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PHOTOS: Butterfly Festival at Petals in the Pines in Canterbury

  • A developing butterfly, found by students at Belmont Elementary School, rests in its chrysalis at Petals in the Pines in Canterbury during the annual Butterfly Festival.<br/><br/>(WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)

    A developing butterfly, found by students at Belmont Elementary School, rests in its chrysalis at Petals in the Pines in Canterbury during the annual Butterfly Festival.

    (WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)

  • Kaelyn Schmidt, 5, of Concord, examines monarch butterfly eggs on a milkweed leaf while her brother Brennan, 2, gets a look at a butterfly flip book.<br/><br/>(WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)

    Kaelyn Schmidt, 5, of Concord, examines monarch butterfly eggs on a milkweed leaf while her brother Brennan, 2, gets a look at a butterfly flip book.

    (WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)

  • Donna Miller of Canterbury stands with Butterfly Festival volunteer Aaron Kinne in her "Monarch Maternity Ward" garden, which is stocked with monarch-friendly plants such as milkweed, brown-eyed Susan and coneflower.<br/><br/>(WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)

    Donna Miller of Canterbury stands with Butterfly Festival volunteer Aaron Kinne in her "Monarch Maternity Ward" garden, which is stocked with monarch-friendly plants such as milkweed, brown-eyed Susan and coneflower.

    (WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)

  • A developing butterfly, found by students at Belmont Elementary School, rests in its chrysalis at Petals in the Pines in Canterbury during the annual Butterfly Festival.<br/><br/>(WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)

    A developing butterfly, found by students at Belmont Elementary School, rests in its chrysalis at Petals in the Pines in Canterbury during the annual Butterfly Festival.

    (WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)

  • Kaelyn Schmidt, 5, of Concord, examines monarch butterfly eggs on a milkweed leaf while her brother Brennan, 2, gets a look at a butterfly flip book.<br/><br/>(WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)

    Kaelyn Schmidt, 5, of Concord, examines monarch butterfly eggs on a milkweed leaf while her brother Brennan, 2, gets a look at a butterfly flip book.

    (WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)

  • Donna Miller of Canterbury stands with Butterfly Festival volunteer Aaron Kinne in her "Monarch Maternity Ward" garden, which is stocked with monarch-friendly plants such as milkweed, brown-eyed Susan and coneflower.<br/><br/>(WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)

    Donna Miller of Canterbury stands with Butterfly Festival volunteer Aaron Kinne in her "Monarch Maternity Ward" garden, which is stocked with monarch-friendly plants such as milkweed, brown-eyed Susan and coneflower.

    (WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)

  • A developing butterfly, found by students at Belmont Elementary School, rests in its chrysalis at Petals in the Pines in Canterbury during the annual Butterfly Festival.<br/><br/>(WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)
  • Kaelyn Schmidt, 5, of Concord, examines monarch butterfly eggs on a milkweed leaf while her brother Brennan, 2, gets a look at a butterfly flip book.<br/><br/>(WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)
  • Donna Miller of Canterbury stands with Butterfly Festival volunteer Aaron Kinne in her "Monarch Maternity Ward" garden, which is stocked with monarch-friendly plants such as milkweed, brown-eyed Susan and coneflower.<br/><br/>(WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)
  • A developing butterfly, found by students at Belmont Elementary School, rests in its chrysalis at Petals in the Pines in Canterbury during the annual Butterfly Festival.<br/><br/>(WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)
  • Kaelyn Schmidt, 5, of Concord, examines monarch butterfly eggs on a milkweed leaf while her brother Brennan, 2, gets a look at a butterfly flip book.<br/><br/>(WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)
  • Donna Miller of Canterbury stands with Butterfly Festival volunteer Aaron Kinne in her "Monarch Maternity Ward" garden, which is stocked with monarch-friendly plants such as milkweed, brown-eyed Susan and coneflower.<br/><br/>(WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)

New Hampshire has been seeing fewer monarch butterflies than in years past, but citizen scientist Donna Miller, who tags monarchs as part of the Monarch Watch network, still had a lot to offer visitors to the annual butterfly festival at Petals in the Pines in Canterbury on Saturday. Miller, whose backyard at Petals in the Pines is also a certified monarch butterfly waystation, spotted just one monarch during the festival, which received an applause from visitors as it flew overhead. “We should have been seeing monarchs for like the last month,” Miller said. She urges monarch-lovers to avoid removing milkweed from their yard, as it is the only habitat for monarch eggs and caterpillars. “And if you don’t have milkweed, plant it.”

Legacy Comments1

This has been a very tough year for Monarchs--the droughts in the Midwest and reduction in milkweed along the migration route have contributed to a 90% decline in the population. Normally, Petals in the Pines will raise, tag, and release as many as two dozen Monarchs--but only a handful of caterpillars were found in all of Canterbury this year. There were almost 300 visitors to the Festival on Saturday, so public awareness of the plight of these miraculous creatures was greatly boosted. Donna is right--please plant more milkweed!

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