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PHOTOS: Young inventors

  • Olivia Morrison, a third grader from the Peter Woodbury School in Bedford, stands by her invention, the Tug 'n Guard, while waiting for any final judges at the Fidelity Investments Young Inventors' Program on March 23, 2013 at Merrimack Valley High School. Morrison placed as best in the third grade in the Most Marketable category for her dog toy with a protective cup for a person's hand. "I want to get a patent for it," she said. Over 200 children from all over the state participated in this year's event, which awarded the students in different categories and for different challenges. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    Olivia Morrison, a third grader from the Peter Woodbury School in Bedford, stands by her invention, the Tug 'n Guard, while waiting for any final judges at the Fidelity Investments Young Inventors' Program on March 23, 2013 at Merrimack Valley High School. Morrison placed as best in the third grade in the Most Marketable category for her dog toy with a protective cup for a person's hand. "I want to get a patent for it," she said. Over 200 children from all over the state participated in this year's event, which awarded the students in different categories and for different challenges.

    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • Kids react to demonstrations during the Mad Science of New Hampshire presentation. <br/><br/>Fidelity Investments Young Inventors' Program on March 23, 2013 at Merrimack Valley High School.<br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    Kids react to demonstrations during the Mad Science of New Hampshire presentation.

    Fidelity Investments Young Inventors' Program on March 23, 2013 at Merrimack Valley High School.

    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • Wesley Michaelis, a first grader from Bow Elementary School, pauses while looking at other projects. <br/><br/>Fidelity Investments Young Inventors' Program on March 23, 2013 at Merrimack Valley High School.<br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    Wesley Michaelis, a first grader from Bow Elementary School, pauses while looking at other projects.

    Fidelity Investments Young Inventors' Program on March 23, 2013 at Merrimack Valley High School.

    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • David Roy, a first grader from Thorntons Ferry in Merrimack, adjusts his invention, the Flag Flaunter, a support for "droopy flags." <br/><br/>Fidelity Investments Young Inventors' Program on March 23, 2013 at Merrimack Valley High School.<br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    David Roy, a first grader from Thorntons Ferry in Merrimack, adjusts his invention, the Flag Flaunter, a support for "droopy flags."

    Fidelity Investments Young Inventors' Program on March 23, 2013 at Merrimack Valley High School.

    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • Cayden Krupnik, a second grader from the Gilmanton School, looks down at his medal after winning the Steve Carney award for his invention, Hand Lights. <br/><br/>Fidelity Investments Young Inventors' Program on March 23, 2013 at Merrimack Valley High School.<br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    Cayden Krupnik, a second grader from the Gilmanton School, looks down at his medal after winning the Steve Carney award for his invention, Hand Lights.

    Fidelity Investments Young Inventors' Program on March 23, 2013 at Merrimack Valley High School.

    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • Ian Palleiko, a young inventor who aged out of the program, returned this year to give back to the program he loved by creating an award to recognize an invention that provides unique solutions. He gave his $52 prize in the form of an elaborate invention of his own. <br/><br/>Fidelity Investments Young Inventors' Program on March 23, 2013 at Merrimack Valley High School.<br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    Ian Palleiko, a young inventor who aged out of the program, returned this year to give back to the program he loved by creating an award to recognize an invention that provides unique solutions. He gave his $52 prize in the form of an elaborate invention of his own.

    Fidelity Investments Young Inventors' Program on March 23, 2013 at Merrimack Valley High School.

    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • Olivia Morrison, a third grader from the Peter Woodbury School in Bedford, stands by her invention, the Tug 'n Guard, while waiting for any final judges at the Fidelity Investments Young Inventors' Program on March 23, 2013 at Merrimack Valley High School. Morrison placed as best in the third grade in the Most Marketable category for her dog toy with a protective cup for a person's hand. "I want to get a patent for it," she said. Over 200 children from all over the state participated in this year's event, which awarded the students in different categories and for different challenges. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)
  • Kids react to demonstrations during the Mad Science of New Hampshire presentation. <br/><br/>Fidelity Investments Young Inventors' Program on March 23, 2013 at Merrimack Valley High School.<br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)
  • Wesley Michaelis, a first grader from Bow Elementary School, pauses while looking at other projects. <br/><br/>Fidelity Investments Young Inventors' Program on March 23, 2013 at Merrimack Valley High School.<br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)
  • David Roy, a first grader from Thorntons Ferry in Merrimack, adjusts his invention, the Flag Flaunter, a support for "droopy flags." <br/><br/>Fidelity Investments Young Inventors' Program on March 23, 2013 at Merrimack Valley High School.<br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)
  • Cayden Krupnik, a second grader from the Gilmanton School, looks down at his medal after winning the Steve Carney award for his invention, Hand Lights. <br/><br/>Fidelity Investments Young Inventors' Program on March 23, 2013 at Merrimack Valley High School.<br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)
  • Ian Palleiko, a young inventor who aged out of the program, returned this year to give back to the program he loved by creating an award to recognize an invention that provides unique solutions. He gave his $52 prize in the form of an elaborate invention of his own. <br/><br/>Fidelity Investments Young Inventors' Program on March 23, 2013 at Merrimack Valley High School.<br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

More than 200 children from across the state participated in this year’s Fidelity Investments Young Inventors’ Program held at Merrimack Valley High School. The program awarded students in different categories and for different challenges.

Legacy Comments4

Not so. There were almost 250 inventions this year. Awards included the Medical Award ($100), the Electrical Award (also a cash award, presented by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers), Most Creative, and Best in Grade. Each student has to win their local invention competition to qualify for the Fidelity state event, but most leave this event with no additional reward beyond the experience itself. The judges are professionals in the field of science who travel from all over New England to volunteer their time judging the inventions and providing the inventors with insight and feedback. Luckily, the Academy of Applied Science, their sponsors, the participating schools, teachers, parents, and students are all are a lot more optimistic about our children's potential --and resilience-- than you are.

Quote....The program awarded students in different categories and for different challenges......any one want to bet that the liberal teachers gave 100% of the children some award

Not so. There were almost 250 inventions this year. Awards included the Medical Award ($100), the Electrical Award (also a cash award, presented by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers), Most Creative, and Best in Grade. Each student has to win their local invention competition to qualify for the Fidelity state event, but most leave this event with no additional reward beyond the experience itself. The judges are professionals in the field of science who travel from all over New England to volunteer their time judging the inventions and providing the inventors with insight and feedback. Luckily, the Academy of Applied Science, their sponsors, the participating schools, teachers, parents, and students are all are a lot more optimistic about our children's potential --and resilience-- than you are.

sarcasm is effective when it is believable

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