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Picturing 2013: the Monitor’s year in Photos

  • Concord Monitor's 2013 in Pictures<br/><br/>(Monitor staff)

    Concord Monitor's 2013 in Pictures

    (Monitor staff)

  • When the Boston bombings happened in April, we knew there would be local implications. Boston is the big city, just an hour away. Many people in our community made frantic phone calls to loved ones who were there that day, including one Concord father, Jeff Bauman. One of the most devastating images that came from that day of chaos was Jeff's oldest son and namesake, Jeff, being wheeled down the street after suffering serious injuries from one of the blasts. Weeks later, reporter Kathleen Ronyane and I were invited to visit Jeff at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston. The family was exercising appropriate privacy when it came to the media, but the Monitor is dad's hometown paper and he wanted his community to know how his son was doing. He trusted us to do that. During the interview, friends that were next to the younger Jeff when the bombs went off came from their own recovery rooms down the hall to visit, one friend with her adorable grandmother Mary Perra. As soon as they walked in, Jeff lit up. Mary was quick with affection and embraces in a way that made the whole room warm. It was clear that the people around Jeff, making support and love a priority, were instrumental to his recovery. That's the kind of story we love to tell. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    When the Boston bombings happened in April, we knew there would be local implications. Boston is the big city, just an hour away. Many people in our community made frantic phone calls to loved ones who were there that day, including one Concord father, Jeff Bauman. One of the most devastating images that came from that day of chaos was Jeff's oldest son and namesake, Jeff, being wheeled down the street after suffering serious injuries from one of the blasts. Weeks later, reporter Kathleen Ronyane and I were invited to visit Jeff at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston. The family was exercising appropriate privacy when it came to the media, but the Monitor is dad's hometown paper and he wanted his community to know how his son was doing. He trusted us to do that. During the interview, friends that were next to the younger Jeff when the bombs went off came from their own recovery rooms down the hall to visit, one friend with her adorable grandmother Mary Perra. As soon as they walked in, Jeff lit up. Mary was quick with affection and embraces in a way that made the whole room warm. It was clear that the people around Jeff, making support and love a priority, were instrumental to his recovery. That's the kind of story we love to tell.

    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • My favorite photos and experiences through life are those unexpected moments amidst an otherwise quiet scene. This popular swimming spot in the North Country is on the Upper Ammonoosuc River near the base of Mount Washington. I've been working on a personal project, a visual letter, about a magical area around the White Mountains. It's a place that has captivated me my entire life as I found myself moving around the country. Being a photojournalist for a daily community newspaper means constantly looking in at other people's lives and working to gain a stranger's trust to tell their story and do it justice. But many times, exploring other people's lives creates a void where I find myself continually probing the question, What is it I'm doing and why am I doing it? Today's climate in the newspaper industry is no secret and the forecast isn't very promising either. But personal projects are necessary for finding a voice and continually pushing for some sort of truth or understanding about the world around us. Being a photographer on New Hampshire's backroads, especially in the north, provides liberation from the workplace and an opportunity for exploration of self and surroundings.<br/><br/><br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

    My favorite photos and experiences through life are those unexpected moments amidst an otherwise quiet scene. This popular swimming spot in the North Country is on the Upper Ammonoosuc River near the base of Mount Washington. I've been working on a personal project, a visual letter, about a magical area around the White Mountains. It's a place that has captivated me my entire life as I found myself moving around the country. Being a photojournalist for a daily community newspaper means constantly looking in at other people's lives and working to gain a stranger's trust to tell their story and do it justice. But many times, exploring other people's lives creates a void where I find myself continually probing the question, What is it I'm doing and why am I doing it? Today's climate in the newspaper industry is no secret and the forecast isn't very promising either. But personal projects are necessary for finding a voice and continually pushing for some sort of truth or understanding about the world around us. Being a photographer on New Hampshire's backroads, especially in the north, provides liberation from the workplace and an opportunity for exploration of self and surroundings.


    (JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

  • Most photojournalists will tell you that their favorite part of the job is getting to explore worlds and lives they otherwise would not. In my eight months at the Monitor, I met some amazing people. I spent time with the John-Stark/Hopkinton High School Robotics team, Oz-Ram. It was an amazing group of students, teachers and parents who spent six weeks to build a robot from scratch that would be able to throw frisbees and climb a pyramid, then competed with teams all around the world. Team leaders Will Renauld, a Hopkinton teacher, and Jeff Beltramo, an NHTI professor, have created a team where any student, not just those interested in engineering, has a place. It could be on the spirit team making signs and costumes, or the build team or even web design. It was so cool to watch this group of students come together to reach their goal, the positivity and the team work was admirable.<br/><br/><br/>(SAMANTHA GORESH / Winter 2013 intern)

    Most photojournalists will tell you that their favorite part of the job is getting to explore worlds and lives they otherwise would not. In my eight months at the Monitor, I met some amazing people. I spent time with the John-Stark/Hopkinton High School Robotics team, Oz-Ram. It was an amazing group of students, teachers and parents who spent six weeks to build a robot from scratch that would be able to throw frisbees and climb a pyramid, then competed with teams all around the world. Team leaders Will Renauld, a Hopkinton teacher, and Jeff Beltramo, an NHTI professor, have created a team where any student, not just those interested in engineering, has a place. It could be on the spirit team making signs and costumes, or the build team or even web design. It was so cool to watch this group of students come together to reach their goal, the positivity and the team work was admirable.


    (SAMANTHA GORESH / Winter 2013 intern)

  • Reporter Sarah Palermo and I spent a day with Tammy Boucher, a Pembroke woman who was nominated by her husband as a mother worth profiling for a Mother's Day story, and her family as they went about their routines. In May, that included a daily visit to Tammy's father Roy Annis, right, at Pleasant View Retirement Home in Concord. Her kids, Cove, 10, and Cheyenne, 15, came along to visit their "pop-pop."  His health had been slipping for months, a combination of dementia and other ailments. He was having what Tammy called "a bad day." While Tammy circled the floor of the home looking for some of her father's favorite snacks to help his waning appetite, Cheyenne took her grandfather's hand to try and talk to him. She searched his face for reactions while telling him about her day and school. It was a quiet, emotional moment for me seeing this young girl handle the reality of the situation so gracefully and compassionately, just like her mother taught her. To me, the photograph shows the strength of a bond and the fragility of life.  It was real. We heard from Tammy a few days later that her father had passed away. She was so grateful for the photographs of this day, despite it having a few low moments. I am grateful to the Bouchers for their generosity of time and spirit, as well as reminding me that documenting life, both the mundane and the ceremonial, means something to someone. <br/><br/><br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    Reporter Sarah Palermo and I spent a day with Tammy Boucher, a Pembroke woman who was nominated by her husband as a mother worth profiling for a Mother's Day story, and her family as they went about their routines. In May, that included a daily visit to Tammy's father Roy Annis, right, at Pleasant View Retirement Home in Concord. Her kids, Cove, 10, and Cheyenne, 15, came along to visit their "pop-pop." His health had been slipping for months, a combination of dementia and other ailments. He was having what Tammy called "a bad day." While Tammy circled the floor of the home looking for some of her father's favorite snacks to help his waning appetite, Cheyenne took her grandfather's hand to try and talk to him. She searched his face for reactions while telling him about her day and school. It was a quiet, emotional moment for me seeing this young girl handle the reality of the situation so gracefully and compassionately, just like her mother taught her. To me, the photograph shows the strength of a bond and the fragility of life. It was real. We heard from Tammy a few days later that her father had passed away. She was so grateful for the photographs of this day, despite it having a few low moments. I am grateful to the Bouchers for their generosity of time and spirit, as well as reminding me that documenting life, both the mundane and the ceremonial, means something to someone.



    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • This portrait was taken when Ms. Irene Butter came to Concord to speak about her experiences surviving the Holocaust to Concord High School students. I wanted to make a picture that wasn't just a photograph of Ms. Butter speaking at a podium, although that would have been the easy way to finish the assignment. When Reporter Kathleen Ronayne let me know that she was interviewing Ms. Butter at The Centennial Hotel after her talk, I followed along to see if there was a picture. The hotel had a dining room with gorgeous window light, and Ms. Butter was kind enough to allow me to take more photographs of her before her next engagement. It's a picture that reminds me to look for different pictures at assignments. <br/><br/>(<br/>TAEHOON KIM / Summer 2013 intern)

    This portrait was taken when Ms. Irene Butter came to Concord to speak about her experiences surviving the Holocaust to Concord High School students. I wanted to make a picture that wasn't just a photograph of Ms. Butter speaking at a podium, although that would have been the easy way to finish the assignment. When Reporter Kathleen Ronayne let me know that she was interviewing Ms. Butter at The Centennial Hotel after her talk, I followed along to see if there was a picture. The hotel had a dining room with gorgeous window light, and Ms. Butter was kind enough to allow me to take more photographs of her before her next engagement. It's a picture that reminds me to look for different pictures at assignments.

    (
    TAEHOON KIM / Summer 2013 intern)

  • In November I got to see a good portion of high school senior Brandon Richardson's ultra-marathon run across New Hampshire. I was impressed not only with his own effort, but with the commitment his entire family had made in order to support Brandon for the entire 215-mile journey from Canada to Massachusetts. Every time Brandon needed a break, a drink, or a change of shoes, they were there. Well after sunset on Brandon's third long day of running, his whole family was on the side of the road when Brandon's father Mark Richardson gave him a hug and he continued running into the night. I saw Brandon get many hugs at the finish line the next evening, but now I am more drawn to an image of one of the quieter gestures that kept him going.<br/><br/><br/>(WILL PARSON / Fall 2013 intern)

    In November I got to see a good portion of high school senior Brandon Richardson's ultra-marathon run across New Hampshire. I was impressed not only with his own effort, but with the commitment his entire family had made in order to support Brandon for the entire 215-mile journey from Canada to Massachusetts. Every time Brandon needed a break, a drink, or a change of shoes, they were there. Well after sunset on Brandon's third long day of running, his whole family was on the side of the road when Brandon's father Mark Richardson gave him a hug and he continued running into the night. I saw Brandon get many hugs at the finish line the next evening, but now I am more drawn to an image of one of the quieter gestures that kept him going.


    (WILL PARSON / Fall 2013 intern)

  • Werner Hertel, a sales consultant at Lincoln of Concord who has worked there for 21 years, leaves work for the last time as the car dealership closes for good on November 15, 2013. "I'm the last of the sales breed," said Hertel, who just turned 80 and hasn't decided whether he'll retire or find another position.<br/><br/> In making this photo, I was surprised by employee after employee who only had warm memories to share from working at Lincoln of Concord, even though they could easily have been bitter about losing their jobs. I met Werner Hertel while he was sitting at "his" table in the dealership's front room, where I imagined him closing countless sales over his two decades working there. He sat, watching people hurriedly make preparations for the building's turnover to its new owners. Hertel, who had just turned 80, was musing whether to keep selling cars or finally retire—he felt good, so why shouldn't he keep at it? After some farewell hugs and a smoke break, Hertel left a little after typical closing time at 5 o'clock. It's not often that a photographer finds a specific moment to represent a turning point in someone's life, and I was happy to experience what this business meant to the people who worked there.<br/><br/><br/>(WILL PARSON / Fall 2013 intern)

    Werner Hertel, a sales consultant at Lincoln of Concord who has worked there for 21 years, leaves work for the last time as the car dealership closes for good on November 15, 2013. "I'm the last of the sales breed," said Hertel, who just turned 80 and hasn't decided whether he'll retire or find another position.

    In making this photo, I was surprised by employee after employee who only had warm memories to share from working at Lincoln of Concord, even though they could easily have been bitter about losing their jobs. I met Werner Hertel while he was sitting at "his" table in the dealership's front room, where I imagined him closing countless sales over his two decades working there. He sat, watching people hurriedly make preparations for the building's turnover to its new owners. Hertel, who had just turned 80, was musing whether to keep selling cars or finally retire—he felt good, so why shouldn't he keep at it? After some farewell hugs and a smoke break, Hertel left a little after typical closing time at 5 o'clock. It's not often that a photographer finds a specific moment to represent a turning point in someone's life, and I was happy to experience what this business meant to the people who worked there.


    (WILL PARSON / Fall 2013 intern)

  • Gary LaCroix's belongings are seen on the shore of the Merrimack River on July 5, 2013. <br/><br/>This photograph was never published in The Concord Monitor. On July 4, 2013, I was on a police ridealong assignment when we were called to the Merrimack River for a possible drowning. A girl had been swept away by the unusually high river while she was tubing with her family. The girl was okay — but I also got to talk to Gary "Crabby" LaCroix, a man I had photographed earlier in the summer. He had witnessed the entire event as he was hanging out at his favorite fishing spot on the river. We chatted for awhile. Crabby told me how much he loved the photograph of him that had been published. We went our separate ways, telling each other we would see each other soon. On July 5, while I was out on assignment, I got called to the river again for a second possible drowning call in just as many days. When I arrived, I was notified it was Crabby who was missing. According to witnesses, he had gone into the river to retrieve a piece of garbage when he was pulled under by the strong current. Unlike the girl from the day before, Crabby was not okay. He had drowned at his favorite fishing spot.  It is a photograph that makes me wish I had spent more time with Crabby the first time I met him; yet, it is also a photograph that makes me happy that I had a chance to know him. Most importantly, it reminds me that any photographs I take will always impact my subjects' lives more than they will impact me.<br/><br/>(TAEHOON KIM / Summer 2013 intern)

    Gary LaCroix's belongings are seen on the shore of the Merrimack River on July 5, 2013.

    This photograph was never published in The Concord Monitor. On July 4, 2013, I was on a police ridealong assignment when we were called to the Merrimack River for a possible drowning. A girl had been swept away by the unusually high river while she was tubing with her family. The girl was okay — but I also got to talk to Gary "Crabby" LaCroix, a man I had photographed earlier in the summer. He had witnessed the entire event as he was hanging out at his favorite fishing spot on the river. We chatted for awhile. Crabby told me how much he loved the photograph of him that had been published. We went our separate ways, telling each other we would see each other soon. On July 5, while I was out on assignment, I got called to the river again for a second possible drowning call in just as many days. When I arrived, I was notified it was Crabby who was missing. According to witnesses, he had gone into the river to retrieve a piece of garbage when he was pulled under by the strong current. Unlike the girl from the day before, Crabby was not okay. He had drowned at his favorite fishing spot. It is a photograph that makes me wish I had spent more time with Crabby the first time I met him; yet, it is also a photograph that makes me happy that I had a chance to know him. Most importantly, it reminds me that any photographs I take will always impact my subjects' lives more than they will impact me.

    (TAEHOON KIM / Summer 2013 intern)

  • Using headlamps for light, Ascent of Honor team members Hans Aschinger, Keith Zeier and Eldon Hallows wash dishes following dinner at the Harvard cabin on Mount Washington on January 16, 2013.<br/> Shooting daily routines is the bread and butter of photojournalism. It is a window into someone's life or their way of life. In this case it is the way of life in a cabin without running water or electricity on the side of Mount Washington. The water (sometimes snow) is boiled and the “bucket system” comes out for washing, rinsing and sanitizing. When I showed some photos from an assignment on the mountain to cabin caretaker, Rich Palatino, this one stood out for him. “The bucket system is famous!” he said. I love how the simple act of washing dishes is transformed to simpler means.<br/><br/>(<br/>ALEXANDER COHN / Former photo editor)

    Using headlamps for light, Ascent of Honor team members Hans Aschinger, Keith Zeier and Eldon Hallows wash dishes following dinner at the Harvard cabin on Mount Washington on January 16, 2013.
    Shooting daily routines is the bread and butter of photojournalism. It is a window into someone's life or their way of life. In this case it is the way of life in a cabin without running water or electricity on the side of Mount Washington. The water (sometimes snow) is boiled and the “bucket system” comes out for washing, rinsing and sanitizing. When I showed some photos from an assignment on the mountain to cabin caretaker, Rich Palatino, this one stood out for him. “The bucket system is famous!” he said. I love how the simple act of washing dishes is transformed to simpler means.

    (
    ALEXANDER COHN / Former photo editor)

  • Twice a year, every year, we cover NASCAR. Twice a year, every year, we stand on hot asphalt, ear plugs jammed in our ears, dorky Speedway-issued orange photo vests sliding off our shoulders, trying to make a different photo. When I spotted Carrie Cornelissen and her son Liam standing on a truck in the infield at the July race, it was only the first few laps. I'd been wandering for a good spot and saw Carrie shielding her boy's ears from the aggressive buzzing of the stock cars. I wanted to make a photo of the race with Liam in the foreground when a small crash happened. No one was hurt. The juxtaposition was too much not to love. <br/><br/><br/><br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    Twice a year, every year, we cover NASCAR. Twice a year, every year, we stand on hot asphalt, ear plugs jammed in our ears, dorky Speedway-issued orange photo vests sliding off our shoulders, trying to make a different photo. When I spotted Carrie Cornelissen and her son Liam standing on a truck in the infield at the July race, it was only the first few laps. I'd been wandering for a good spot and saw Carrie shielding her boy's ears from the aggressive buzzing of the stock cars. I wanted to make a photo of the race with Liam in the foreground when a small crash happened. No one was hurt. The juxtaposition was too much not to love.




    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • Winter doldrums plague my Florida heart especially around the fourth month of New Hampshire winter. When maple season arrived in March, there was still lots of snow on the ground. I went to the Kearsarge Gore Farm in Warner to photograph production in their sugar house. Bob Bower and Jennifer Ohler have an amazing piece of land that they use to bring food to their community. They also have baby sheep, which was more amazing than a mega dose of Vitamin D to shake the winter blues away. <br/><br/><br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    Winter doldrums plague my Florida heart especially around the fourth month of New Hampshire winter. When maple season arrived in March, there was still lots of snow on the ground. I went to the Kearsarge Gore Farm in Warner to photograph production in their sugar house. Bob Bower and Jennifer Ohler have an amazing piece of land that they use to bring food to their community. They also have baby sheep, which was more amazing than a mega dose of Vitamin D to shake the winter blues away.



    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • Jill McDaniel and Rev. Terry Donovan have performed burial services for strangers at Blossom Hill Cemetery in Concord for over a year. Most people don't know about it, which is why I wanted to share their story. Stories like theirs are what inspire me each day. It's what keeps me at a community newspaper, the conviction that documenting what happens in this community will bridge differences, inform people, and maybe have people open up- at least a little bit. The fleeting moments keep life interesting. Photographers don't just snap photos. We have to anticipate and research to be in the right place at the right time. The camera is a tool we use to tell a story, much like an author uses a pen, or a radio MC uses a mic. This photo was made in 1/640 of a second, but it took over a year of waiting and constant dialogue to gain access to that moment of a rose being tossed from a granite ledge. None of this would have been possible without the constant patience and participation from Jill McDaniel and Rev. Terry Donovan. Two women who opened part of their lives and let me in.<br/><br/><br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

    Jill McDaniel and Rev. Terry Donovan have performed burial services for strangers at Blossom Hill Cemetery in Concord for over a year. Most people don't know about it, which is why I wanted to share their story. Stories like theirs are what inspire me each day. It's what keeps me at a community newspaper, the conviction that documenting what happens in this community will bridge differences, inform people, and maybe have people open up- at least a little bit. The fleeting moments keep life interesting. Photographers don't just snap photos. We have to anticipate and research to be in the right place at the right time. The camera is a tool we use to tell a story, much like an author uses a pen, or a radio MC uses a mic. This photo was made in 1/640 of a second, but it took over a year of waiting and constant dialogue to gain access to that moment of a rose being tossed from a granite ledge. None of this would have been possible without the constant patience and participation from Jill McDaniel and Rev. Terry Donovan. Two women who opened part of their lives and let me in.


    (JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

  • Concord Monitor's 2013 in Pictures<br/><br/>(Monitor staff)
  • When the Boston bombings happened in April, we knew there would be local implications. Boston is the big city, just an hour away. Many people in our community made frantic phone calls to loved ones who were there that day, including one Concord father, Jeff Bauman. One of the most devastating images that came from that day of chaos was Jeff's oldest son and namesake, Jeff, being wheeled down the street after suffering serious injuries from one of the blasts. Weeks later, reporter Kathleen Ronyane and I were invited to visit Jeff at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston. The family was exercising appropriate privacy when it came to the media, but the Monitor is dad's hometown paper and he wanted his community to know how his son was doing. He trusted us to do that. During the interview, friends that were next to the younger Jeff when the bombs went off came from their own recovery rooms down the hall to visit, one friend with her adorable grandmother Mary Perra. As soon as they walked in, Jeff lit up. Mary was quick with affection and embraces in a way that made the whole room warm. It was clear that the people around Jeff, making support and love a priority, were instrumental to his recovery. That's the kind of story we love to tell. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)
  • My favorite photos and experiences through life are those unexpected moments amidst an otherwise quiet scene. This popular swimming spot in the North Country is on the Upper Ammonoosuc River near the base of Mount Washington. I've been working on a personal project, a visual letter, about a magical area around the White Mountains. It's a place that has captivated me my entire life as I found myself moving around the country. Being a photojournalist for a daily community newspaper means constantly looking in at other people's lives and working to gain a stranger's trust to tell their story and do it justice. But many times, exploring other people's lives creates a void where I find myself continually probing the question, What is it I'm doing and why am I doing it? Today's climate in the newspaper industry is no secret and the forecast isn't very promising either. But personal projects are necessary for finding a voice and continually pushing for some sort of truth or understanding about the world around us. Being a photographer on New Hampshire's backroads, especially in the north, provides liberation from the workplace and an opportunity for exploration of self and surroundings.<br/><br/><br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)
  • Most photojournalists will tell you that their favorite part of the job is getting to explore worlds and lives they otherwise would not. In my eight months at the Monitor, I met some amazing people. I spent time with the John-Stark/Hopkinton High School Robotics team, Oz-Ram. It was an amazing group of students, teachers and parents who spent six weeks to build a robot from scratch that would be able to throw frisbees and climb a pyramid, then competed with teams all around the world. Team leaders Will Renauld, a Hopkinton teacher, and Jeff Beltramo, an NHTI professor, have created a team where any student, not just those interested in engineering, has a place. It could be on the spirit team making signs and costumes, or the build team or even web design. It was so cool to watch this group of students come together to reach their goal, the positivity and the team work was admirable.<br/><br/><br/>(SAMANTHA GORESH / Winter 2013 intern)
  • Reporter Sarah Palermo and I spent a day with Tammy Boucher, a Pembroke woman who was nominated by her husband as a mother worth profiling for a Mother's Day story, and her family as they went about their routines. In May, that included a daily visit to Tammy's father Roy Annis, right, at Pleasant View Retirement Home in Concord. Her kids, Cove, 10, and Cheyenne, 15, came along to visit their "pop-pop."  His health had been slipping for months, a combination of dementia and other ailments. He was having what Tammy called "a bad day." While Tammy circled the floor of the home looking for some of her father's favorite snacks to help his waning appetite, Cheyenne took her grandfather's hand to try and talk to him. She searched his face for reactions while telling him about her day and school. It was a quiet, emotional moment for me seeing this young girl handle the reality of the situation so gracefully and compassionately, just like her mother taught her. To me, the photograph shows the strength of a bond and the fragility of life.  It was real. We heard from Tammy a few days later that her father had passed away. She was so grateful for the photographs of this day, despite it having a few low moments. I am grateful to the Bouchers for their generosity of time and spirit, as well as reminding me that documenting life, both the mundane and the ceremonial, means something to someone. <br/><br/><br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)
  • This portrait was taken when Ms. Irene Butter came to Concord to speak about her experiences surviving the Holocaust to Concord High School students. I wanted to make a picture that wasn't just a photograph of Ms. Butter speaking at a podium, although that would have been the easy way to finish the assignment. When Reporter Kathleen Ronayne let me know that she was interviewing Ms. Butter at The Centennial Hotel after her talk, I followed along to see if there was a picture. The hotel had a dining room with gorgeous window light, and Ms. Butter was kind enough to allow me to take more photographs of her before her next engagement. It's a picture that reminds me to look for different pictures at assignments. <br/><br/>(<br/>TAEHOON KIM / Summer 2013 intern)
  • In November I got to see a good portion of high school senior Brandon Richardson's ultra-marathon run across New Hampshire. I was impressed not only with his own effort, but with the commitment his entire family had made in order to support Brandon for the entire 215-mile journey from Canada to Massachusetts. Every time Brandon needed a break, a drink, or a change of shoes, they were there. Well after sunset on Brandon's third long day of running, his whole family was on the side of the road when Brandon's father Mark Richardson gave him a hug and he continued running into the night. I saw Brandon get many hugs at the finish line the next evening, but now I am more drawn to an image of one of the quieter gestures that kept him going.<br/><br/><br/>(WILL PARSON / Fall 2013 intern)
  • Werner Hertel, a sales consultant at Lincoln of Concord who has worked there for 21 years, leaves work for the last time as the car dealership closes for good on November 15, 2013. "I'm the last of the sales breed," said Hertel, who just turned 80 and hasn't decided whether he'll retire or find another position.<br/><br/> In making this photo, I was surprised by employee after employee who only had warm memories to share from working at Lincoln of Concord, even though they could easily have been bitter about losing their jobs. I met Werner Hertel while he was sitting at "his" table in the dealership's front room, where I imagined him closing countless sales over his two decades working there. He sat, watching people hurriedly make preparations for the building's turnover to its new owners. Hertel, who had just turned 80, was musing whether to keep selling cars or finally retire—he felt good, so why shouldn't he keep at it? After some farewell hugs and a smoke break, Hertel left a little after typical closing time at 5 o'clock. It's not often that a photographer finds a specific moment to represent a turning point in someone's life, and I was happy to experience what this business meant to the people who worked there.<br/><br/><br/>(WILL PARSON / Fall 2013 intern)
  • Gary LaCroix's belongings are seen on the shore of the Merrimack River on July 5, 2013. <br/><br/>This photograph was never published in The Concord Monitor. On July 4, 2013, I was on a police ridealong assignment when we were called to the Merrimack River for a possible drowning. A girl had been swept away by the unusually high river while she was tubing with her family. The girl was okay — but I also got to talk to Gary "Crabby" LaCroix, a man I had photographed earlier in the summer. He had witnessed the entire event as he was hanging out at his favorite fishing spot on the river. We chatted for awhile. Crabby told me how much he loved the photograph of him that had been published. We went our separate ways, telling each other we would see each other soon. On July 5, while I was out on assignment, I got called to the river again for a second possible drowning call in just as many days. When I arrived, I was notified it was Crabby who was missing. According to witnesses, he had gone into the river to retrieve a piece of garbage when he was pulled under by the strong current. Unlike the girl from the day before, Crabby was not okay. He had drowned at his favorite fishing spot.  It is a photograph that makes me wish I had spent more time with Crabby the first time I met him; yet, it is also a photograph that makes me happy that I had a chance to know him. Most importantly, it reminds me that any photographs I take will always impact my subjects' lives more than they will impact me.<br/><br/>(TAEHOON KIM / Summer 2013 intern)
  • Using headlamps for light, Ascent of Honor team members Hans Aschinger, Keith Zeier and Eldon Hallows wash dishes following dinner at the Harvard cabin on Mount Washington on January 16, 2013.<br/> Shooting daily routines is the bread and butter of photojournalism. It is a window into someone's life or their way of life. In this case it is the way of life in a cabin without running water or electricity on the side of Mount Washington. The water (sometimes snow) is boiled and the “bucket system” comes out for washing, rinsing and sanitizing. When I showed some photos from an assignment on the mountain to cabin caretaker, Rich Palatino, this one stood out for him. “The bucket system is famous!” he said. I love how the simple act of washing dishes is transformed to simpler means.<br/><br/>(<br/>ALEXANDER COHN / Former photo editor)
  • Twice a year, every year, we cover NASCAR. Twice a year, every year, we stand on hot asphalt, ear plugs jammed in our ears, dorky Speedway-issued orange photo vests sliding off our shoulders, trying to make a different photo. When I spotted Carrie Cornelissen and her son Liam standing on a truck in the infield at the July race, it was only the first few laps. I'd been wandering for a good spot and saw Carrie shielding her boy's ears from the aggressive buzzing of the stock cars. I wanted to make a photo of the race with Liam in the foreground when a small crash happened. No one was hurt. The juxtaposition was too much not to love. <br/><br/><br/><br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)
  • Winter doldrums plague my Florida heart especially around the fourth month of New Hampshire winter. When maple season arrived in March, there was still lots of snow on the ground. I went to the Kearsarge Gore Farm in Warner to photograph production in their sugar house. Bob Bower and Jennifer Ohler have an amazing piece of land that they use to bring food to their community. They also have baby sheep, which was more amazing than a mega dose of Vitamin D to shake the winter blues away. <br/><br/><br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)
  • Jill McDaniel and Rev. Terry Donovan have performed burial services for strangers at Blossom Hill Cemetery in Concord for over a year. Most people don't know about it, which is why I wanted to share their story. Stories like theirs are what inspire me each day. It's what keeps me at a community newspaper, the conviction that documenting what happens in this community will bridge differences, inform people, and maybe have people open up- at least a little bit. The fleeting moments keep life interesting. Photographers don't just snap photos. We have to anticipate and research to be in the right place at the right time. The camera is a tool we use to tell a story, much like an author uses a pen, or a radio MC uses a mic. This photo was made in 1/640 of a second, but it took over a year of waiting and constant dialogue to gain access to that moment of a rose being tossed from a granite ledge. None of this would have been possible without the constant patience and participation from Jill McDaniel and Rev. Terry Donovan. Two women who opened part of their lives and let me in.<br/><br/><br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

When we decided as a photo staff to look back on the year to share our favorite photos, it wasn’t the images of court days or accident scenes we hustled to that made the cut. What rose to the top were photos produced from striving for deeper connections in our community. Some photos you’ve seen published in our pages. Some are unpublished outtakes that we hope resonate with you in retrospect. Read the reflections from the photographers that made the photos above.

Legacy Comments1

Your photos of the year are worthy of another Pulitzer! What is especially of value is the commentary by the photographers. Your photo team should take pride in what they have captured. The Holocaust survivor photo is particularly haunting, but there are many others of human life that are great visual stories. The Monitor should take great pride in its photo staff. Ken Williams and Dan Habib have left a splendid legacy. Randall Raymond, Exeter, NH

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