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Program for prisoners’ kids scaled back this year

Seven New Hampshire children will be spending time with their incarcerated parents next month, though the program that brings them together had to be scaled back this year.

The children were supposed to spend two weeks at an overnight camp in Penacook and one or two days at either the state prison for men in Concord or the women’s prison in Goffstown.

Those plans got upended, however, when the camp was shut down in July for the rest of the summer due to a bed-bug infestation. Instead, five children will be visiting their fathers in Concord on Aug. 19 and Aug. 21, and two children will visit their mother in Goffstown on Aug. 20, said Kristina Toth of the Family Connections Center. The center works to strengthen the connection between incarcerated parents and their children to help reduce recidivism.

Started in 2012, the program gives children a chance to paint, play games and dine with their moms or dads while also attending a traditional summer camp. The children were to attend Camp Spaulding in Penacook, run by the nonprofit Child and Family Services agency for children from low-income families.

Associated Press

The program is patterned after one started by Washington, D.C.-based Hope House, a nonprofit that runs camps in prisons in multiple states. Seven New Hampshire children will be spending time with their incarcerated parents next month, though the program that brings them together had to be scaled-back this year.

The children were supposed to spend two weeks at an overnight camp in Penacook and one or two days at either the state prison for men in Concord or the women’s prison in Goffstown.

Those plans got upended, however, when the camp was shut down in July for the rest of the summer due to a bed-bug infestation. Instead, five children will be visiting their fathers in Concord on Aug. 19 and Aug. 21, and two children will visit their mother in Goffstown on Aug. 20, said Kristina Toth of the Family Connections Center. The center works to strengthen the connection between incarcerated parents and their children to help reduce recidivism.

Started in 2012, the program gives children a chance to paint, play games and dine with their moms or dads while also attending a traditional summer camp. The children were to attend Camp Spaulding in Penacook, run by the nonprofit Child and Family Services agency for children from low-income families.

The program is patterned after one started by Washington, D.C.-based Hope House, a nonprofit that runs camps in prisons in multiple states.

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