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Concord man accused in fentanyl death has been charged with 41 crimes over 15 years

  • Morgen Chapman, 31, is led into Merrimack County Superior Court on Wednesday, May 17, 2017, for his arraignment after being indicted by a grand jury in the April 2016 death of a Pembroke woman. GEOFF FORESTER / Monitor staff

  • Morgen Chapman, 31, is led into Merrimack County Superior Court on Wednesday, May 17, 2017, for his arraignment after being indicted by a grand jury in the April 2016 death of a Pembroke woman. GEOFF FORESTER / Monitor staff



Monitor staff
Wednesday, May 17, 2017

The Concord man accused of giving a fatal dose of fentanyl to a 21-year-old Pembroke woman last year has been charged with dozens of other crimes over the past 15 years, according to court documents.

Morgen Chapman appeared for his arraignment on the drug charge Wednesday in Merrimack County Superior Court, where prosecutors from the attorney general’s office sought to hold the 31-year-old Abbotville Road man without bail.

Since Chapman had no attorney present, Judge Richard McNamara temporarily ordered him held without bail at the state prison until he’s assigned a public defender and another hearing can be scheduled.

“You have a right to a hearing,” McNamara told Chapman, noting that the state must prove he should be held without bail. “That hearing isn’t going to do you much good without an attorney.”

A statement issued Tuesday by Attorney General Gordon MacDonald and Pembroke police Chief Dwayne Gilman said the felony charge against Chapman “carries a possible maximum sentence of life in state prison with the possibility of parole.”

Assistant Attorney General Jesse O’Neill said after the hearing that he couldn’t discuss prior charges against Chapman.

But court records show that Chapman has been charged with 41 crimes since 2002, ranging from tobacco possession as a minor to the most recent charge, which alleges that Chapman’s distribution of fentanyl to 21-year-old Violetta Monastyrskaya of Pembroke resulted in her death.

Nearly 500 people in New Hampshire died from overdoses last year, with the potent synthetic opioid fentanyl as the primary culprit.

According to court system records, the first charges against Chapman came in November 2002, when he was 17 years old. He was charged with the violation-level offense of possessing tobacco as a minor and a misdemeanor for carrying a weapon.

Four months later, he was charged with two separate offenses 23 days apart in March 2003 for theft, at least one of which was a felony-level charge, records show. Before the close of that year, he would add two charges of criminal trespassing, three of burglary, four of receiving stolen property, one of driving while intoxicated, one of conduct after an accident and two related to alcohol possession.

Between 2005 and 2010, he faced multiple counts in each category of driving while intoxicated, witness tampering, criminal threatening, felon in possession of a deadly weapon and drug charges.

On Wednesday, without a lawyer present, Chapman spoke briefly with the judge. McNamara warned Chapman: “Until you have a lawyer, I don’t want you to say too much.”

Standing in a juniper-colored jumpsuit, with his hands cuffed in front of him, Chapman signaled that he’d read the prosecution’s motion to hold him without bail and understood the situation.

“I feel comfortable with what they have to say,” he told the judge. “I’m aware of my rights, your honor.”

(Nick Reid can be reached at 369-3325, nreid@cmonitor.com or on Twitter at
@NickBReid.)