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Bearcat versus BearCat: Wild creature against armored vehicle, who wins? 

  •  The Concord Police Department submitted a federal grant application for a BearCat armored law enforcement vehicle, like this one being used in Nashville, Tenn.

    The Concord Police Department submitted a federal grant application for a BearCat armored law enforcement vehicle, like this one being used in Nashville, Tenn.

  • A bearcat in the wild.

    A bearcat in the wild.

  •  The Concord Police Department submitted a federal grant application for a BearCat armored law enforcement vehicle, like this one being used in Nashville, Tenn.
  • A bearcat in the wild.

The animal

Formal name: Binturong

Size: 2-3 feet long; 30-60 pounds.

Home: South and Southeast Asia; zoos

Distribution: Rare; population in decline by over 30 percent in 30 years

Body: Long and heavy, low on the legs. Thick fur of strong black hair. Prehensile tale. Face like a cat, body like a bear, shaggy black hair, stiff white whiskers.

Habitat: tall forests.

Mobility: They climb trees, slowly and steadily.

Sounds: Growls, grunts, hissing

Diet: Small mammals, birds, fish, worms, insects, fruits.

Threat: Deforestation

The vehicle

Formal name: Ballistic Engineered Armored Response Counter Attack Truck.

Size: 16,500-17,550 pounds; 20 feet long; 10 feet wide; 8-12 feet high.

Home: Manufactured by Massachusetts-based Lenco Industries.

Distribution: More than 5,000 BearCats in use in more than 40 countries.

Body: armored vehicle, emergency lights/sirens, rotating roof hatch, optional powered turrets

Habitat: Police, military units, perhaps including Concord

Mobility: 75-90 mph

Sounds: Sirens

Diet: diesel fuel

Threat: hostage incidents, armed offenders.

Legacy Comments3

Lighten up! What with chemical weapons killing innocent people in foreign lands and gun toting anti-government Tea Bag rallies within city limits of our own fair city, I need a little comic relief! Humor is a good refuge for these difficult issues we face. If the Bearcat meets the Bearcat wasn't so silly a distraction, I would be crying.

I congratulate you if you found any humor in the Bearcat versus bearcat feature. You have a sharper eye than I if you found even a weak smile in there. Do you normally read the phone book for entertainment? My comment was made as a suggestion to the paper's editors that their grip on their current audience isn't ironclad, and the audience they're courting is fickle, and tends to expect free product. If they can't capture this new audience, or discover a way to make them pay, it could be a very cold winter on Monitor Drive. Finally, I think you, and many others, need to lighten up. You seem to be carrying the world's burdens on your shoulders, and all you'll get from that is a humpback. Read some American history and you'll see that things have been much worse, and still we muddled through. Hey, what a great motto for a political party: "We'll muddle through!" I'd vote for them, maybe twice if Grant Bosse didn't catch me.

I thought The Insiders column was as low as you could go, but you have successfully lowered the bar with this "BearCat meets bearcat" feature. Can you share what the purpose of this feature might have been? I understand the Monitor wants to attract a younger audience, but have you noted that the younger audience is reluctant to purchase subscriptions, or pay for content in any fashion for that matter. Good luck with making your fortune on clicks.

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