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New York / New Jersey

Sandy survivors sorrowful, thankful

Region’s residents mark 1-year anniversary of unprecedented storm

  • Before signing herself, a woman looks at a large board with supportive messages for victims of Superstorm Sandy in the Midland Beach section of Staten Island, New York, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Candles and flashlights will light up the shore along the East Coast as survivors of Superstorm Sandy's devastation pay their respects to what was lost when the storm roared ashore one year ago. In Staten Island, where Sandy roared ashore and killed 23 people, there are still plenty of reminders of the storm. Wallboard and debris are piled on front lawns. Bungalows are covered in plywood. "Restricted Use" signs are plastered on many front doors. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    Before signing herself, a woman looks at a large board with supportive messages for victims of Superstorm Sandy in the Midland Beach section of Staten Island, New York, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Candles and flashlights will light up the shore along the East Coast as survivors of Superstorm Sandy's devastation pay their respects to what was lost when the storm roared ashore one year ago. In Staten Island, where Sandy roared ashore and killed 23 people, there are still plenty of reminders of the storm. Wallboard and debris are piled on front lawns. Bungalows are covered in plywood. "Restricted Use" signs are plastered on many front doors. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

  • Volunteers plant beach grass on a newly constructed sand dune along the beach in the Breezy Point neighborhood in the Queens borough of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. A year ago Superstorm Sandy ravaged the region. The beach grass will protect the new dune, 1200 feet in length, from erosion. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

    Volunteers plant beach grass on a newly constructed sand dune along the beach in the Breezy Point neighborhood in the Queens borough of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. A year ago Superstorm Sandy ravaged the region. The beach grass will protect the new dune, 1200 feet in length, from erosion. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Volunteers plant beach grass on a newly constructed sand dune along the beach in the Breezy Point neighborhood in the Queens borough of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. A year ago, Superstorm Sandy ravaged the region. The beach grass will protect the dune, 1200 feet in length, from erosion. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

    Volunteers plant beach grass on a newly constructed sand dune along the beach in the Breezy Point neighborhood in the Queens borough of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. A year ago, Superstorm Sandy ravaged the region. The beach grass will protect the dune, 1200 feet in length, from erosion. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • In early morning darkness, workers prepare heavy machinery for the day as rebuilding work continues on the beach area of Seaside Heights and Seaside Park, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. A large Sandy-related fire on the boardwalk in September has slowed progress in the area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

    In early morning darkness, workers prepare heavy machinery for the day as rebuilding work continues on the beach area of Seaside Heights and Seaside Park, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. A large Sandy-related fire on the boardwalk in September has slowed progress in the area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

  • In early morning darkness, workers prepare heavy machinery for the day as rebuilding work continues on the beach area of Seaside Heights and Seaside Park, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. A large Sandy-related fire on the boardwalk in September has slowed progress in the area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

    In early morning darkness, workers prepare heavy machinery for the day as rebuilding work continues on the beach area of Seaside Heights and Seaside Park, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. A large Sandy-related fire on the boardwalk in September has slowed progress in the area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

  • As the sunrises, Sue Dougherty looks for shells along the beach In Seaside Heights, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

    As the sunrises, Sue Dougherty looks for shells along the beach In Seaside Heights, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

  • As the sunrises, a person looks out over the ocean in Seaside Heights, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

    As the sunrises, a person looks out over the ocean in Seaside Heights, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

  • In early morning darkness, a worker prepares heavy machinery for the day as rebuilding work continues on the beach area of Seaside Heights and Seaside Park, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. A large Sandy-related fire on the boardwalk in September has slowed progress in the area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

    In early morning darkness, a worker prepares heavy machinery for the day as rebuilding work continues on the beach area of Seaside Heights and Seaside Park, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. A large Sandy-related fire on the boardwalk in September has slowed progress in the area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

  • Residents attend a candlelight vigil at the West Hamilton Beach Volunteer Fire Department to commemorate the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy, Monday, Oct. 28, 2013, in the Queens borough of New York. U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan announced a second round of federal Sandy recovery aid of nearly $2.1 billion for New York state and over $1.3 billion in Community Development Block Grants for New York City. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

    Residents attend a candlelight vigil at the West Hamilton Beach Volunteer Fire Department to commemorate the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy, Monday, Oct. 28, 2013, in the Queens borough of New York. U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan announced a second round of federal Sandy recovery aid of nearly $2.1 billion for New York state and over $1.3 billion in Community Development Block Grants for New York City. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

  • Residents attend a candlelight vigil at the West Hamilton Beach Volunteer Fire Department to commemorate the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy, Monday, Oct. 28, 2013, in the Queens borough of New York. U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan announced a second round of federal Sandy recovery aid of nearly $2.1 billion for New York state and over $1.3 billion in Community Development Block Grants for New York City. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

    Residents attend a candlelight vigil at the West Hamilton Beach Volunteer Fire Department to commemorate the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy, Monday, Oct. 28, 2013, in the Queens borough of New York. U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan announced a second round of federal Sandy recovery aid of nearly $2.1 billion for New York state and over $1.3 billion in Community Development Block Grants for New York City. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

  • Helen Chan holds her daughter, Ila Paz, as they join babies celebrating their first birthdays - and  survival - at New York University’s Langone Medical Center Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013, a year after the hospital evacuated more 40 babies to safety on sleds at the height of Superstorm Sandy in New York. On the first anniversary of Sandy, the babies’ parents and hospital staff lighted candles atop cupcakes and sang, "Happy birthday, dear babies." While Ila feasted on frosting, and gleefully smeared it all over her face, her mother said, “This is the best meal of her life!”  (AP Photo/Verena Dobnik)

    Helen Chan holds her daughter, Ila Paz, as they join babies celebrating their first birthdays - and survival - at New York University’s Langone Medical Center Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013, a year after the hospital evacuated more 40 babies to safety on sleds at the height of Superstorm Sandy in New York. On the first anniversary of Sandy, the babies’ parents and hospital staff lighted candles atop cupcakes and sang, "Happy birthday, dear babies." While Ila feasted on frosting, and gleefully smeared it all over her face, her mother said, “This is the best meal of her life!” (AP Photo/Verena Dobnik)

  • New Jersey governor Chris Christie hugs a woman at a statewide prayer service held at The New Hope Baptist Church in Newark, N.J., on Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013, the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. Christie made a number of stops throughout the state commemorating the first anniversary of the powerful storm that tore through the state, leaving more than 340,000 homes either damaged or destroyed and 71 deaths in its wake.  (AP Photo/Eric Thayer, Pool)

    New Jersey governor Chris Christie hugs a woman at a statewide prayer service held at The New Hope Baptist Church in Newark, N.J., on Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013, the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. Christie made a number of stops throughout the state commemorating the first anniversary of the powerful storm that tore through the state, leaving more than 340,000 homes either damaged or destroyed and 71 deaths in its wake. (AP Photo/Eric Thayer, Pool)

  • Before signing herself, a woman looks at a large board with supportive messages for victims of Superstorm Sandy in the Midland Beach section of Staten Island, New York, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Candles and flashlights will light up the shore along the East Coast as survivors of Superstorm Sandy's devastation pay their respects to what was lost when the storm roared ashore one year ago. In Staten Island, where Sandy roared ashore and killed 23 people, there are still plenty of reminders of the storm. Wallboard and debris are piled on front lawns. Bungalows are covered in plywood. "Restricted Use" signs are plastered on many front doors. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
  • Volunteers plant beach grass on a newly constructed sand dune along the beach in the Breezy Point neighborhood in the Queens borough of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. A year ago Superstorm Sandy ravaged the region. The beach grass will protect the new dune, 1200 feet in length, from erosion. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
  • Volunteers plant beach grass on a newly constructed sand dune along the beach in the Breezy Point neighborhood in the Queens borough of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. A year ago, Superstorm Sandy ravaged the region. The beach grass will protect the dune, 1200 feet in length, from erosion. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
  • In early morning darkness, workers prepare heavy machinery for the day as rebuilding work continues on the beach area of Seaside Heights and Seaside Park, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. A large Sandy-related fire on the boardwalk in September has slowed progress in the area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
  • In early morning darkness, workers prepare heavy machinery for the day as rebuilding work continues on the beach area of Seaside Heights and Seaside Park, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. A large Sandy-related fire on the boardwalk in September has slowed progress in the area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
  • As the sunrises, Sue Dougherty looks for shells along the beach In Seaside Heights, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
  • As the sunrises, a person looks out over the ocean in Seaside Heights, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
  • In early morning darkness, a worker prepares heavy machinery for the day as rebuilding work continues on the beach area of Seaside Heights and Seaside Park, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. A large Sandy-related fire on the boardwalk in September has slowed progress in the area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
  • Residents attend a candlelight vigil at the West Hamilton Beach Volunteer Fire Department to commemorate the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy, Monday, Oct. 28, 2013, in the Queens borough of New York. U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan announced a second round of federal Sandy recovery aid of nearly $2.1 billion for New York state and over $1.3 billion in Community Development Block Grants for New York City. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
  • Residents attend a candlelight vigil at the West Hamilton Beach Volunteer Fire Department to commemorate the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy, Monday, Oct. 28, 2013, in the Queens borough of New York. U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan announced a second round of federal Sandy recovery aid of nearly $2.1 billion for New York state and over $1.3 billion in Community Development Block Grants for New York City. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
  • Helen Chan holds her daughter, Ila Paz, as they join babies celebrating their first birthdays - and  survival - at New York University’s Langone Medical Center Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013, a year after the hospital evacuated more 40 babies to safety on sleds at the height of Superstorm Sandy in New York. On the first anniversary of Sandy, the babies’ parents and hospital staff lighted candles atop cupcakes and sang, "Happy birthday, dear babies." While Ila feasted on frosting, and gleefully smeared it all over her face, her mother said, “This is the best meal of her life!”  (AP Photo/Verena Dobnik)
  • New Jersey governor Chris Christie hugs a woman at a statewide prayer service held at The New Hope Baptist Church in Newark, N.J., on Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013, the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. Christie made a number of stops throughout the state commemorating the first anniversary of the powerful storm that tore through the state, leaving more than 340,000 homes either damaged or destroyed and 71 deaths in its wake.  (AP Photo/Eric Thayer, Pool)

A year after superstorm Sandy deluged coastal communities with seawater, many people still can’t believe they’re not back in their homes. Others are thankful for small victories in the long, arduous recovery process.

Devastated residents yesterday recalled the help they got from strangers in the days and months after Sandy. Some have mostly recovered from the storm, while others are still homeless or living without heat.

Sandy came ashore Oct. 29, 2012, sending floodwaters pouring across the densely populated barrier islands of Long Island and the Jersey Shore. In New York City, the storm surge hit nearly 14 feet, swamping the city’s subway and commuter rail tunnels and knocking out power to the southern third of Manhattan.

The storm was blamed for at least 182 deaths in the United States – including 68 in New York and 71 in New Jersey – and property damage was estimated at $65 billion.

Here is a look at how people are commemorating the unprecedented storm:

‘It’s behind me’

One year after Sandy, what Ellen Bednarz of Sayreville, N.J., remembered most was the kindness of the debris haulers who carted away the family’s ruined possessions.

“I never saw more caring people,” she said at an event to thank firefighters who used boats to rescue scores of people.

Before the storm hit, Bednarz and her family hastily moved their patio set, family room and office furniture to a storage unit and checked into a hotel. Only when they were allowed back to their split-level days later did they see the water had risen 14 feet – destroying everything, even the items the family had moved upstairs.

Bednarz is renting an apartment and waiting to close on a government home buyout.

“It’s over,” she said. “It’s probably one of the worst years of my life, but it’s behind me.”

‘Happy birthday’

When Sandy darkened much of the city, some New Yorkers were only hours old. Others weren’t even born.

Yesterday, babies filled a Manhattan hospital room to celebrate their first birthdays – and their survival.

Kenneth Hulett III weighed only 2 pounds when emergency medical workers rushed him out of the New York Hospital intensive care unit and down the stairs while hooked up to an oxygen tank. His mother, Emily Blatt, said her faith sustained her as she was evacuated on an orange sled.

That day, more than 40 babies were safely moved from the hospital to other facilities.

Yesterday, their parents and hospital staff lighted candles atop cupcakes and sang, “Happy birthday, dear babies.”

‘Feeling of powerlessness’

Visiting a flood-damaged firehouse in Seaside Park, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said yesterday was a day to remember volunteers and first responders who risked their lives to save others. Christie, who stayed overnight at the governor’s beach house in neighboring Island Beach State Park, said he woke up and was struck by “just how much different we all feel a year later.”

“I want us to think of how much better things look today than they did a year ago and celebrate that,” Christie said. “We also have to acknowledge that there’s still thousands of people out of their homes.”

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo visited the National Museum of the American Indian in lower Manhattan, which was temporarily shut down last year by flooding and power outages.

Cuomo recalled the “feeling of powerlessness” seeing the southern tip of Manhattan submerged in water. He also warned that extreme weather is “the new normal” but said the city and state is now better equipped to withstand it.

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg visited Staten Island, Coney Island and the Rockaways, where he thanked and chatted with workers.

“Most New Yorkers are, I suspect, are struggling with somber memories today, which is only natural,” Bloomberg said. “A year ago we endured the worst natural disaster ever to strike our city.”

‘Now we’re poor’

Aiman Youssef found out the other day that one of his neighbors has been living in his own Staten Island garage.

He says many people in his shorefront neighborhood are still displaced or living in partially restored homes, often without basic facilities.

“A lot of people have moved out of the area,” Youssef said. “A lot of houses went into foreclosure.”

Some homeowners are still reluctant to accept help, Youssef said, while others have been stymied by bureaucracy. He pointed to a bungalow across the street from his tent on Midland Avenue.

A woman is living there without heat despite a city program that was supposed to restore heat, electric and water service, he said.

“We were lower middle class,” Youssef said. “Now we’re poor.”

The regulars are back

The lobby of the Wall Street Inn, a boutique hotel located in a 19th-century building in lower Manhattan, was lonely and empty. But manager Rachel Fogel said business is steady again despite initial fears that the hotel started by her grandfather might never come back.

The hotel was evacuated as the storm hit. The scene on South William Street the next day was discouraging, she said.

“It was dark. It was cold. It smelled like gasoline,” Fogel said.

Weeks of work was needed on basement electrical and heating systems before the hotel reopened in December. Contractors were the first post-storm guests.

Now the regulars are back. One was a man who came back months later to retrieve dry cleaning he sent on the eve of Sandy.

Legacy Comments19

I know as Americans we don't pay too much attention to the rest of the world, but even as the mainland US has had a comparatively quiet weather year the rest of the planet hasn't. The effect of climate change is world wide from eroding coast lines to melting glaciers. We are all one world and you all can live with your heads in the sand but it doesn't mean you won't be affected too.

"but even as the mainland US has had a comparatively quiet weather year the rest of the planet hasn't."....not that I dont believe every word you say..but surely you have some sort of supporting data to back up your claim...

she does not as it is a fib to put it politely - shame an elderly women has to do that

what is unprecedented is how wrong the "experts" were predicting this years hurricane season. What is unprecedented is the number of hurricanes Obama has had to deal with hitting the US...but you wont hear that in the news...but sure as I'm sitting here...if next Oct 9th, NYC gets 30 inches of snow because of a hurricane..that will be unprecedented.

the company hired in a NO bid contract to administer the $2 BILLION Sandy Recovery Funds has failed miserably in its job....what is amazing is that it is the same company that Obama gave the NO bid ObamaKare website debacle. More interesting is that Michelle Obama's classmate runs that company and spent Christmas at the White House and Valerie Jarret's daughter and son in law also are senior executives there....most likely liberals reading this will say - who is Valerie Jarrett

'Region’s residents mark 1-year anniversary of unprecedented storm"....really??? unprecedented??????......http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_New_York_hurricanes...I especially like the Oct 9 1804 storm.."Heavy snow falls in Eastern New York peaking at 30 inches (75 cm) as a hurricane tracks northward along the East Coast and becomes extratropical, as cold air fed into the system"....Can you imagine the screams of "global warming" if 30 inches of snow fell on NYC in 2012???

What a wonderful memory you have GWTW, or did you have to get on your trusty computer and just have to look this up? Get a life and hope you never lose your home to a storm.

did you have a point other than insulting me? The fact is, hurricanes hit NYC fairly frequently. Thats not unprecedented. 30 inches of snow on Oct 9th is not unprecedented. Whats unprecedented is the amount of ignorance of history there is on the left.....

What my point is, that you can read this story about the suffering of the people of NY and their recovery and all you can get out of it is a word that upsets you because you think it denotes bias toward climate change. Is that how you read everything? Missing the story but looking for some certain word that you can goggle and prove wrong? I do mean it. Go out and do something useful. .

To Tillie below...You may have forgotten I was born and raised in NYC...family and friends still live there..I can assure you I do in fact know about the suffering of the people of NYC. I also know there are billions of dollars in donated and federal funds that are just sitting there while people continue to suffer. But by all means, continue your personal insults. I'm sure it makes you feel better.

Not only does the poster above disregard the science, but also the best judgment of the insurance industry. But then, facts have never stopped any of the Carp Per Diem brigade. "The view that weather extremes are becoming more frequent and intense in various regions due to global warming is in keeping with current scientific findings, as set out in the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) as well as in the special report on weather extremes and disasters (SREX). Up to now, however, the increasing losses caused by weather related natural catastrophes have been primarily driven by socio-economic factors, such as population growth, urban sprawl and increasing wealth. Among many other risk insights the study now provides new evidence for the emerging impact of climate change. For thunderstorm-related losses the analysis reveals increasing volatility and a significant long-term upward trend in the normalized figures over the last 40 years. These figures have been adjusted to account for factors such as increasing values, population growth and inflation. A detailed analysis of the time series indicates that the observed changes closely match the pattern of change in meteorological conditions necessary for the formation of large thunderstorm cells. Thus it is quite probable that changing climate conditions are the drivers. The climatic changes detected are in line with the modelled changes due to human-made climate change. The Head of Munich Re’s Geo Risks Research unit, Prof. Peter Höppe, commented: 'In all likelihood, we have to regard this finding as an initial climate-change footprint in our US loss data from the last four decades. Previously, there had not been such a strong chain of evidence. If the first effects of climate change are already perceptible, all alerts and measures against it have become even more pressing.' Höppe continued that even without changing hazard conditions, increases in population, built-up areas and increasing values, particularly in hazard-prone regions, need to be on Munich Re’s risk radar. All stakeholders should collaborate and close ranks to support improved adaptation. In addition, climate change mitigation measures should be supported to limit global warming in the long term to a still manageable level. 'As North America is particularly exposed to all kinds of weather risks, it especially would benefit from this', added Höppe." http://www.munichre.com/en/media_relations/press_releases/2012/2012_10_17_press_release.aspx

maybe you dont understand my position here...when you have a Wiki page devoted to listing the hurricanes hitting your city, and there are too many to count, and one in particular drops 30 inches of snow on Oct 9th...in NYC no less, its a stretch to say this storm is unprecedented. And the records only go back a couple hundred years...and accurate ones even less. It was a storm...there WILL be another.

Your position on this is quite clear. You mis-use the fact that severe weather has ALWAYS occurred to attempt to diminish the fact that climate change is likely making the effects of storms like Sandy more severe. Sandy was not a severe storm by itself. Its power was magnified by jet stream deformation linked to Arctic warming and shrinking polar ice.

to believe anything uttered from the climate alarmists takes a "willing suspension of disbelief" (to use Hillary's words)

OK....QUICK!......everyone stop driving, we need to have laws against reproduction because the world population is impacting the environment, immediately we need to stop using fossil fuels, stop big Agra, close factories an stop all coal mining, beef needs to be outlawed as we know that cow flatulence causes global warming. We need to embrace euthanasia and allow the government to make end of life decisions, stop fishing the oceans and stop all commerce that might pollute. Oh and public transportation should be the only way to travel, no more personal vehicles. Moreover, if you want to water your lawn, go shopping or drive your car, you will need to ask permission of the town in which you live. Yes, this is what progressives and (Bruce) really want. Complete control over the behavior of others using the globull warming agenda and hysteria.

It should be noted that my post to which the usual suspects responded was largely from one the world's leading re-insurance companies. They're most interested in risk assessment, and they see increased risk of losses from on-going climate change. But from the tone of the 2 posts, the Carpers would like everyone to think MunichRe is just making stuff up. When they're unable to address the facts, the Carp Per Diems change the subject, use a straw man, or try to reframe the debate--anything to avoid dealing with the facts. That they do this repeatedly amounts to trolling, and is exemplified in the 2 posts above. Despite the misleading content of the 2 posts, the effects of a warming climate are on-going, and indisputable. "Climate changes are underway in the United States and are projected to grow. 
Climate-related changes are already observed in the United States and its coastal waters. These include increases in heavy downpours, rising temperature and sea level, rapidly retreating glaciers, thawing permafrost, lengthening growing seasons, lengthening ice-free seasons in the ocean and on lakes and rivers, earlier snowmelt, and alterations in river flows. These changes are projected to grow. Widespread climate-related impacts are occurring now and are expected to increase. 
Climate changes are already affecting water, energy, transportation, agriculture, ecosystems, and health. These impacts are different from region to region and will grow under projected climate change. Climate change will stress water resources. 
Water is an issue in every region, but the nature of the potential impacts varies. Drought, related to reduced precipitation, increased evaporation, and increased water loss from plants, is an important issue in many regions, especially in the West. Floods and water quality problems are likely to be amplified by climate change in most regions. Declines in mountain snowpack are important in the West and Alaska where snowpack provides vital natural water storage." http://nca2009.globalchange.gov/executive-summary "Heavy rainfall events have increased both in frequency and in intensity by 20%, and are the main cause behind the increase in overall precipitation in the US. The Northeast and Midwest have seen the greatest increase in such events. The frequency of drought has increased in areas such as the Southeast and the West, and decreased in other areas. Rising temperatures make droughts more severe and/or widespread, and also lead to the earlier melting of snowpacks, which can exacerbate problems in vulnerable areas....the bell-curve method makes it possible to say just how much more hot weather there is. Dr Hansen defined extreme conditions as those occurring more than three standard deviations from the mean of his reference curve. In that curve, this would be an eighth of a percent at each end, which is more or less the value in the curve for 1951-61. Nowadays, though, extreme conditions (or, at least, those that would have been considered extreme half a century ago) can be found at any given time in about 8% of the world." http://www.economist.com/node/21560235

Bruce......8%? By the time we are both ready to say goodbye to the Earth, it might be 10%. What is the hurry at 60+ years old to fix it immediately. Reading your posts reminds me of Charlie Brown listening to the teacher; wah, wah, wah wah, wah wah......something is being said but it is not resonating. Your constant over the top hysteria undermines any valid point you may have. "In your face" extremism is a big turnoff and honestly weakens your ability to garner credibility.

FACTS for the readers: New Study: ’2013 ranks as one of the least extreme U.S. weather years ever’– Many bad weather events at ‘historically low levels’.... 'Whether you’re talking about tornadoes, wildfires, extreme heat or hurricanes, the good news is that weather-related disasters in the US are all way down this year compared to recent years and, in some cases, down to historically low levels. http://thesiweather.com/2013/10/18/1100-am-2013-a-year-with-minimal-extreme-weather-events-in-the-us/

Interestingly, nowhere in your link does its author make any claims about long-term trends, nor does he make any claims the this year's trends have any bearing on the facts of climate change. Again, just as one swallow does not make a summer, one year, on one temperate continent, does not necessarily have any bearing on long term trends

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