Architects via AP)

  • National Guard Staff Sgt. Sean Ruth (center) mourns the loss of his father, Army Chief Warrant Officer William Ruth, who died in the 9/11 attack on the Pentagon, while at the September 11th Pentagon Memorial. AP

  • West Virginia National Guard Staff Sgt. Sean Ruth, right, mourns the loss of his father, Army Chief Warrant Officer 4 William Ruth, who died in the September 11 attack on the Pentagon, while at the September 11th Pentagon Memorial on the 16th anniversary at the Pentagon, Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. He was visiting with his family including his daughter Ayslynn Ruth, 4. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) Jacquelyn Martin

  • New York City firefighters with Ladder 10 Engine 10 firehouse salute during a moment of silence, Monday, Sept. 11, 2017, at the World Trade Center in New York. Thousands of 9/11 victims' relatives, survivors, rescuers and others gathered Monday at the World Trade Center to remember the deadliest terror attack on American soil. During the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, 343 firefighters were killed. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) Mark Lennihan

  • New York City firefighters with Ladder 10 Engine 10 firehouse salute during a moment of silence, Monday, Sept. 11, 2017, at the World Trade Center in New York. Thousands of 9/11 victims' relatives, survivors, rescuers and others gathered Monday at the World Trade Center to remember the deadliest terror attack on American soil. During the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, 343 firefighters were killed. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) Mark Lennihan



Associated Press
Monday, September 11, 2017

Holding photos and reading names of loved ones lost 16 years ago, 9/11 victims’ relatives marked the anniversary of the attacks at ground zero on Monday with a solemn and personal ceremony.

Every Sept. 11 since the date of the deadliest terror attack on American soil, Rob Fazio has come to the place where his father, Ronald Carl Fazio, and thousands of others died.

“I’ll come every year for the rest of my life,” the son said. “It’s where I get my strength.”

Thousands of family members, survivors, rescuers others gathered for the hours-long reading of victims’ names at the World Trade Center, while President Donald Trump spoke at the Pentagon and Vice President Mike Pence addressed an observance at the Flight 93 National Memorial near Shanksville, Pa. Nearly 3,000 people were killed when terrorist-piloted planes hit those three sites, hurling America into a new consciousness of the threat of global terrorism.

Some victims’ family members said they couldn’t believe 16 years had passed since a tragedy that “still feels like yesterday,” as Corina La Touche put it while honoring her father, Jeffrey La Touche, at the ground zero gathering.

To others, it was an occasion to thank first responders and members of the military, to express concern for those affected by Hurricane Irma as it continued its destructive path as a tropical storm, or to plead for a return to the sense of unity they felt after the attacks.

“Our country came together that day. And it did not matter what color you were, or where you were from,” said a tearful Magaly Lemagne, who lost her brother, Port Authority of New York and New Jersey police Officer David Lemagne. She implored people to “stop for a moment and remember all the people who gave their lives that day.

“Maybe then we can put away our disagreements and become one country again.”

Trump, a native New Yorker observing the anniversary for the first time as the nation’s leader, said the nation grieves for the people “who were murdered by terrorists” 16 years ago.

Speaking at the Pentagon, the Republican president issued a warning to extremists, saying “America cannot be intimidated.”

When America is united, “no force on earth can break us apart,” he said.

At the Flight 93 National memorial, Vice President Mike Pence said the Flight 93 passengers who revolted against hijackers might well have saved his own life.

The Republican VP was a member of Congress on 9/11, and the Capitol was a possible target of the terrorist piloting Flight 93. Instead, it crashed near Shanksville after the passengers took action. Thirty-three passengers and seven crew members were killed.

“It does feel good to know you have other people who are feeling the same pain that you’re in,” Marvaline Monroe said as she headed into the ceremony to remember her brother, Keith Broomfield. She comes to the ceremony as often as she can.

“It’s very hard. We’ll never forget, but we just have to live with the memories that we have of him.”

Delaney Colaio read names in honor of the three relatives she lost: her father, Mark Colaio, and her uncles Stephen Colaio and Thomas Pedicini. She is making a documentary about the children who lost parents in the attacks.

“I stand here as a reminder to the other families of 9/11 and to the world,” she said, “that no matter how dark moments life can get, there is light ahead if you just choose hope.”