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Local police reflect on Officer, Steve Arkell Brentwood shooting

  • Law enforcement officers from New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Maine and beyond process to the memorial service for Brentwood police officer Stephen Arkell at Exeter High School on Wednesday, May 21, 2014.  <br/>(ARIANA van den AKKER / Monitor staff)

    Law enforcement officers from New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Maine and beyond process to the memorial service for Brentwood police officer Stephen Arkell at Exeter High School on Wednesday, May 21, 2014.
    (ARIANA van den AKKER / Monitor staff)

  • Jack Blyth, 5, of Brentwood and Jessica Jillson, 7, of Newton wave flags as they wait for the police procession before the memorial service for Brentwood police officer Stephen Arkell at Exeter High School on Wednesday, May 21, 2014.   <br/><br/>(ARIANA van den AKKER / Monitor staff)

    Jack Blyth, 5, of Brentwood and Jessica Jillson, 7, of Newton wave flags as they wait for the police procession before the memorial service for Brentwood police officer Stephen Arkell at Exeter High School on Wednesday, May 21, 2014.

    (ARIANA van den AKKER / Monitor staff)

  • Law enforcement officers from New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Maine and beyond process to the memorial service for Brentwood police officer Stephen Arkell at Exeter High School on Wednesday, May 21, 2014.  <br/>(ARIANA van den AKKER / Monitor staff)
  • Jack Blyth, 5, of Brentwood and Jessica Jillson, 7, of Newton wave flags as they wait for the police procession before the memorial service for Brentwood police officer Stephen Arkell at Exeter High School on Wednesday, May 21, 2014.   <br/><br/>(ARIANA van den AKKER / Monitor staff)

Beneath the beating morning sun, more than 2,000 law enforcement officials representing departments across New England united in step, badge and purpose for a 2-mile-long procession leading slain Brentwood police Officer Steve Arkell’s casket to a memorial service in Exeter yesterday.

“We have had such a huge show of support, it’s been absolutely incredible,” said Brentwood police Sgt. Denny Wood at the staging area in Epping, before the procession began. “It’s unfortunate that this situation is what brought us all so close.”

Arkell, a part-time officer, was fatally shot while responding to a domestic dispute in Brentwood last week. The tragedy shook the small, 4,000-person community that supports a police force of five full-time officers and five part-timers.

Yesterday’s memorial at the Exeter High School football field drew dozens of law enforcement officials from the Concord area, who came to march and ride in the procession to pay their respects.

“Officer Arkell made the ultimate sacrifice serving his community,” said Dunbarton police Sgt. Chris Remillard. He marched in the procession alongside officers from dozens of New Hampshire towns spanning from Berlin to Portsmouth.

Because New Hampshire is relatively small, Remillard said, this type of tragedy rocks the state’s tightly knit law enforcement community.

“It reminds us that it can happen anywhere, that every call you need to handle with the utmost care,” he said. “A day like today reminds us that law enforcement is a dangerous profession.”

That message rang true for Hopkinton police Cpl. Thomas Hennessey, who rode a motorcycle in the procession. Like Brentwood, Hopkinton is a small community, he said.

“It makes you more cautious knowing this can happen anywhere,” Hennessey said. “As much can happen in a small town as a big city.”

Knowing that, it means no officer can be complacent, said Concord interim police Chief Brad Osgood. More than 40 Concord police officers marched in the procession to pay their respects.

“It happens every day that we get calls like that, every day,” Osgood said. “It makes officers pause.”

Goffstown police Chief Robert Browne echoed that sentiment. “No matter what call you go to, it could be the call you end up risking your life on,” he said. “No call is routine.”

Fifteen officers from Goffstown attended the memorial procession and service. The large showing of support by officers that came from as far away as New York, Maine and Massachusetts is what makes law enforcement proud to wear the badge, Browne said.

(Allie Morris can be reached at 369-3307 or at amorris@cmonitor.com.)

Related

N.H. says goodbye to Brentwood police Officer Steve Arkell

Thursday, May 22, 2014

Steve Arkell was a family man who was deeply committed to his community and his job, several speakers told thousands of mourners from across the region who gathered in Exeter yesterday to remember the Brentwood police officer. “Steve died doing what he loved and did best: helping the people of Brentwood,” said the town’s police chief, Wayne Robinson, at the … 0

You are so right, the Officers shot and disabled because of their injuries are truly forgotten. There is no large payoff from the Feds, no checks from the State Treasurer and no huge fund raisers. They are forced to retire on a disability pension, that after paying for their family health benefits are left with little money. I know this because my Uncle is one of these Officers. His pension is $3100 a Month and after he pays $1500 a month towards his health benefits there is little left as his payment for risking his life to keep us safe. My heart goes out to the family of those brave men and women who are killed in the line of duty, and I will always remember the officers who are shot and become one of the forgotten heroes.

NHRobin, I remember that call involving the Hopkinton Officer. He was shot and pinned down, almost 600 rounds were fired and a State Trooper was also wounded. In an affluent community a Policeman can be shot with a high powered rifle and then pinned down almost bleeding to death until SWAT rescued him screams loud and clear that Officers can be exposed to extreme risk anywhere at any time. We only hear of the Officers killed but to the few shot and disabled I will never forget and hope they too get some recognition.

Reference what "Dunbarton police Sgt. Chris Remillard" said, of: "this type of tragedy rocks the state’s tightly knit law enforcement community. " of that "tightly knit"ing of an integrated [ http://www.synonyms.net/synonym/tight-knit ] force of support for one another http://www.macmillandictionary.com/thesaurus/british/tight-knit into that larger group of what? fellow officers at the local-level state-wide on the same level, and probably the others too, as in the over-lap of the State Police, right? http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/integrate but when I see State Troopers in the Executive Branch take their "marching orders" from The Attorney "General" as in the quasi Executive AND Judicial branch as Bar licensed it is disgusting! and especially so of when a Trooper presents an RSA Ch. 643:1 Official Oppression to the A.G.'s "Public Integrity Unit" for where they investigate but do NEVER render a Report against one of their buddies, of a fellow public servants, that is WRONG of to agree to this continual cover-up! They be not law en-FORCE-ers, but policy participants in the over-ride of the law, of really out-laws!

So tragic but so true about small Towns. An Officer from a small Town faces similar risks as Officers from large communities with the exception that cops from small Towns usually do it without back up. Cpl. Henessey from Hopkinton knows all too well, about 20 years ago a Hopkinton Officer was shot and seriously injured at a police call making it all so real for officers throughout the area. I salute the Officers of this State for their bravery and hope they never forget that calls like this can happen at any moment.

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