Cloudy
34°
Cloudy
Hi 44° | Lo 33°

Concord Police attempt to corral moose away from residences

On Tuesday morning local and state police tried in vain to corral the moose first reported in South Concord on Saturday morning. For more than two hours multiple agencies chased the animal through property on the north side of Clinton street, sometimes stopping traffic according to witnesses. The operation ended after the moose headed into the corn field behind Memorial Field.

BRIAN BLACKDEN for the Monitor

On Tuesday morning local and state police tried in vain to corral the moose first reported in South Concord on Saturday morning. For more than two hours multiple agencies chased the animal through property on the north side of Clinton street, sometimes stopping traffic according to witnesses. The operation ended after the moose headed into the corn field behind Memorial Field. BRIAN BLACKDEN for the Monitor

The Concord police teamed up with other agencies yesterday morning to attempt to herd a moose roaming the South End of Concord back to its wooded habitat.

Concord police Chief John Duval said the department was contacted by the police from the New Hampshire Hospital and asked to assist in corralling the animal away from the area. The New Hampshire Fish and Game Department and the state police also assisted.

“It happens several times a year where either a moose or some other wildlife enters the city,” Duval said. “Our main focus is to make sure one, the animal doesn’t get hurt, and our citizens don’t get hurt or the motoring public. And two, to mitigate and direct the animal back to his natural habitat.”

Brian Blackden, a freelance photographer and owner of Pepper Defense Supply Store in Concord, witnessed the incident. Blackden said the departments attempted to herd the moose into the wooded area behind Memorial Field by car, on foot and using a dragnet. The moose was eventually cornered in a yard next to the Salvation Army on Clinton Street but then ventured into a field at the corner of Clinton and Langley Parkway, he said.

Duval said he had no way of knowing whether the moose was one of the two found wandering the South End on Saturday. While it is not commonplace for moose to be found in a residential area, he said it does happen sometimes.

“The South End neighborhood has a lot of areas with trees and woods, and those areas attract wildlife,” he said. “We’ve had sightings of bobcats on occasion. It’s not particularly unusual.”

Whenever a wildlife sighting does occur, Duval said officials work to herd the animal away from the human population for the safety of both residents and the animal.

“It’s not their natural habitat and when any wildlife comes into a more urban setting with asphalt, roads and homes, I’d imagine they lose their bearings,” he said. “So our goal is to kind of push them to an area where their habitat becomes available, where there are woods and trees, and directly away from populated areas where there are motor vehicles and accidents could occur.”

(Mel Flanagan can be reached at 369-3321 or mflanagan@cmonitor.com.)

Legacy Comments0
There are no comments yet. Be the first!
Post a Comment

You must be registered to comment on stories. Click here to register.