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University System of New Hampshire considers moving central offices to Concord

The University System of New Hampshire is exploring moving its administrative offices to a central Concord location.

“We’re probably several months off from any definitive decision being made,” said Tiffany Eddy, a spokeswoman for the university system.

The university system has about 70 full-time employees working in administration, legal services, finance and human resources across four offices, Eddy said. The primary offices are located at the Dunlap and Myers Centers on Concord Road in Lee. Other employees also work at two locations on the University of New Hampshire campus.

The university system oversees and provides central services for UNH, Plymouth State University, Keene State College and Granite State College. Todd Leach, president of Granite State College, was named chancellor of the university system in June.

Leach is looking at several ways to improve efficiency when it comes to space and services. Moving these offices to Concord could be one way to do that, Eddy said, but she stressed the discussions are preliminary. (There is no mention of moving offices in recent meeting minutes of the board of trustees.)

“As the new chancellor, he’s exploring all aspects of operations to see what changes, if any, would improve efficiency and effectiveness,” she said.

Relocating to Concord would have the benefit of being in a more central location to the four campuses, as well as state offices and legislative activity, Eddy said. But any move could also have disadvantages such as more workplace disruptions, she said, and the pros and cons need to be studied. At this time, they do not have a building in mind, she said.

Of the four colleges in the university system, Granite State College is located in Concord at the Gateway Center. Meeting minutes show the trustees’ financial affairs committee voted in October to purchase that building, at 25 Hall St., for $4.9 million. The money for that purchase came from campus reserves, the state’s capital budget and internal borrowing.

(Kathleen Ronayne can be reached at 369-3390 or kronayne@cmonitor.com or on Twitter @kronayne.)

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