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Some Northeast ski resorts open earlier than ever

  • In this Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013  photo, a snow gun makes snow at the Sugarbush resort in Warren, Vt. With the Farmers' Almanac predicting a cold, snowy winter, Northeast ski resorts are already seeing some early season snow. But they continue to invest in high-tech snow making and other improvements to draw more customers and make sure the slopes are covered longer.(AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    In this Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013 photo, a snow gun makes snow at the Sugarbush resort in Warren, Vt. With the Farmers' Almanac predicting a cold, snowy winter, Northeast ski resorts are already seeing some early season snow. But they continue to invest in high-tech snow making and other improvements to draw more customers and make sure the slopes are covered longer.(AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013  photo, a snow gun makes snow at the Sugarbush resort in Warren, Vt. With the Farmers' Almanac predicting a cold, snowy winter, Northeast ski resorts are already seeing some early season snow. But they continue to invest in high-tech snow making and other improvements to draw more customers and make sure the slopes are covered longer.(AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    In this Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013 photo, a snow gun makes snow at the Sugarbush resort in Warren, Vt. With the Farmers' Almanac predicting a cold, snowy winter, Northeast ski resorts are already seeing some early season snow. But they continue to invest in high-tech snow making and other improvements to draw more customers and make sure the slopes are covered longer.(AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013  photo, snow guns make snow at the Sugarbush resort in Warren, Vt. With the Farmers' Almanac predicting a cold, snowy winter, Northeast ski resorts are already seeing some early season snow. But they continue to invest in high-tech snow making and other improvements to draw more customers and make sure the slopes are covered longer.(AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    In this Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013 photo, snow guns make snow at the Sugarbush resort in Warren, Vt. With the Farmers' Almanac predicting a cold, snowy winter, Northeast ski resorts are already seeing some early season snow. But they continue to invest in high-tech snow making and other improvements to draw more customers and make sure the slopes are covered longer.(AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013  photo, snow guns make snow at the Sugarbush resort in Warren, Vt. With the Farmers' Almanac predicting a cold, snowy winter, Northeast ski resorts are already seeing some early season snow. But they continue to invest in high-tech snow making and other improvements to draw more customers and make sure the slopes are covered longer.(AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    In this Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013 photo, snow guns make snow at the Sugarbush resort in Warren, Vt. With the Farmers' Almanac predicting a cold, snowy winter, Northeast ski resorts are already seeing some early season snow. But they continue to invest in high-tech snow making and other improvements to draw more customers and make sure the slopes are covered longer.(AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013  photo, a snow gun makes snow at the Sugarbush resort in Warren, Vt. With the Farmers' Almanac predicting a cold, snowy winter, Northeast ski resorts are already seeing some early season snow. But they continue to invest in high-tech snow making and other improvements to draw more customers and make sure the slopes are covered longer.(AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  • In this Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013  photo, a snow gun makes snow at the Sugarbush resort in Warren, Vt. With the Farmers' Almanac predicting a cold, snowy winter, Northeast ski resorts are already seeing some early season snow. But they continue to invest in high-tech snow making and other improvements to draw more customers and make sure the slopes are covered longer.(AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  • In this Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013  photo, snow guns make snow at the Sugarbush resort in Warren, Vt. With the Farmers' Almanac predicting a cold, snowy winter, Northeast ski resorts are already seeing some early season snow. But they continue to invest in high-tech snow making and other improvements to draw more customers and make sure the slopes are covered longer.(AP Photo/Toby Talbot)
  • In this Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013  photo, snow guns make snow at the Sugarbush resort in Warren, Vt. With the Farmers' Almanac predicting a cold, snowy winter, Northeast ski resorts are already seeing some early season snow. But they continue to invest in high-tech snow making and other improvements to draw more customers and make sure the slopes are covered longer.(AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

Ski areas in the Northeast continue to pump millions of dollars in new high-tech snowmaking to draw early season skiers and riders and to ensure their slopes will remain snowy into the spring.

An early cold snap allowed resorts from Vermont to Maine to fire up snow guns in the beginning of November.

New Hampshire’s Loon Mountain opened Nov. 8, its earliest top-to-bottom opening ever, thanks to a $1.3 million investment to revamp its snowmaking.

“This season, we opened about 10 days early, which is really big for us,” said spokesman Greg Kwasnik.

In Vermont, Okemo, Mount Snow and Bromley Mountain are among the resorts that opened in mid-November.

“It’s the earliest opening that I can remember, and I’ve been here 40 years,” Bromley President Bill Cairns said.

Stowe Mountain Resort continues its major snowmaking revamp spending an additional $3.4 million on new equipment and upgrades, including 100 tower guns, three fan guns and miles of snowmaking pipe. That’s on top of $4.7 million spent last year.

Maine’s two biggest resorts – Sugarloaf and Sunday River – have installed hundreds of new energy-efficient snow guns for this season, on top of big investments in equipment in recent years.

The new high-efficiency, low-energy equipment allows the resorts to keep the slopes covered at a fraction of the energy costs.

must be Bush's fault

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