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STEP RIGHT UP

Kimball-Jenkins auction and reception raises money for scholarships and classes

  • “Egg Drop Soup” by Alberta Geyer

    “Egg Drop Soup” by Alberta Geyer

  • “Nubble Point” by Peter Coe

    “Nubble Point” by Peter Coe

  • “The Fish Mongers Daughter” by Michael Garlington

    “The Fish Mongers Daughter” by Michael Garlington

  • “Skiff” by Pam Tarbell

    “Skiff” by Pam Tarbell

  • “Pear Solitaire” by Peter Noonan

    “Pear Solitaire” by Peter Noonan

  • “Touch of Light” by Emily Moore

    “Touch of Light” by Emily Moore

  • “Sylvia’s Birthday Bouquet” by Carolyn Sherman

    “Sylvia’s Birthday Bouquet” by Carolyn Sherman

  • "Turn of the Lens" by E.C. Weiler

    "Turn of the Lens" by E.C. Weiler

  • "Untitiled 837 1/2" by Barbara Filleul

    "Untitiled 837 1/2" by Barbara Filleul

  • “Untitled one” by Ann Sauderson

    “Untitled one” by Ann Sauderson

  • “On the Move” by Mimi Wiggin

    “On the Move” by Mimi Wiggin

  • Necklace and bracelet by Lisa Hall

    Necklace and bracelet by Lisa Hall

  • “Koi” by Mary Ruedig

    “Koi” by Mary Ruedig

  • “Al’s Garden” by Emily Moore

    “Al’s Garden” by Emily Moore

  • “Cottontail” by Rosemary Conroy

    “Cottontail” by Rosemary Conroy

  • “Low Ave., Concord” by Carolyn Sherman.

    “Low Ave., Concord” by Carolyn Sherman.

  • “Egg Drop Soup” by Alberta Geyer
  • “Nubble Point” by Peter Coe
  • “The Fish Mongers Daughter” by Michael Garlington
  • “Skiff” by Pam Tarbell
  • “Pear Solitaire” by Peter Noonan
  • “Touch of Light” by Emily Moore
  • “Sylvia’s Birthday Bouquet” by Carolyn Sherman
  • "Turn of the Lens" by E.C. Weiler
  • "Untitiled 837 1/2" by Barbara Filleul
  • “Untitled one” by Ann Sauderson
  • “On the Move” by Mimi Wiggin
  • Necklace and bracelet by Lisa Hall
  • “Koi” by Mary Ruedig
  • “Al’s Garden” by Emily Moore
  • “Cottontail” by Rosemary Conroy
  • “Low Ave., Concord” by Carolyn Sherman.

A strong-faced woman holds a giant dead-eyed fish like a prize in her bare hands, a crisp study in black and white. In the background, spectating eyes pick up a sinister-looking man in a bear suit, watching, waiting.

As if the photograph itself wasn’t darkly intriguing, it comes with a story free to anyone who bids on this piece at the Kimball-Jenkins School of Art’s third annual Paint The Town art auction and reception Friday, Sept. 12.

“A few years ago, the artist Michael Garlington had a show and a burglar broke in and stole his photographs. This was the only one that was ever recovered,” said Karina Kelley, the vice president of the board at Kimball-Jenkins and co-chairwoman of the event, speaking of the photograph entitled the “Fish Mongers Daughter .”

“So the police recently released it from their evidence archives and when he was asked if he wanted the painting back, Michael Garlington said no, go ahead and auction it off.

“So it has kind of an interesting backstory to go along with it.”

The proceeds from the auction and reception go toward scholarships and keeping costs low for kids’ art classes at Kimball-Jenkins. Kelley said the mission of the School of Art is to provide the community with arts instruction at a cost that families can afford, with an emphasis on serving those without means to afford the school’s tuition.

The School of Art at the Kimball-Jenkins Estate is open to people of all ages and all educational and skill levels, offering classes and workshops in both the visual and performing arts.

Kimball-Jenkins officials said the money goes toward, among other things, expansion of course offerings, hiring faculty, scholarship awards, facility improvements, expanding assistance to the immigrant population, veterans and families of those serving in the military, and seniors on fixed income as well as increasing outreach programming into local public schools.

Last year the Paint the Town auction raised $35,000 for the school and this year’s turnout and offerings will hopefully surpass that mark. In addition to the “Fish Mongers Daughter,” there are landscapes, jewelry, pottery and pretty painted portraits of parts of the city of Concord. Oh, and not to worry, said Kelley, there will be chickens.

“Last year we had an artist that did a painting of a pig and it was one of our most popular items,” she said. “So this year we do have a couple chickens, because we think people would really enjoy them. . . . My take on it is that people are looking for pieces to go along with their home décor and want a piece to complete a room. And animals especially, I think, have a nice warm feel.”

The selection for the auction was made through a jury process and includes artists such as Alberta Geyer, Carolyn Sherman and Peter Coe as well as some of the better Kimball-Jenkins students.

In addition to art, Kelley said, they are also auctioning off opportunities such as a private tour and tasting for 20 people at Zorvino Vineyards, a private tour and tasting for two at Moonlight Meadery and a Private Home & Art Collection tour with local expert Mary McGowan.

“She has a beautiful Victorian art collection,” Kelley said. “So she is offering a private tour and drinks at her home.”

The evening will also feature some live art with Chris Pothier painting a landscape that will be finished and put up for auction that night.

“He’s the artist-in-residence at Kimball-Jenkins and he does a lot of very, very realistic work, a lot of portraits, but he’s nationally known to be a great portrait artist, although I think he will be doing a landscape for the actual event,” Kelley said.

The event is $30 per person and includes cocktails a carving station and hors d’oeuvres catered by area eateries, as well as a wine raffle and live music.

For an auction preview, to bid online or to purchase tickets, visit biddingforgood.com/kimballjenkins. For information, call 225-3932.

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