×

Liberty Utilities still looking to sell Concord gasholder building

  • The iconic gasholder building on South Main Street in Concord is seen on Monday, Jan. 29, 2018. The structure has been added to the National Register of Historic Places. (ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff) Elizabeth Frantz

  • The iconic gasholder building on South Main Street in Concord is seen on Monday, Jan. 29, 2018. The structure has been added to the National Register of Historic Places. (ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff) Elizabeth Frantz

  • The iconic gasholder building on South Main Street in Concord is seen on Monday, Jan. 29, 2018. The structure has been added to the National Register of Historic Places. (ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff) Elizabeth Frantz

  • The iconic gasholder building on South Main Street in Concord is seen on Monday, Jan. 29, 2018. The structure has been added to the National Register of Historic Places. (ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff) Elizabeth Frantz



Monitor staff
Wednesday, January 31, 2018

The future of the Concord gasholder building is still up in the air despite its listing this week on the National Register of Historic Places.

The new listing makes the building eligible for certain grants and tax breaks, but does not offer legal protection: Privately owned buildings on the register can still be torn down and replaced.

Liberty Utilities “has been working with several private parties with an interest in purchasing and revitalizing the building,” wrote John Shore, spokesman for Liberty Utilities, which owns the iconic round brick building in south Concord. While none of these have resulted in an agreement, “we are hopeful one will at some point.”

No other details are available while discussions continue, he said.

The building held gas, made from coal processed on the site, that was used for lighting and heat in Concord from 1888 through 1953, and has been empty since. 

Liberty bought the building and its 2.4-acre property on South Main Street as part of its 2012 purchase of National Grid’s natural gas business in New Hampshire. The company says it has no use for the property, which is not part of the natural gas system. 

Gasholder buildings existing in most American cities before natural gas become popular and while many still exist, Concord’s may be the only one  in the country that still holds the huge machinery that was used to contain the gas. This is why it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Liberty has said that it could cost $500,000 to stabilize the building, which has suffered some damage over the years, and perhaps a million dollars to make it usable.