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Accused Wolfeboro Great Dane owner wants dogs back under her control

  • The house in Wolfeboro where 84 Great Danes were discovered as part of a raid carried out Friday. Investigators say the dogs were living in squalid conditions.The owner of the house–Christina Fay–was arrested and charged with two misdemeanor counts of animal neglect. She will be arraigned in August.

  • The Humane Society of the United States Animal Rescue Team members John Sidenstricker and John Peaveler, right, load dogs during a rescue in mid-June. Christina Fay, left, was arrested.

  • The Humane Society of the United States works with the Wolfeboro Police Dept. to rescue approximately 70 Great Danes from a suspected puppy mill on Friday, June 16, 2017, in Wolfeboro, N.H. (Meredith Lee/The HSUS)

  • In mid-June, 75 Great Danes were found in a Wolfeboro home. Courtesy

  • The Humane Society of the United States works with the Wolfeboro Police Dept. to rescue approximately 70 Great Danes from a suspected puppy mill on Friday, June 16, 2017, in Wolfeboro, N.H. (Meredith Lee/The HSUS)

  • Senior Field Rescue Responder for The Humane Society of the United States Rowdy Shaw removes a dog from the house during a rescue of approximately 70 Great Danes from a suspected puppy mill on Friday, June 16, 2017, in Wolfeboro, N.H. The Wolfeboro Police Dept. called in The HSUS to assist with rescue and long-term care of the dogs. (Meredith Lee/The HSUS)



Monitor staff
Friday, August 11, 2017

Christina Fay, the Wolfeboro woman charged in June with abusing 75 Great Danes found in her home, claims the dogs were “seized, not rescued” by law enforcement, her attorney said.

She wants prosecutors to prove why the dogs should be kept from her and has asked a judge to order a stop to any further surgeries from being performed on them.

“The dogs remain the defendant’s property under law,” court documents say in a motion filed Thursday, “and she did not consent to the Humane Society of the United States scheduling or performing surgery on her dogs.”

Kent Barker of Nashua, who’s representing Fay, has filed pleadings requesting that the dogs be moved to homes where people have experience caring for this type of breed.

“She has a list of homes that dogs could be placed in,” Barker said by phone Friday. “All homes that are good homes that could be investigated and checked out by the state.”

Prosecutors object to the dogs being moved, saying they “are being held as evidence in the case.”

In addition, Barker said he learned this week that six of the Great Danes have undergone eye surgery, which he claimed should have been discussed with Fay beforehand. He also speculated that the disease known as cherry eye might have been inherited rather than caused by neglect.

“We were not told ahead of time,” Barker said, referring to the surgeries. “The dogs remain her property.”

Fay was arrested June 16 after officials were tipped off about unsanitary conditions at her Wolfeboro home, a $1.5 million mansion that sits behind a locked gate.

Wolfeboro police and representatives from the Humane Society of the United States, flown here from their headquarters in Maryland, found walls and floors covered with feces and urine, and maggots spilling from the refrigerator.

Veterinarians later noted a long list of illnesses that the dogs were suffering from, including blindness, skin infections, contagious diseases, cuts and malnutrition.

Fay was charged with two misdemeanor counts of cruelty to animals, and Wolfeboro police Chief Dean Rondeau has said more charges are expected, which was confirmed in the paperwork filed Thursday.

But Barker said he’s received no official documentation from a medical professional detailing the dogs’ conditions, nor has he been told where the dogs are or what charges may soon surface, information he said he needs to prepare his case.

“We have not even got the final version of the charges yet is what my understanding is,” Barker said. “We don’t know where the dogs are, we don’t know what kind of shape they’re in, we don’t know what the state is alleging what was wrong with the dogs that supports the animal cruelty charge.”

Barker also said that media reports have not told the whole story.

“There’s been so much venom directed at her that has not been supported by real facts,” Barker said. “Is the whole story out there? Absolutely not.”