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N.H. News Roundup

N.H. News Roundup: Old Man gone for 10 years; CollegeHumor.com to the rescue

** FILE ** In this file photo from the 1990's, crews work on the symbolic Old Man of the Mountain in Franconia, N.H. New Hampshire awoke Saturday, May 3, 2003, to find its stern granite symbol of independence and stubbornness, the Old Man of the Mountain, had collapsed into indistinguishable rubble. The fall ended nearly a century of efforts to protect the 40-foot-tall landmark from the same natural forces that created it. Only stabilizing cables and epoxy remained Saturday where the famous ledges had clung. (APPhoto/Jim Cole, File)

** FILE ** In this file photo from the 1990's, crews work on the symbolic Old Man of the Mountain in Franconia, N.H. New Hampshire awoke Saturday, May 3, 2003, to find its stern granite symbol of independence and stubbornness, the Old Man of the Mountain, had collapsed into indistinguishable rubble. The fall ended nearly a century of efforts to protect the 40-foot-tall landmark from the same natural forces that created it. Only stabilizing cables and epoxy remained Saturday where the famous ledges had clung. (APPhoto/Jim Cole, File)

I never knew him, but I hear he was something special.

It’s been a decade since the Old Man on the Mountain collapsed, but Granite Staters haven’t forgotten about it.

The world has changed, and Monitor contributor Sarah Earle wonders if kids today would have the same connection to the symbol of the rugged New Hampshire way of life.

There was a moment of silence this morning at a ceremony at the plaza created in its memory.

But all the years the Old Man was looking over the state might never have been if not for the determination of Edward Geddes.

Even after a decade, some regional businesses are still trying to cope with the famous formation’s fall.

So even though I only met the Old Man on New Hampshire’s state quarter, it’s easy to know he meant so much to the state.

In other news

∎ Earlier in the week we linked to a story about an Epsom man who lost his life savings at a carnival game and only won a banana. Well, one website has come to his aid, and offered to buy that banana off him for $2,600 – the same amount of money he lost when he “won” it.

 The police have captured a suspect in an eel-smuggling ring. Eel can sell internationally for $2,000 per pound.

∎ The parents of James Foley, the journalist who has been missing since November, were scheduled to speak in Boston today during an event celebrating “World Press Freedom Day.”

 Some auto dealership employees have nursed an injured parakeet back to health since it fell out of the sky last week.

∎ The Vermont police have made an arrest 5 months after a Meredith man was hit while putting gas into his car.

∎ The police are on the lookout for the driver of an SUV who pulled over another car in Hudson and threatened to arrest the driver without showing a badge.

∎ UNH senior Nordic skier Liz Guiney has been selected to the Craftsbury Green Racing Project.

∎ Author Katherine Hall Page will be visiting Gibson’s bookstore on Thursday.

(Have ideas for the roundup? Reach web editor Kevin Deane at 369-3302 or email him at kdeane@cmonitor.com. Follow him on Twitter, @CM_KDeane.)

Legacy Comments3

Waltham, I was at a Bette Midler Concert in Manchester about 5 years ago, and she said "How come you granite staters just didn't give The Old Man Of The Mountain Botox"

I don't think Botox would work on a stone face.

All the King's horses and all the King's men, couldn't put ----------.

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