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Residents throughout the Northeast hunker down for storm

  • A woman crosses Congress Street during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond.  (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

    A woman crosses Congress Street during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

  • A woman crosses Congress Street during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond.  (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

    A woman crosses Congress Street during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

  • Guy McChesney pulls Lucas McChesney and Nico Doyle on a sled up Munjoy Hill during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

    Guy McChesney pulls Lucas McChesney and Nico Doyle on a sled up Munjoy Hill during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

  • Guy McChesney pulls Lucas McChesney and Nico Doyle on a sled up Munjoy Hill during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

    Guy McChesney pulls Lucas McChesney and Nico Doyle on a sled up Munjoy Hill during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

  • Snow-covered cars sit in a parking lot adjacent to where firefighters battle a 4-alarm fire in a 3-story apartment building in Wilmington, Mass., Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. A major winter storm is well under way in the U.S. Northeast with up to 2 feet of snow expected for a Boston-anchored region that has seen mostly bare ground this winter.  (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

    Snow-covered cars sit in a parking lot adjacent to where firefighters battle a 4-alarm fire in a 3-story apartment building in Wilmington, Mass., Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. A major winter storm is well under way in the U.S. Northeast with up to 2 feet of snow expected for a Boston-anchored region that has seen mostly bare ground this winter. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

  • Snow-covered cars sit in a parking lot adjacent to where firefighters battle a 4-alarm fire in a 3-story apartment building in Wilmington, Mass., Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. A major winter storm is well under way in the U.S. Northeast with up to 2 feet of snow expected for a Boston-anchored region that has seen mostly bare ground this winter.  (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

    Snow-covered cars sit in a parking lot adjacent to where firefighters battle a 4-alarm fire in a 3-story apartment building in Wilmington, Mass., Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. A major winter storm is well under way in the U.S. Northeast with up to 2 feet of snow expected for a Boston-anchored region that has seen mostly bare ground this winter. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

  • A dog pulls a snowboarder through the Boston Common in Boston, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

    A dog pulls a snowboarder through the Boston Common in Boston, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

  • A dog pulls a snowboarder through the Boston Common in Boston, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

    A dog pulls a snowboarder through the Boston Common in Boston, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

  • Private contractors working for the N.J. Dept. of Transportation wait for the snow to start falling as 13 tracks are lined up just off exit 3 on Rt. 78 in Greenwich, N.J., Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Rich Schultz)

    Private contractors working for the N.J. Dept. of Transportation wait for the snow to start falling as 13 tracks are lined up just off exit 3 on Rt. 78 in Greenwich, N.J., Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Rich Schultz)

  • Private contractors working for the N.J. Dept. of Transportation wait for the snow to start falling as 13 trucks are lined up just off exit 3 on Rt. 78 in Greenwich, N.J., Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Rich Schultz)

    Private contractors working for the N.J. Dept. of Transportation wait for the snow to start falling as 13 trucks are lined up just off exit 3 on Rt. 78 in Greenwich, N.J., Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Rich Schultz)

  • A vehicle moves down a nearly empty highway as a sign warns of a snow emergency at the entrance to the Ted Williams Tunnel, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said.  (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

    A vehicle moves down a nearly empty highway as a sign warns of a snow emergency at the entrance to the Ted Williams Tunnel, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

  • A vehicle moves down a nearly empty highway as a sign warns of a snow emergency at the entrance to the Ted Williams Tunnel, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said.  (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

    A vehicle moves down a nearly empty highway as a sign warns of a snow emergency at the entrance to the Ted Williams Tunnel, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

  • A couple walks down the illuminated, snow-covered Commonwealth Avenue Mall in Boston, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

    A couple walks down the illuminated, snow-covered Commonwealth Avenue Mall in Boston, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

  • A couple walks down the illuminated, snow-covered Commonwealth Avenue Mall in Boston, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

    A couple walks down the illuminated, snow-covered Commonwealth Avenue Mall in Boston, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

  • A snow plow clears the paths in the Boston Commons,  Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston.Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

    A snow plow clears the paths in the Boston Commons, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston.Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

  • Joggers run around the Boston Commons after a ban on vehicles went into effect at 4:00 p.m.  Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

    Joggers run around the Boston Commons after a ban on vehicles went into effect at 4:00 p.m. Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

  • Joggers run around the Boston Commons after a ban on vehicles went into effect at 4:00 p.m.  Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

    Joggers run around the Boston Commons after a ban on vehicles went into effect at 4:00 p.m. Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

  • A snow plow clears the paths in the Boston Commons,  Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston.Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

    A snow plow clears the paths in the Boston Commons, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston.Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

  • A man crosses a traffic-less Tremont street in downtown Boston at rush hour, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said.  (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

    A man crosses a traffic-less Tremont street in downtown Boston at rush hour, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

  • A man crosses a traffic-less Tremont street in downtown Boston at rush hour, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said.  (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

    A man crosses a traffic-less Tremont street in downtown Boston at rush hour, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

  • A man crosses a traffic-less Tremont street in downtown Boston at rush hour, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said.  (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

    A man crosses a traffic-less Tremont street in downtown Boston at rush hour, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

  • A snow plow clears the paths in the Boston Commons,  Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston.Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

    A snow plow clears the paths in the Boston Commons, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston.Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

  • A woman crosses Congress Street during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond.  (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
  • A woman crosses Congress Street during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond.  (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
  • Guy McChesney pulls Lucas McChesney and Nico Doyle on a sled up Munjoy Hill during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
  • Guy McChesney pulls Lucas McChesney and Nico Doyle on a sled up Munjoy Hill during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
  • Snow-covered cars sit in a parking lot adjacent to where firefighters battle a 4-alarm fire in a 3-story apartment building in Wilmington, Mass., Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. A major winter storm is well under way in the U.S. Northeast with up to 2 feet of snow expected for a Boston-anchored region that has seen mostly bare ground this winter.  (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
  • Snow-covered cars sit in a parking lot adjacent to where firefighters battle a 4-alarm fire in a 3-story apartment building in Wilmington, Mass., Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. A major winter storm is well under way in the U.S. Northeast with up to 2 feet of snow expected for a Boston-anchored region that has seen mostly bare ground this winter.  (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
  • A dog pulls a snowboarder through the Boston Common in Boston, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
  • A dog pulls a snowboarder through the Boston Common in Boston, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
  • Private contractors working for the N.J. Dept. of Transportation wait for the snow to start falling as 13 tracks are lined up just off exit 3 on Rt. 78 in Greenwich, N.J., Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Rich Schultz)
  • Private contractors working for the N.J. Dept. of Transportation wait for the snow to start falling as 13 trucks are lined up just off exit 3 on Rt. 78 in Greenwich, N.J., Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Rich Schultz)
  • A vehicle moves down a nearly empty highway as a sign warns of a snow emergency at the entrance to the Ted Williams Tunnel, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said.  (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
  • A vehicle moves down a nearly empty highway as a sign warns of a snow emergency at the entrance to the Ted Williams Tunnel, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said.  (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
  • A couple walks down the illuminated, snow-covered Commonwealth Avenue Mall in Boston, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
  • A couple walks down the illuminated, snow-covered Commonwealth Avenue Mall in Boston, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
  • A snow plow clears the paths in the Boston Commons,  Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston.Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
  • Joggers run around the Boston Commons after a ban on vehicles went into effect at 4:00 p.m.  Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
  • Joggers run around the Boston Commons after a ban on vehicles went into effect at 4:00 p.m.  Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
  • A snow plow clears the paths in the Boston Commons,  Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston.Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
  • A man crosses a traffic-less Tremont street in downtown Boston at rush hour, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said.  (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
  • A man crosses a traffic-less Tremont street in downtown Boston at rush hour, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said.  (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
  • A man crosses a traffic-less Tremont street in downtown Boston at rush hour, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said.  (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
  • A snow plow clears the paths in the Boston Commons,  Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston.Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

Residents throughout the Northeast steeled themselves yesterday for a blizzard that brought gusty winds, coastal flooding potential and the possibility of as much as 3 feet of snow to the eastern part of the state.

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m., saying the storm posed “extremely dangerous conditions” with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at its height.

The Massachusetts travel ban, believed to be the first of its kind since the blizzard of 1978, provides exceptions including public works and public safety employees, utility workers and members of the news media. Patrick said it was not to punish drivers, but to make sure emergency workers and plowing crews have access to the roads. Emergency management officials said people were observing the ban.

Emergency workers at the ready included 2,000 utility crews to deal with power outages, Patrick said.

Boston and much of eastern Massachusetts were under a blizzard warning until 1 p.m. today. A flood warning was in effect until noon today for the state’s east-facing coastline, with the worst conditions expected thismorning.

Boston was among the cities closing schools and declaring snow emergencies and parking bans.

“This is a storm of major proportions,” Mayor Thomas Menino said. “Stay off the roads. Stay home.”

Stores throughout the region were packed with people buying food, shovels, batteries and other storm supplies.

At a Stop & Shop supermarket in Whitman, Mass., bread, milk and bundles of firewood were nearly gone by 9:30 a.m. yesterday. Yet some shoppers were still skeptical that the storm would be as huge as predicted.

“I just want to see if it’s going to really happen,” said Jessica Zinkevicz, 31, a certified nursing assistant from East Bridgewater who went to Stop & Shop to stock up on Diet Snapple, water and frozen vegetables.

“I’m just taking it as it comes,” she said. “Once it starts coming down hard, then I might start panicking.”

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority shut down all service – including subways, commuter trains and buses – by 3:30 p.m. State transportation officials expected service to be up and running again by Monday morning.

Boston’s Logan International Airport said it would try to stay open during the storm, but no flights were scheduled before this evening.

Predictions of 2 feet or more of snow could make the storm one of the biggest in recorded history, but an even greater concern than the snow was the possibility of a damaging storm surge.

The National Weather Service warned of moderate to major coastal flooding at high tide this morning, with a 2- to 3-foot storm surge that could damage homes, cause beach erosion and make some roads impassable.

Officials urged people in flood-prone coastal areas of Marshfield to voluntarily leave until after this morning’s high tide. Shelters were open in Marshfield, Scituate and on Cape Cod.

Revere, Sandwich Harbor and the east coast of Nantucket were considered vulnerable to major flooding, according to the weather service.

Connecticut battens down

Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy imposed a travel ban yesterdat on the state’s highways and deployed National Guard troops around the state for rescues or other emergencies.

Nonessential state workers were ordered to stay home. Schools, colleges and state courthouses were also closed. All flights after 1:30 p.m. at Bradley Airport near Hartford were canceled. Connecticut Transit planned to cease all bus service by 6 p.m. yesterday.

A coastal flood warning was posted for southern Fairfield County, saying last evening’s high tide could be 3 to 5 feet higher than normal in western Long Island Sound.

Some gas stations ran out of fuel Thursday night during the rush to prepare for the storm. The state’s two biggest utilities planned for the possibility that up to 30 percent of their customers – more than 400,000 homes and businesses – would lose power.

Traffic snarled in Maine

Maine state offices closed early yesterday as the storm that contributed to a 19-car pileup in Cumberland continued to cause trouble.

Registration and practice runs for the National Toboggan Championships were held yesterday as scheduled, but today’s races were postponed for a day.

Up to 2 feet of snow was forecast along the southern coast, with lesser amounts across the rest of the state.

R.I. closes roads

Interstate 95 and other major highways have been closed to traffic as the state braced for up to 2 feet of snow. Transportation officials warned they may close the Newport Pell and Mount Hope bridges if high winds develop.

Nonessential state workers were sent home yesterday afternoon. Many schools closed and transit service was suspended at noon yesterday. The last plane left T.F. Green Airport near Providence just before 1:30 p.m.; no other flights were scheduled to leave until today.

National Grid reported about 1,200 customers without power early yesterday evening. About 100 state plows were already out on the roads, bolstered by 200 private contractors, officials said.

Vermont shutters schools

The storm was blamed for a multiple-vehicle accident and a series of other crashes on Interstate 89 in Bolton and South Burlington. Hundreds of schools were closed.

Northern Vermont is expected to get 4 to 8 inches of snow by this morning, while central and southeastern parts of the state could get 8 to 16 inches.

Nearly 6 inches of snow had fallen by early yesterday afternoon at Mad River Glen ski area in Fayston, according to a spokesman who said a total of 18 inches was possible.

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