Clear
39°
Clear
Hi 63° | Lo 41°

Fallen Greenland police chief honored at 160th New Hampshire Police Academy graduation

  • Family members gather near the stage to get photos of graduating officers during the 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    Family members gather near the stage to get photos of graduating officers during the 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013.

    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • Patrol officer Christy Atkinson of the Claremont Police Department, center, salutes during the National Anthem along with the other members of the 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy class during their graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    Patrol officer Christy Atkinson of the Claremont Police Department, center, salutes during the National Anthem along with the other members of the 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy class during their graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013.

    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • Greenland police chief Tara Laurent takes a moment of silence following the closing benediction during the 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013. Laurent and other members of the Greenland Police Department attended the ceremony where their former chief Michael Maloney was honored following the one year anniversary of his shooting death. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    Greenland police chief Tara Laurent takes a moment of silence following the closing benediction during the 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013. Laurent and other members of the Greenland Police Department attended the ceremony where their former chief Michael Maloney was honored following the one year anniversary of his shooting death.

    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • Members of the audience applaud following Governor Maggie Hassan's address at the 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    Members of the audience applaud following Governor Maggie Hassan's address at the 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013.

    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • Officer Micah Jones of the New Hampshire State Police pauses while delivering the class expression during the 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013. Jones was chosen by his classmates for the task of delivering the speech that emphasized seizing the day.<br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    Officer Micah Jones of the New Hampshire State Police pauses while delivering the class expression during the 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013. Jones was chosen by his classmates for the task of delivering the speech that emphasized seizing the day.

    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • Nicholas Iannone, of the New Hampshire State Police, walks up to receive his award during the 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    Nicholas Iannone, of the New Hampshire State Police, walks up to receive his award during the 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013.

    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • The 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    The 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013.

    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • Members of the Greenland Police Department take a moment of silence following the closing benediction at 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013. It's been a year since the shooting death of former police chief Michael Maloney during a search. The graduating class raised $1000 to donate a fund in the chief's name created to help family members of police officers killed or injured in the line of duty. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    Members of the Greenland Police Department take a moment of silence following the closing benediction at 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013. It's been a year since the shooting death of former police chief Michael Maloney during a search. The graduating class raised $1000 to donate a fund in the chief's name created to help family members of police officers killed or injured in the line of duty.

    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • Family members gather near the stage to get photos of graduating officers during the 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)
  • Patrol officer Christy Atkinson of the Claremont Police Department, center, salutes during the National Anthem along with the other members of the 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy class during their graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)
  • Greenland police chief Tara Laurent takes a moment of silence following the closing benediction during the 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013. Laurent and other members of the Greenland Police Department attended the ceremony where their former chief Michael Maloney was honored following the one year anniversary of his shooting death. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)
  • Members of the audience applaud following Governor Maggie Hassan's address at the 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)
  • Officer Micah Jones of the New Hampshire State Police pauses while delivering the class expression during the 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013. Jones was chosen by his classmates for the task of delivering the speech that emphasized seizing the day.<br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)
  • Nicholas Iannone, of the New Hampshire State Police, walks up to receive his award during the 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)
  • The 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)
  • Members of the Greenland Police Department take a moment of silence following the closing benediction at 160th New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council Academy graduation at NHTI in Concord on April 12, 2013. It's been a year since the shooting death of former police chief Michael Maloney during a search. The graduating class raised $1000 to donate a fund in the chief's name created to help family members of police officers killed or injured in the line of duty. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

The graduation ceremony of the 160th New Hampshire Police Academy yesterday was a celebration also tinted with sadness, as it fell on the one-year anniversary of Greenland police Chief Michael Maloney’s death in the line of duty. But marking the anniversary of Maloney’s death also gave the newest class of officers a chance to reflect on what being a police officer means to them.

“I think that every single one us, when we wake up in the morning and are here, we think about (how) we want (to walk in) the steps of Chief Maloney and officers like that,” said Bryan Kydd-Keeler, an academy graduate from the Tilton Police Department. “It’s a privilege to even be associated in the same line of work and the same career as them. Everyday when I put on a uniform, that’s something I’m going to strive toward.”

Maloney was killed during a raid on a drug dealer’s home April 12, 2012. He had moved his cruiser to shield four injured officers, and was shot as he looked over the front fender.

“We will never forget his heroism on that day as he helped rescue his fellow wounded officers,” Gov. Maggie Hassan said during her remarks.

After honoring Maloney, Hassan turned her attention to the 51 graduates of the 14-week police academy. She and several other speakers praised their dedication and commitment to the safety of New Hampshire and thanked their families for the sacrifices they have made and will continue to make so their loved ones can protect their communities.

“You are all true leaders in your community, shining examples of dedication and service and steadfast stewards to the future of our state,” Hassan said.

Graduate Micah Jones of the New Hampshire State Police was the class’s chosen speaker, and he focused on the pride the graduates have in their work and in each other.

“Even at the very beginning, the biggest thing we all had in common was very clear: We were all proud to be here and we all had people who were proud of us for getting here,” he said.

Pride can sometimes have negative connotations and be associated with arrogance, he said. But for the graduates of the 160th police academy, who are a diverse group from different backgrounds, it means “recognizing who we are, where we come from and why we do what we do.”

By working hard in the classroom, training sessions and all other aspects of the police academy, the group was bonded together by pride, he said. He left the group with a thought that in many ways related back to the anniversary of Maloney’s death.

“One truth that we all must acknowledge is that tomorrow is never guaranteed,” he said. “With that in mind, we should seize every moment and remember that anything worth doing is worth doing well.”

The group also presented a $1,000 donation to the Greenland Police Department to go toward a memorial fund in Maloney’s name, which provides relief for families of officers killed or injured on the job.

Tara Laurent, chief of the Greenland Police Department, said it was humbling to receive the donation and to hear people honor Maloney and his commitment to the community. He died doing what he loved, she said, and the day’s events reminded the department that he will not be forgotten.

The year since Maloney’s death has been full of emotions for the Greenland officers, she said.

“We’ve had good times and then one small little thing happens and it dips down, but what we’ve relied upon is when one person is having a difficult time, the others are feeling strong, hopefully, and supportive. So it really has been a roller coaster, and today is just the same,” she said.

Outgoing Attorney General Michael Delaney was also honored by the graduates. In a speech, he congratulated them for passing through one of the “most important milestones” of their law enforcement careers. He also gave them each a pocket copy of the state Constitution and reminded them that they must faithfully honor it.

“We have entrusted you to ensure that we all live by this document,” he said.

For Michael Carpenter, a graduate from the Bow Police Department, protecting others and keeping the community safe is a responsibility he is honored to take on. Making the decision to put one’s life on the line is difficult, he said, but what he can provide for the community is worth it.

“It’s a tough decision to decide to come to work every day where you can get hurt and be away from your family, to give those things to people that you don’t know,” he said. “But it’s something that I think is important, and I think it’s a proud moment for me right now to be here to be able to do this.”

(Kathleen Ronayne can be reached at 369-3309 or
kronayne@cmonitor.com or on Twitter @kronayne.)

Legacy Comments1

While his actions were heroic, the initial action of the raid was anything but. Hopefully, this sort of raid will not be conducted in the same manner in the future.

Post a Comment

You must be registered to comment on stories. Click here to register.