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Poll: Health law seen as eroding coverage

  • FILE - In this Dec. 4, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks about the new health care law during a White House Youth Summit, in the South Court Auditorium in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington. Americans who already have health insurance are blaming President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul for their rising premiums and deductibles, and overall 3 in 4 say the rollout of coverage for the uninsured has gone poorly.  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

    FILE - In this Dec. 4, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks about the new health care law during a White House Youth Summit, in the South Court Auditorium in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington. Americans who already have health insurance are blaming President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul for their rising premiums and deductibles, and overall 3 in 4 say the rollout of coverage for the uninsured has gone poorly. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

  • FILE - In this Dec. 4, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks about the new health care law during a White House Youth Summit, in the South Court Auditorium in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington. Americans who already have health insurance are blaming President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul for their rising premiums and deductibles, and overall 3 in 4 say the rollout of coverage for the uninsured has gone poorly.  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

    FILE - In this Dec. 4, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks about the new health care law during a White House Youth Summit, in the South Court Auditorium in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington. Americans who already have health insurance are blaming President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul for their rising premiums and deductibles, and overall 3 in 4 say the rollout of coverage for the uninsured has gone poorly. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

  • This frame grab APTN shows an overhead shot of former South African president Nelson Mandela's casket during his funeral service Sunday, Dec. 15, 2013, in Quny, South Africa. (AP Photo/APTN)

    This frame grab APTN shows an overhead shot of former South African president Nelson Mandela's casket during his funeral service Sunday, Dec. 15, 2013, in Quny, South Africa. (AP Photo/APTN)

  • This frame grab APTN shows an overhead shot of former South African president Nelson Mandela's casket during his funeral service Sunday, Dec. 15, 2013, in Quny, South Africa. (AP Photo/APTN)

    This frame grab APTN shows an overhead shot of former South African president Nelson Mandela's casket during his funeral service Sunday, Dec. 15, 2013, in Quny, South Africa. (AP Photo/APTN)

  • CORRECTS SOURCE TO SABC -This frame grab from SABC  shows an overhead shot of former South African president Nelson Mandela's casket during his funeral service Sunday, Dec. 15, 2013, in Qunu, South Africa. (AP Photo/SABC, Pool)

    CORRECTS SOURCE TO SABC -This frame grab from SABC shows an overhead shot of former South African president Nelson Mandela's casket during his funeral service Sunday, Dec. 15, 2013, in Qunu, South Africa. (AP Photo/SABC, Pool)

  • CORRECTS SOURCE TO SABC -This frame grab from SABC  shows an overhead shot of former South African president Nelson Mandela's casket during his funeral service Sunday, Dec. 15, 2013, in Qunu, South Africa. (AP Photo/SABC, Pool)

    CORRECTS SOURCE TO SABC -This frame grab from SABC shows an overhead shot of former South African president Nelson Mandela's casket during his funeral service Sunday, Dec. 15, 2013, in Qunu, South Africa. (AP Photo/SABC, Pool)

  • FILE - This photo of part of the HealthCare.gov website is photographed in Washington, in this Nov. 29, 2013 file photo. Newly released federal figures, as of Nov. 30, 2013, show more people are picking private insurance plans or being routed to Medicaid programs in states with Democratic leaders who have fully embraced the federal health care law than in states where Republican elected officials have derisively rejected what they call "Obamacare." (AP Photo/Jon Elswick, File)

    FILE - This photo of part of the HealthCare.gov website is photographed in Washington, in this Nov. 29, 2013 file photo. Newly released federal figures, as of Nov. 30, 2013, show more people are picking private insurance plans or being routed to Medicaid programs in states with Democratic leaders who have fully embraced the federal health care law than in states where Republican elected officials have derisively rejected what they call "Obamacare." (AP Photo/Jon Elswick, File)

  • Tamas Kovacs, right, takes a swing at Beibut Shumenov, left, during their WBA Super World and IBA light heavyweight title fight, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013, in San Antonio. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    Tamas Kovacs, right, takes a swing at Beibut Shumenov, left, during their WBA Super World and IBA light heavyweight title fight, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013, in San Antonio. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

  • Tamas Kovacs, right, takes a swing at Beibut Shumenov, left, during their WBA Super World and IBA light heavyweight title fight, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013, in San Antonio. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    Tamas Kovacs, right, takes a swing at Beibut Shumenov, left, during their WBA Super World and IBA light heavyweight title fight, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013, in San Antonio. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

  • Venessa Salazar, right, helps her mother, Lisa Salazar, use a computer at a public library to navigate the Affordable Health Care Act website, Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2013, in San Antonio. Thousands of Texans enrolled for health insurance in October and November on the embattled federal online exchange, nearly five times more than successfully navigated the site during its rocky opening month, but still a tiny tally for such a large state, according to figures released Wednesday. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    Venessa Salazar, right, helps her mother, Lisa Salazar, use a computer at a public library to navigate the Affordable Health Care Act website, Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2013, in San Antonio. Thousands of Texans enrolled for health insurance in October and November on the embattled federal online exchange, nearly five times more than successfully navigated the site during its rocky opening month, but still a tiny tally for such a large state, according to figures released Wednesday. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

  • FILE - In this Dec. 4, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks about the new health care law during a White House Youth Summit, in the South Court Auditorium in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington. Americans who already have health insurance are blaming President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul for their rising premiums and deductibles, and overall 3 in 4 say the rollout of coverage for the uninsured has gone poorly.  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
  • FILE - In this Dec. 4, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks about the new health care law during a White House Youth Summit, in the South Court Auditorium in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington. Americans who already have health insurance are blaming President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul for their rising premiums and deductibles, and overall 3 in 4 say the rollout of coverage for the uninsured has gone poorly.  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
  • This frame grab APTN shows an overhead shot of former South African president Nelson Mandela's casket during his funeral service Sunday, Dec. 15, 2013, in Quny, South Africa. (AP Photo/APTN)
  • This frame grab APTN shows an overhead shot of former South African president Nelson Mandela's casket during his funeral service Sunday, Dec. 15, 2013, in Quny, South Africa. (AP Photo/APTN)
  • CORRECTS SOURCE TO SABC -This frame grab from SABC  shows an overhead shot of former South African president Nelson Mandela's casket during his funeral service Sunday, Dec. 15, 2013, in Qunu, South Africa. (AP Photo/SABC, Pool)
  • CORRECTS SOURCE TO SABC -This frame grab from SABC  shows an overhead shot of former South African president Nelson Mandela's casket during his funeral service Sunday, Dec. 15, 2013, in Qunu, South Africa. (AP Photo/SABC, Pool)
  • FILE - This photo of part of the HealthCare.gov website is photographed in Washington, in this Nov. 29, 2013 file photo. Newly released federal figures, as of Nov. 30, 2013, show more people are picking private insurance plans or being routed to Medicaid programs in states with Democratic leaders who have fully embraced the federal health care law than in states where Republican elected officials have derisively rejected what they call "Obamacare." (AP Photo/Jon Elswick, File)
  • Tamas Kovacs, right, takes a swing at Beibut Shumenov, left, during their WBA Super World and IBA light heavyweight title fight, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013, in San Antonio. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
  • Tamas Kovacs, right, takes a swing at Beibut Shumenov, left, during their WBA Super World and IBA light heavyweight title fight, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013, in San Antonio. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
  • Venessa Salazar, right, helps her mother, Lisa Salazar, use a computer at a public library to navigate the Affordable Health Care Act website, Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2013, in San Antonio. Thousands of Texans enrolled for health insurance in October and November on the embattled federal online exchange, nearly five times more than successfully navigated the site during its rocky opening month, but still a tiny tally for such a large state, according to figures released Wednesday. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Americans who already have health insurance are blaming President Obama’s health care overhaul for their rising premiums and deductibles, and overall 3 in 4 say the rollout of coverage for the uninsured has gone poorly.

An Associated Press-GfK poll finds that health care remains politically charged going into next year’s congressional elections. Keeping the refurbished HealthCare.gov website running smoothly is just one of Obama’s challenges, maybe not the biggest.

The poll found a striking level of unease about the law among people who have health insurance and aren’t looking for any more government help. Those are the 85 percent of Americans who the White House says don’t have to be worried about the president’s historic push to expand coverage for the uninsured.

In the survey, nearly half of those with job-based or other private coverage say their policies will be changing next year – mostly for the worse. Nearly 4 in 5 (77 percent) blame the changes on the Affordable Care Act, even though the trend toward leaner coverage predates the law’s passage.

Sixty-nine percent say their premiums will be going up, while 59 percent say annual deductibles or copayments are increasing.

Only 21 percent of those with private coverage said their plan is expanding to cover more types of medical care, though coverage of preventive care at no charge to the patient has been required by the law for the past couple of years.

Fourteen percent said coverage for spouses is being restricted or eliminated, and 11 percent said their plan is being discontinued.

“Rightly or wrongly, people with private insurance looking at next year are really worried about what is going to happen,” said Robert Blendon, a professor at the Harvard School of Public Health, who tracks public opinion on health care issues. “The website is not the whole story.”

Employers trying to control their health insurance bills have been shifting costs to workers for years, but now those changes are blamed increasingly on Obamacare instead of the economy or insurance companies.

Political leanings seemed to affect perceptions of eroding coverage, with larger majorities of Republicans and independents saying their coverage will be affected.

Legacy Comments18

Subsidy=someone else paying for your health care and seeing an increase on their health care bill.

The subsidies are funded by taxes, not by health insurance premiums. The subsidies do not come from the health insurance companies.

The subsidies will be absorbed by others who will pay more because the grandfathering clause will raise others premiums to make ends meet. That is how the law is designed so yes, we are all subsidizing those subsidized through higher premiums and deductibles.

I wonder how many people looking at the cost of insurance on the ACA website and complaining about the cost are acttually curently covered by their employer who pays a good part of that cost and don't take that into account. I pay 1/3 and my employer pays 2/3.

Well, my company pays 75%, I pay 25% but next year the really good plan I have may not meet the Obamacare narrow grandfathering clause. So, looking at the actual cost to move to an exchange, my premiums will be a little less than twice as much, my deductible will go from $600 to $12,000 and my drug plan co-pays will double. I hope that the same happens to you. We will see then if you are as enthusiastic about Obamacare. Company compensation is a "benefit" for employees to attract the best people. If Obamacare wipes that out, the average family of 4 will pay $7500 more so that others can be "subsidized".

If companies want to attract the best people they will continue to provide health care. If they don't, those great employees will go sdomewhere else that does.

From the article: "Employers trying to control their health insurance bills have been shifting costs to workers for years, but now those changes are blamed increasingly on Obamacare instead of the economy or insurance companies. " I say, bring on the single-payer health care. Then it should be absolutely clear where any increases in consumer/taxpayer cost are coming from. There should be only one factor in the cost of "insurance," and that is the cost of health care. We need to get profit-motivated insurance companies out of the middle. Increase payroll taxes a bit and provide everyone with both preventative and reactive health care. Have rules that say that anyone who show up at the ER with less than emergency problems gets re-directed to their PCP. Allow the government to negotiate drug prices (what were they thinking when they passed THAT law?). This might be considered socialism, but so is public education, public safety and public works. It's the price we ought to be paying for living in a cilivized society.

It sure changed our insurance. The price would have doubled, the deductible would increase, and the coverage wouldn't have included parts we use. Why "would have?" Because it "would have" been un-affordable, so we don't have health insurance now.

Have you shopped the exchange? Do you qualify for a subsidy?

Do you qualify for a subsidy? - in the old great America even liberals would have been embarrassed to state that freeloading philosophy - not the new progressive liberal democrats -

No, they are "entitled"

No, I do not qualify. I am fortunate to get affordable coverage from my employer, but even if it were not affordable, my income is too high to qualify for the subsidy on the exchange.

Gee, golly, no, I will be subidizing other people.

Itsa - how many times does this have to be said. You are ALREADY subisizing people who don't have insurance, through higher premiums on your own insurance. You've been doing that for decades. Yes, I am a liberal/progressive, but unlike your under-informed stereotype, I am not looking for a handout. Most of the other libs I know personally are not looking for a hand out. I'd really appreciate it if you would not paint all of us with the same predudicial brush. I know that I subisidize others currently. I know that I will subidize others in the future, either under the current ACA or under Obamacare. I know this, and I still think it's the right thing to do. As I've said in other places, universal health care is a price we should be paying (all of us, me included) for living in a civilized society.

I meant "either under the current ACA or under single-payer."

FOF, how many times do I have to tell you that under Obamacare, everyones insurance is going up. I kind of like the cost of subsidizing now. The average family will realize a $7500 increase in premiums next year.... that is truly shameful and yes they will be subsidizing a minority who will pay LESS! You confuse fairness with ideology.

Nice to decide what price "we" should be paying. If you want to subsidize someone else then you can pay $7500 more per year so that someone you don't even know can pay nothing to get the same coverage you are paying so handsomely for. And in fact you will probably be waiting in line behind them.

One would have to be a low information democrat voter to NOT know that NObamaKare is a 100% democrat created disaster. The roll out debacle is not the disaster - it is just a symptom - the disaster is that the math of NObamaKare proves that this "TRINITY of Lies" is unsustainable and is nothing more than the democrats slight of hand redistribution of our money from the makers to the takers

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