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PHOTOS: Looking at a bug’s life

  • Johanna Nugent, of Manchester, searches for bugs from a sample taken from the Merrimack River. In 2011, Nugent and her boyfriend Jeff Marcoux, also of Manchester, met while both were volunteering and retrieving bugs from the water on the Contoocook River for Bug Nights. Since 1995, the Upper Merrimack River Local Advisory Committee has been hosting Bug Night where volunteers work to answer a looming question, "How's the water" in the Merrimack River by way of bugs. The bugs show long term water health on the river, said Michele Tremblay, chair of the committee. People of all ages and backgrounds volunteer at the Wednesday night 'Bug Nights' at St. Paul School, working to count and identify roughly 60 families of aquatic insects found on the Merrimack River, Steve Landry, Merrimack watershed supervisor, said. The bug monitoring traces pollution on the river to its source and is a way for the community to take control of the environment, Tremblay said.<br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

    Johanna Nugent, of Manchester, searches for bugs from a sample taken from the Merrimack River. In 2011, Nugent and her boyfriend Jeff Marcoux, also of Manchester, met while both were volunteering and retrieving bugs from the water on the Contoocook River for Bug Nights. Since 1995, the Upper Merrimack River Local Advisory Committee has been hosting Bug Night where volunteers work to answer a looming question, "How's the water" in the Merrimack River by way of bugs. The bugs show long term water health on the river, said Michele Tremblay, chair of the committee. People of all ages and backgrounds volunteer at the Wednesday night 'Bug Nights' at St. Paul School, working to count and identify roughly 60 families of aquatic insects found on the Merrimack River, Steve Landry, Merrimack watershed supervisor, said. The bug monitoring traces pollution on the river to its source and is a way for the community to take control of the environment, Tremblay said.
    (JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

  • Henry Fleury, 15, far right, a ninth grader at Bow High School, grins as other volunteers line up at 'Bug Nights' check out a larger than normally seen Psephenidae, also called a water penny beetle, he found in his river sample on Wednesday night, January 29, 2014. This is the second year Fleury and his father, Kevin, have volunteered. Since 1995, the Upper Merrimack River Local Advisory Committee has been hosting Bug Night where volunteers work to answer a looming question, "How's the water" in the Merrimack River by way of bugs. The bugs show long term water health on the river, said Michele Tremblay, chair of the committee. People of all ages and backgrounds volunteer at the Wednesday night 'Bug Nights' at St. Paul School, working to count and identify roughly 60 families of aquatic insects found on the Merrimack River, Steve Landry, Merrimack watershed supervisor, said. The bug monitoring traces pollution on the river to its source and is a way for the community to take control of the environment, Tremblay said.<br/><br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

    Henry Fleury, 15, far right, a ninth grader at Bow High School, grins as other volunteers line up at 'Bug Nights' check out a larger than normally seen Psephenidae, also called a water penny beetle, he found in his river sample on Wednesday night, January 29, 2014. This is the second year Fleury and his father, Kevin, have volunteered. Since 1995, the Upper Merrimack River Local Advisory Committee has been hosting Bug Night where volunteers work to answer a looming question, "How's the water" in the Merrimack River by way of bugs. The bugs show long term water health on the river, said Michele Tremblay, chair of the committee. People of all ages and backgrounds volunteer at the Wednesday night 'Bug Nights' at St. Paul School, working to count and identify roughly 60 families of aquatic insects found on the Merrimack River, Steve Landry, Merrimack watershed supervisor, said. The bug monitoring traces pollution on the river to its source and is a way for the community to take control of the environment, Tremblay said.

    (JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

  • Johanna Nugent, of Manchester, searches for bugs from a sample taken from the Merrimack River. In 2011, Nugent and her boyfriend Jeff Marcoux, also of Manchester, met while both were volunteering and retrieving bugs from the water on the Contoocook River for Bug Nights. Since 1995, the Upper Merrimack River Local Advisory Committee has been hosting Bug Night where volunteers work to answer a looming question, "How's the water" in the Merrimack River by way of bugs. The bugs show long term water health on the river, said Michele Tremblay, chair of the committee. People of all ages and backgrounds volunteer at the Wednesday night 'Bug Nights' at St. Paul School, working to count and identify roughly 60 families of aquatic insects found on the Merrimack River, Steve Landry, Merrimack watershed supervisor, said. The bug monitoring traces pollution on the river to its source and is a way for the community to take control of the environment, Tremblay said.<br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)
  • Henry Fleury, 15, far right, a ninth grader at Bow High School, grins as other volunteers line up at 'Bug Nights' check out a larger than normally seen Psephenidae, also called a water penny beetle, he found in his river sample on Wednesday night, January 29, 2014. This is the second year Fleury and his father, Kevin, have volunteered. Since 1995, the Upper Merrimack River Local Advisory Committee has been hosting Bug Night where volunteers work to answer a looming question, "How's the water" in the Merrimack River by way of bugs. The bugs show long term water health on the river, said Michele Tremblay, chair of the committee. People of all ages and backgrounds volunteer at the Wednesday night 'Bug Nights' at St. Paul School, working to count and identify roughly 60 families of aquatic insects found on the Merrimack River, Steve Landry, Merrimack watershed supervisor, said. The bug monitoring traces pollution on the river to its source and is a way for the community to take control of the environment, Tremblay said.<br/><br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

Since 1995, the Upper Merrimack River Local Advisory Committee has been hosting Bug Night, where volunteers work to answer a looming question: How’s the water in the Merrimack River by way of bugs? The bugs show long-term water health of the river, said Michele Tremblay, chairwoman of the committee. People of all ages and backgrounds volunteer at Bug Night – which is held most Wednesdays during the winter at St. Paul’s School in Concord – working to count and identify roughly 60 families of aquatic insects found on the river, said Steve Landry, Merrimack watershed supervisor. The bug monitoring traces pollution in the river to its source and is a way for the community to take control of the environment, Tremblay said.

Legacy Comments1

I found out about Bug Nights at www.MerrimackRiver.org. There's lots of good information and data there and I was able to sign up for their newsletter.

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