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Boston Marathon: Bow runner gets chance of a lifetime

  • Kally Abrams, a Stonyfield employee that earned a spot in the marathon through a contest that gave entries to runners that missed the entry cutoff, stands for a portrait outside her home at Bow on Saturday, April 19, 2014. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    Kally Abrams, a Stonyfield employee that earned a spot in the marathon through a contest that gave entries to runners that missed the entry cutoff, stands for a portrait outside her home at Bow on Saturday, April 19, 2014.

    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • Kally Abrams, a Stonyfield employee that earned a spot in the marathon through a contest that gave entries to runners that missed the entry cutoff, stands for a portrait outside her home at Bow on Saturday, April 19, 2014. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    Kally Abrams, a Stonyfield employee that earned a spot in the marathon through a contest that gave entries to runners that missed the entry cutoff, stands for a portrait outside her home at Bow on Saturday, April 19, 2014.

    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • Kally Abrams, a Stonyfield employee that earned a spot in the marathon through a contest that gave entries to runners that missed the entry cutoff, stands for a portrait outside her home at Bow on Saturday, April 19, 2014. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    Kally Abrams, a Stonyfield employee that earned a spot in the marathon through a contest that gave entries to runners that missed the entry cutoff, stands for a portrait outside her home at Bow on Saturday, April 19, 2014.

    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • Kally Abrams, a Stonyfield employee that earned a spot in the marathon through a contest that gave entries to runners that missed the entry cutoff, stands for a portrait outside her home at Bow on Saturday, April 19, 2014. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)
  • Kally Abrams, a Stonyfield employee that earned a spot in the marathon through a contest that gave entries to runners that missed the entry cutoff, stands for a portrait outside her home at Bow on Saturday, April 19, 2014. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)
  • Kally Abrams, a Stonyfield employee that earned a spot in the marathon through a contest that gave entries to runners that missed the entry cutoff, stands for a portrait outside her home at Bow on Saturday, April 19, 2014. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

When Bow’s Kally Abrams found out her employer, Stonyfield Farms, was giving away entries into this year’s Boston Marathon, she pounced.

“I do nothing small, so I pretty much wrote a book going back to the fifth grade and detailing all of my accomplishments and explaining why this was the next natural step for me,” Abrams said. “And when they let me know I got it, I was ecstatic that they believed in me and had faith that I could do it.”

Stonyfield, the New Hampshire company best known for its organic yogurt and co-founded by Concord’s Gary Hirshberg, is one of the sponsors for this year’s marathon. The company also decided to give away 10 race entries to runners who missed the entry cutoff. There was a nationwide contest for nine of those spots, but one entry was saved for someone in-house. Like the rest of the contestants, the Stonyfield employees had to write essays explaining why running Boston would be special to them, and Abrams’s self-described “dissertation” came out on top.

Abrams, 43, has been active and athletic her entire life. She was the little girl who could do more pullups and situps than all the boys, played volleyball in high school, got into weight training in college, and became an ambitious bicyclist and hiker as an adult. But it wasn’t until she joined the Stonyfield Athletic Team in December 2012 that she started doing road races.

After running in some half marathons as part of the company team, Abrams knew she was ready for the full 26.2 miles. And as soon as she earned the entry to Boston, she began training with her customary diligence and positivity, which is exactly how she plans on running the race.

“My family and friends will be at the finish line and I’ll have over 100 co-workers along the route this year,” Abrams said. “None of us have let our thoughts drift away from the pure and wonderful event we are about to be a part of. We’ve remembered and honor the victims, but have also pushed aside any lingering dark shadows that try to keep hold from a year ago.”

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