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Around world, gun rules, and results, vary wildly

  • In this Friday, Jan. 18, 2013 photo, a Japanese shotgun enthusiast takes a test to renew his license on a shooting range in Ooi, at the foot of Mount Fuji. In this country, guns are few and far between. And so is gun violence. Guns were used in only seven murders in Japan - a nation of about 130 million - in all of 2011, the most recent year for official statistics. According to police, more people - nine - were murdered with scissors. (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)

    In this Friday, Jan. 18, 2013 photo, a Japanese shotgun enthusiast takes a test to renew his license on a shooting range in Ooi, at the foot of Mount Fuji. In this country, guns are few and far between. And so is gun violence. Guns were used in only seven murders in Japan - a nation of about 130 million - in all of 2011, the most recent year for official statistics. According to police, more people - nine - were murdered with scissors. (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)

  • In this Friday, Jan. 18, 2013 photo, Japanese rifle enthusiast Yasuharu Watabe displays his gun at a shooting range in Ooi, near the foot of Mount Fuji, . Guns are few and far between in Japan because of strict regulations. But many gun-ownership supporters like Watabe say they don't want the kind of freedoms Americans have because they fear it would lead to more gun-related violence. (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)

    In this Friday, Jan. 18, 2013 photo, Japanese rifle enthusiast Yasuharu Watabe displays his gun at a shooting range in Ooi, near the foot of Mount Fuji, . Guns are few and far between in Japan because of strict regulations. But many gun-ownership supporters like Watabe say they don't want the kind of freedoms Americans have because they fear it would lead to more gun-related violence. (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)

  • In this Friday, Jan. 18, 2013 photo, Japanese rifle enthusiast Yasuharu Watabe displays his gun at a shooting range in Ooi, near the foot of Mount Fuji, . Guns are few and far between in Japan because of strict regulations. But many gun-ownership supporters like Watabe say they don't want the kind of freedoms Americans have because they fear it would lead to more gun-related violence. (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)

    In this Friday, Jan. 18, 2013 photo, Japanese rifle enthusiast Yasuharu Watabe displays his gun at a shooting range in Ooi, near the foot of Mount Fuji, . Guns are few and far between in Japan because of strict regulations. But many gun-ownership supporters like Watabe say they don't want the kind of freedoms Americans have because they fear it would lead to more gun-related violence. (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)

  • In this photo taken Friday, Jan. 18, 2013, a Japanese shotgun enthusiast takes a test to renew his license on a shooting range in Ooi at the foot of Mount Fuji, west of Tokyo. Guns are few and far between in Japan, which has strict gun restrictions and very little gun-related violence.  (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)

    In this photo taken Friday, Jan. 18, 2013, a Japanese shotgun enthusiast takes a test to renew his license on a shooting range in Ooi at the foot of Mount Fuji, west of Tokyo. Guns are few and far between in Japan, which has strict gun restrictions and very little gun-related violence. (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)

  • In this photo taken Friday, Jan. 18, 2013, a Japanese shotgun enthusiast takes a test to renew his license on a shooting range in Ooi at the foot of Mount Fuji, west of Tokyo. Guns are few and far between in Japan, which has strict gun restrictions and very little gun-related violence.  (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)

    In this photo taken Friday, Jan. 18, 2013, a Japanese shotgun enthusiast takes a test to renew his license on a shooting range in Ooi at the foot of Mount Fuji, west of Tokyo. Guns are few and far between in Japan, which has strict gun restrictions and very little gun-related violence. (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)

  • In this photo taken Friday, Jan. 18, 2013, a Japanese shotgun enthusiast takes a test to renew his license on a shooting range in Ooi, at the foot of Mount Fuji, west of Tokyo. Guns are few and far between in Japan, which has strict gun restrictions and very little gun-related violence.  (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)

    In this photo taken Friday, Jan. 18, 2013, a Japanese shotgun enthusiast takes a test to renew his license on a shooting range in Ooi, at the foot of Mount Fuji, west of Tokyo. Guns are few and far between in Japan, which has strict gun restrictions and very little gun-related violence. (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)

  • In this photo taken Friday, Jan. 18, 2013, a Japanese shotgun enthusiast takes a test to renew his license on a shooting range in Ooi, at the foot of Mount Fuji, west of Tokyo. Guns are few and far between in Japan, which has strict gun restrictions and very little gun-related violence.  (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)

    In this photo taken Friday, Jan. 18, 2013, a Japanese shotgun enthusiast takes a test to renew his license on a shooting range in Ooi, at the foot of Mount Fuji, west of Tokyo. Guns are few and far between in Japan, which has strict gun restrictions and very little gun-related violence. (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)

  • In this Friday, Jan. 18, 2013 photo, a Japanese shotgun enthusiast takes a test to renew his license on a shooting range in Ooi, at the foot of Mount Fuji. In this country, guns are few and far between. And so is gun violence. Guns were used in only seven murders in Japan - a nation of about 130 million - in all of 2011, the most recent year for official statistics. According to police, more people - nine - were murdered with scissors. (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)

    In this Friday, Jan. 18, 2013 photo, a Japanese shotgun enthusiast takes a test to renew his license on a shooting range in Ooi, at the foot of Mount Fuji. In this country, guns are few and far between. And so is gun violence. Guns were used in only seven murders in Japan - a nation of about 130 million - in all of 2011, the most recent year for official statistics. According to police, more people - nine - were murdered with scissors. (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)

  • In this Friday, Jan. 18, 2013 photo, a Japanese shotgun enthusiast takes a test to renew his license on a shooting range in Ooi, at the foot of Mount Fuji. In this country, guns are few and far between. And so is gun violence. Guns were used in only seven murders in Japan - a nation of about 130 million - in all of 2011, the most recent year for official statistics. According to police, more people - nine - were murdered with scissors. (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)
  • In this Friday, Jan. 18, 2013 photo, Japanese rifle enthusiast Yasuharu Watabe displays his gun at a shooting range in Ooi, near the foot of Mount Fuji, . Guns are few and far between in Japan because of strict regulations. But many gun-ownership supporters like Watabe say they don't want the kind of freedoms Americans have because they fear it would lead to more gun-related violence. (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)
  • In this Friday, Jan. 18, 2013 photo, Japanese rifle enthusiast Yasuharu Watabe displays his gun at a shooting range in Ooi, near the foot of Mount Fuji, . Guns are few and far between in Japan because of strict regulations. But many gun-ownership supporters like Watabe say they don't want the kind of freedoms Americans have because they fear it would lead to more gun-related violence. (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)
  • In this photo taken Friday, Jan. 18, 2013, a Japanese shotgun enthusiast takes a test to renew his license on a shooting range in Ooi at the foot of Mount Fuji, west of Tokyo. Guns are few and far between in Japan, which has strict gun restrictions and very little gun-related violence.  (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)
  • In this photo taken Friday, Jan. 18, 2013, a Japanese shotgun enthusiast takes a test to renew his license on a shooting range in Ooi at the foot of Mount Fuji, west of Tokyo. Guns are few and far between in Japan, which has strict gun restrictions and very little gun-related violence.  (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)
  • In this photo taken Friday, Jan. 18, 2013, a Japanese shotgun enthusiast takes a test to renew his license on a shooting range in Ooi, at the foot of Mount Fuji, west of Tokyo. Guns are few and far between in Japan, which has strict gun restrictions and very little gun-related violence.  (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)
  • In this photo taken Friday, Jan. 18, 2013, a Japanese shotgun enthusiast takes a test to renew his license on a shooting range in Ooi, at the foot of Mount Fuji, west of Tokyo. Guns are few and far between in Japan, which has strict gun restrictions and very little gun-related violence.  (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)
  • In this Friday, Jan. 18, 2013 photo, a Japanese shotgun enthusiast takes a test to renew his license on a shooting range in Ooi, at the foot of Mount Fuji. In this country, guns are few and far between. And so is gun violence. Guns were used in only seven murders in Japan - a nation of about 130 million - in all of 2011, the most recent year for official statistics. According to police, more people - nine - were murdered with scissors. (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)

After a tragedy like the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, the statistic is always trotted out. Compared with just about anywhere else with a stable, developed government – and many countries without even that – the more than 11,000 gun-related killings each year in the United States are simply off the charts.

To be sure, there are nations that are worse. But others see fewer gun homicide deaths in one year than the 27 people killed Dec. 14 in Newtown, Conn.

As Americans debate gun laws, people on both sides point to the experiences of other countries to support their arguments. Here’s a look at two success stories – with two very different ways of thinking about gun ownership – and one cautionary tale.

Japan: The nanny state

Gunfire rings through the hills at a shooting range at the foot of Mount Fuji. There are few other places in Japan where you’ll hear it.

In this country, guns are few and far between. And so is gun violence. Guns were used in only seven murders in Japan – a nation of about 130 million – in all of 2011, the most recent year for official statistics. According to the police, more people – nine – were murdered with scissors.

Though its gun ownership rates are tiny compared with the United States, Japan has more than 120,000 registered gun owners and more than 400,000 registered firearms. So why is there so little gun violence?

“We have a very different way of looking at guns in Japan than people in the United States,” said Tsutomu Uchida, who runs the Kanagawa Ohi Shooting Range, an Olympic-style training center for rifle enthusiasts. “In the U.S., people believe they have a right to own a gun. In Japan, we don’t have that right. So our point of departure is completely different.”

Treating gun ownership as a privilege and not a right leads to some important policy differences.

First, anyone who wants to get a gun must demonstrate a valid reason why they should be allowed to do so. Under long-standing Japanese policy, there is no good reason why any civilian should have a handgun, so – aside from a few dozen accomplished competitive shooters – they are completely banned.

Rifle ownership is allowed for the general public, but tightly controlled.

Applicants first must go to their local police station and declare their intent. After a lecture and a written test comes range training, then a background check. The police likely will even talk to the applicant’s neighbors to see if he or she is known to have a temper, financial troubles or an unstable household. A doctor must sign a form saying the applicant has not been institutionalized and is not epileptic, depressed, schizophrenic, alcoholic or addicted to drugs.

Gun owners must tell the police where in the home the gun will be stored. It must be kept under lock and key, must be kept separate from ammunition and preferably chained down. It’s legal to transport a gun in the trunk of a car to get to one of the country’s few shooting ranges, but if the driver steps away from the vehicle and gets caught, that’s a violation.

Switzerland: Guns and peace

Gun-rights advocates in the United States often cite Switzerland as an example of relatively liberal regulation going hand-in-hand with low gun crime.

The country’s 8 million people own about 2.3 million firearms. But firearms were used in just 24 Swiss homicides in 2009, a rate of about 0.3 per 100,000 inhabitants. The U.S. rate that year was about 11 times higher.

Unlike in the United States, where guns are used in the majority of murders, in Switzerland only a quarter of murders involve firearms. The most high-profile case in recent years occurred when a disgruntled petitioner shot dead 14 people at a city council meeting in 2001.

Experts say Switzerland’s low gun-crime figures are influenced by the fact that most firearms are military rifles issued to men when they join the country’s conscript army. Criminologist Martin Killias at the University of Zurich notes that as Switzerland cut the size of its army in recent decades, gun violence – particularly domestic killings and suicides – dropped too.

Brazil: Beyond repair?

So how about a country that actually bans guns? Since 2003, Brazil has come close to fitting that description. Only the police, people in high-risk professions and those who can prove their lives are threatened are eligible to receive gun permits. Anyone caught carrying a weapon without a permit faces up to four years in prison.

But Brazil also tops the global list for gun murders.

According to a 2011 study by the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime, 34,678 people were murdered by firearms in Brazil in 2008, compared with 34,147 in 2007. The numbers for both years represent a homicide-by-firearm rate of 18 per 100,000 inhabitants – more than five times higher than the U.S. rate.

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