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PHOTOS: Critters visit Dunbarton Library

  • Mona Headen of Critters 'N Creatures in Merrimack displays a milk snake named Coralita at Dunbarton Library on Tuesday, December 31, 2013. Headen, along with her husband Bill, educated roughly a dozen children and their families on several unusual species.<br/><br/>(WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)

    Mona Headen of Critters 'N Creatures in Merrimack displays a milk snake named Coralita at Dunbarton Library on Tuesday, December 31, 2013. Headen, along with her husband Bill, educated roughly a dozen children and their families on several unusual species.

    (WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)

  • Mona Headen of Critters 'N Creatures in Merrimack talks about the various kinds of armadillos while holding Taco, a three-banded armadillo at Dunbarton Library on Tuesday, December 31, 2013. <br/><br/>(WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)

    Mona Headen of Critters 'N Creatures in Merrimack talks about the various kinds of armadillos while holding Taco, a three-banded armadillo at Dunbarton Library on Tuesday, December 31, 2013.

    (WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)

  • Mona Headen of Critters 'N Creatures in Merrimack displays a milk snake named Coralita at Dunbarton Library on Tuesday, December 31, 2013. Headen, along with her husband Bill, educated roughly a dozen children and their families on several unusual species.<br/><br/>(WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)
  • Mona Headen of Critters 'N Creatures in Merrimack talks about the various kinds of armadillos while holding Taco, a three-banded armadillo at Dunbarton Library on Tuesday, December 31, 2013. <br/><br/>(WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)

As the blue tongue of Indigo the skink flicked in and out, so did the tongues of a handful of mimicking children sitting wide-eyed at Dunbarton library yesterday. Mona and Bill Headen of Critters ‘N Creatures in Merrimack exhibited several unusual animals during their educational show, including a chinchilla named Dusty, a leopard tortoise named Kenya, and Aimee the spotted skunk, named after a skunk’s ability to aim its scented repellent.

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