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Celebrate sustainable living, state’s natural resources on Saturday

  • Kirsten Bornkessel, left, and Audrey Smith, both 7, look at Scarlett, a 4-year-old red-tailed hawk owned by Rita Tulloh, during Discover WILD New Hampshire Day at the grounds of the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department in Concord on Saturday, April 17, 2010. <br/><br/>(Concord Monitor photo/Max Bittle)<br/>

    Kirsten Bornkessel, left, and Audrey Smith, both 7, look at Scarlett, a 4-year-old red-tailed hawk owned by Rita Tulloh, during Discover WILD New Hampshire Day at the grounds of the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department in Concord on Saturday, April 17, 2010.

    (Concord Monitor photo/Max Bittle)

  • Let's Go Fishing instructor Mark Foley helps Michael McLaughlin, 3, with his cast while fishing for plastic fish during Discover WILD New Hampshire Day in on Saturday, April 17, 2010. Instructors at the event also taught fly fishing techniques, fish identification and how to fillet fish. <br/><br/>(Concord Monitor photo/Max Bittle)<br/>

    Let's Go Fishing instructor Mark Foley helps Michael McLaughlin, 3, with his cast while fishing for plastic fish during Discover WILD New Hampshire Day in on Saturday, April 17, 2010. Instructors at the event also taught fly fishing techniques, fish identification and how to fillet fish.

    (Concord Monitor photo/Max Bittle)

  • Kirsten Bornkessel, left, and Audrey Smith, both 7, look at Scarlett, a 4-year-old red-tailed hawk owned by Rita Tulloh, during Discover WILD New Hampshire Day at the grounds of the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department in Concord on Saturday, April 17, 2010. <br/><br/>(Concord Monitor photo/Max Bittle)<br/>
  • Let's Go Fishing instructor Mark Foley helps Michael McLaughlin, 3, with his cast while fishing for plastic fish during Discover WILD New Hampshire Day in on Saturday, April 17, 2010. Instructors at the event also taught fly fishing techniques, fish identification and how to fillet fish. <br/><br/>(Concord Monitor photo/Max Bittle)<br/>

A quarter century ago, the three R’s were something you did in school, a hybrid was a kind of plant and windmills were rustic farm staples.

Those words have different connotations today, and it’s due in large part to Earth Day awareness campaigns like Discover WILD New Hampshire Day, a free outdoor festival set for Saturday. The event will be a daylong celebration of the great outdoors and is co-sponsored by the state Fish and Game Department and the Department of Environmental Services.

“(The event) is to inform people about how to recreate outside,” said Mark Beauchesne, a Fish and Game spokesman. “But also to inform them about environmental impacts and what these agencies and organizations are doing to ensure people’s quality of life here in New Hampshire when it comes to clean water, healthy air, clean beaches.”

This is the 24th year for the event, which is coordinated each year to mark Earth Day, which is April 22.

“People are definitely more aware (now),” Beauchesne

said. “Whether it’s through commuting or making the right decisions on purchases for motor vehicles or, you name it, everybody’s done something different to make a difference in this world. But most importantly, they are enjoying it. They are getting outdoors and they’re enjoying life outdoors. And that’s really what this is all about.”

As for the event itself, the day will be loaded with exhibitions of retriever dogs in action, big trout and trained falcons. There will also be hands-on demonstrations about how people can conserve energy and protect the environment. One such demonstration, Beauchesne said, will illustrate the effects of what happens when you put oil down a drain instead of disposing of it properly.

“It could potentially end up in our water supply or fishes down the river,” Beauchesne said. “So there are take-home messages in that regard, in regards to being responsible. . . . Because we all live downstream, that’s what they say. Whether you are a recycler or not, everybody needs clean water.”

Kids will also be able to try their hands at a slew of outdoor activities such as archery, casting and wildlife crafts. Visitors will also be able to enjoy turkey calling for kids, a live animal presentation by the Squam Lakes Natural Science Center, a discussion on landscaping for wildlife, a mobile DES Air Quality Monitoring Station, and a map and compass instruction.

The event will also host more than 35 outdoor, conservation and environmental groups from across the state, chock-a-block stocked with information on how to care for the environment and get connected to the outdoors.

The event takes place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, is free, happens rain or shine and is on the grounds of the Fish and Game Department at 11 Hazen Drive in Concord. A food concession is available from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. No dogs are allowed at the event, with the exception of service animals. For information, visit wildnh.com. The Fish and Game license office will be open during the event.

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