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Green thumb? Washington state looking for marijuana expert

  • Khurshid Khoja, left, an attorney with San Francisco based Greenbridge Corporate Counsel, asks a question as he sits with marijuana cultivation expert Ed Rosenthal, right, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, in Tacoma, Wash., as they attend an information session put on by Washington's Liquor Control Board for people interested in bidding for consultant contracts with the state to advise on the implementation of legal marijuana use, which was passed into law by voters in 2012. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

    Khurshid Khoja, left, an attorney with San Francisco based Greenbridge Corporate Counsel, asks a question as he sits with marijuana cultivation expert Ed Rosenthal, right, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, in Tacoma, Wash., as they attend an information session put on by Washington's Liquor Control Board for people interested in bidding for consultant contracts with the state to advise on the implementation of legal marijuana use, which was passed into law by voters in 2012. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

  • Bill Thomas, of Clarkston, Wash., wears a large hemp necklace Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, in Tacoma, Wash., as he attends an information session put on by Washington's Liquor Control Board for people interested in bidding for consultant contracts with the state to advise on the implementation of legal marijuana use, which was passed into law by voters in 2012. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

    Bill Thomas, of Clarkston, Wash., wears a large hemp necklace Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, in Tacoma, Wash., as he attends an information session put on by Washington's Liquor Control Board for people interested in bidding for consultant contracts with the state to advise on the implementation of legal marijuana use, which was passed into law by voters in 2012. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

  • John Farley, a procurement coordinator with the Washington state Liquor Control Board, speaks Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, in Tacoma, Wash., at an information session for people interested in bidding for consultant contracts with the state to advise on the implementation of legal marijuana use, which was passed into law by voters in 2012. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

    John Farley, a procurement coordinator with the Washington state Liquor Control Board, speaks Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, in Tacoma, Wash., at an information session for people interested in bidding for consultant contracts with the state to advise on the implementation of legal marijuana use, which was passed into law by voters in 2012. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

  • John Farley, a procurement coordinator with the Washington state Liquor Control Board, speaks Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, in Tacoma, Wash., at an information session for people interested in bidding for consultant contracts with the state to advise on the implementation of legal marijuana use, which was passed into law by voters in 2012. Listening at left is David Lampach, president and Co-Founder of Steep Hill Lab, a medical marijuana testing facility in California. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

    John Farley, a procurement coordinator with the Washington state Liquor Control Board, speaks Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, in Tacoma, Wash., at an information session for people interested in bidding for consultant contracts with the state to advise on the implementation of legal marijuana use, which was passed into law by voters in 2012. Listening at left is David Lampach, president and Co-Founder of Steep Hill Lab, a medical marijuana testing facility in California. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

  • Khurshid Khoja, left, an attorney with San Francisco based Greenbridge Corporate Counsel, asks a question as he sits with marijuana cultivation expert Ed Rosenthal, right, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, in Tacoma, Wash., as they attend an information session put on by Washington's Liquor Control Board for people interested in bidding for consultant contracts with the state to advise on the implementation of legal marijuana use, which was passed into law by voters in 2012. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
  • Bill Thomas, of Clarkston, Wash., wears a large hemp necklace Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, in Tacoma, Wash., as he attends an information session put on by Washington's Liquor Control Board for people interested in bidding for consultant contracts with the state to advise on the implementation of legal marijuana use, which was passed into law by voters in 2012. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
  • John Farley, a procurement coordinator with the Washington state Liquor Control Board, speaks Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, in Tacoma, Wash., at an information session for people interested in bidding for consultant contracts with the state to advise on the implementation of legal marijuana use, which was passed into law by voters in 2012. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
  • John Farley, a procurement coordinator with the Washington state Liquor Control Board, speaks Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, in Tacoma, Wash., at an information session for people interested in bidding for consultant contracts with the state to advise on the implementation of legal marijuana use, which was passed into law by voters in 2012. Listening at left is David Lampach, president and Co-Founder of Steep Hill Lab, a medical marijuana testing facility in California. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

Wanted: A green thumb with extensive knowledge of the black, or at least gray, market.

As Washington state tries to figure out how to regulate its newly legal marijuana, officials are hiring an adviser on all things weed: how it’s best grown, dried, tested, labeled, packaged and cooked into brownies.

Sporting a mix of flannel, ponytails and suits, dozens of those angling for the job turned out yesterday for a forum in Tacoma, Wash., several of them from out of state. The Liquor Control Board, the agency charged with developing rules for the marijuana industry, reserved a convention center hall for a state bidding expert to take questions about the position and the hiring process.

“Since it’s not unlikely with this audience, would a felony conviction preclude you from this contract?” asked Rose Habib, an analytical chemist from a marijuana testing lab.

The answer: It depends. A pot-related conviction is probably fine, but a “heinous felony,” not so much, said John Farley, of the Liquor Control Board.

Washington and Colorado last fall became the first states to pass laws legalizing the recreational use of marijuana and setting up systems of state-licensed growers, processors and retail stores where adults over 21 can walk in and buy up to an ounce of heavily taxed cannabis.

Both states are working to develop rules for the emerging pot industry. Up in the air is everything from how many growers and stores there should be, to how the marijuana should be tested to ensure people don’t get sick.

Sales are due to begin in Washington state in December.

Washington’s Liquor Control Board has a long and “very good” history with licensing and regulation, spokesman Mikhail Carpenter said.

“But there are some technical aspects with marijuana we could use a consultant to help us with,” Carpenter said.

The board has advertised for consulting services in four categories. The first is “product and industry knowledge,” and the others cover quality testing, statistical analysis of how much marijuana the state’s licensed growers should produce; and the development of regulations, a category that requires a “strong understanding of state, local or federal government processes,” with a law degree preferred.

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