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Concord concert to benefit juvenile diabetes research

Matt and Connor Poirier perform at the first annual Juvenile Diabetes Research Benefit Concert last year in Concord. They've prepared another duet for this year's concert, scheduled for Saturday night, where they hope to raise between $8,000 and $10,000 for juvenile diabetes research.

Matt and Connor Poirier perform at the first annual Juvenile Diabetes Research Benefit Concert last year in Concord. They've prepared another duet for this year's concert, scheduled for Saturday night, where they hope to raise between $8,000 and $10,000 for juvenile diabetes research.

Looking for some live music tomorrow night? Tasty treats and a chance to bid on some bunk beds?

You can find all that and more at the second annual fundraising concert held by a local father, trying to raise money to find a cure for juvenile diabetes.

Three years ago Connor Poirier, 5, was diagnosed with juvenile diabetes, and his father, Matt Poirier of Concord, found his inner activist. Last year, he and friend Eric Marsh arranged a concert for Poirier’s band inside Marsh’s gym, Fun Intelligent Training on Henniker Street. The event raised about $4,000 for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. This year, the guys are hoping to double their results.

Tickets for the concert, which is scheduled to start at 6 p.m., are $25, and include free hors d’oeuvres, chair massages and access to a silent auction. The 100 items up for bidding include a set of wooden bunk beds, a scenic plane ride over the Lakes Region and Boston as well as gift certificates to local businesses.

Marsh is also hosting a seminar with a kettlebell fitness instructor for $75 on Sunday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and a CPR and AED certification course Feb. 23, for $35.

The proceeds of those events, as well as fundraisers throughout the month at Uno’s in Concord, will go to the diabetes research foundation.

But only concert-goers will get to see the star of the show, the boy who started it all, Connor, sing on the main stage with his father’s band. The song is a surprise, Poirier said, but Connor’s been practicing and is ready to reprise his role from last year, when he brought tears to the eyes of the audience with his rendition of “Wonderful (The Way I Feel).”

“I really feel that I didn’t choose this, but this cause chose me when Connor was diagnosed,” Poirier said. “I’ve been a musician for quite a while now, and I’m hopeful that someday they can find a cure for him and I’m just trying to do my part. Music is the best way I have to get people together, and the rest is people coming together out of the goodness of their hearts.”

SARAH PALERMO

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