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Homeless protest evictions from Concord campsites

  • Standing on a parked car, 'Bic,' who asked that his real name not be used, stands holding a sign as people gathered in front of the State House in Concord on Tuesday afternoon, May 14, 2013, to rally against the dismantling of homeless camps and the lack of housing options for homeless people. 'Bic' said he is under the age of 21 and this is the second time he has been homeless. Later in the rally, a man driving a green jeep on Main Street yelled obscenities at the group about getting a job. "People legitimately don't understand what it's like to be in this situation," he said.<br/><br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

    Standing on a parked car, 'Bic,' who asked that his real name not be used, stands holding a sign as people gathered in front of the State House in Concord on Tuesday afternoon, May 14, 2013, to rally against the dismantling of homeless camps and the lack of housing options for homeless people. 'Bic' said he is under the age of 21 and this is the second time he has been homeless. Later in the rally, a man driving a green jeep on Main Street yelled obscenities at the group about getting a job. "People legitimately don't understand what it's like to be in this situation," he said.

    (JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

  • Steve Mann and his fiancŽ Leona Hunt, center, listen to speakers in front of the State House on Tuesday afternoon, May 14, 2013, during a rally against the dismantling of the homeless camps and a lack of housing options for homeless people. Mann has been homeless since August, he said. "We're stuck between a rock and a hard place," Mann said. When he moved to Concord in 1985, Mann said he owned a condo and is now living out of his car.<br/><br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

    Steve Mann and his fiancŽ Leona Hunt, center, listen to speakers in front of the State House on Tuesday afternoon, May 14, 2013, during a rally against the dismantling of the homeless camps and a lack of housing options for homeless people. Mann has been homeless since August, he said. "We're stuck between a rock and a hard place," Mann said. When he moved to Concord in 1985, Mann said he owned a condo and is now living out of his car.

    (JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

  • Standing on a parked car, 'Bic,' who asked that his real name not be used, stands holding a sign as people gathered in front of the State House in Concord on Tuesday afternoon, May 14, 2013, to rally against the dismantling of homeless camps and the lack of housing options for homeless people. 'Bic' said he is under the age of 21 and this is the second time he has been homeless. Later in the rally, a man driving a green jeep on Main Street yelled obscenities at the group about getting a job. "People legitimately don't understand what it's like to be in this situation," he said.<br/><br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)
  • Steve Mann and his fiancŽ Leona Hunt, center, listen to speakers in front of the State House on Tuesday afternoon, May 14, 2013, during a rally against the dismantling of the homeless camps and a lack of housing options for homeless people. Mann has been homeless since August, he said. "We're stuck between a rock and a hard place," Mann said. When he moved to Concord in 1985, Mann said he owned a condo and is now living out of his car.<br/><br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

As camps on private property and state land in Concord are cleared for trespassing, Concord’s homeless population and their advocates have one question.

“Where are they supposed to live?”

Marcia Sprague, director of the Concord Homeless Resource Center, asked that question at a rally in front of the State House yesterday afternoon. More than 60 people attended to hold signs, raise awareness and speak about their experiences.

“We cannot take away a campground without offering an alternative,” said Maggie Fogarty, a board member of the Concord Coalition to End Homelessness.

Fogarty and others said the homeless population has been left without an alternative this spring, as the police clear camps on private property and the state forbids camping on its land around Concord.

Many homeless individuals and advocates held signs yesterday: “Stop illegalizing homelessness,” “We have a right to a home,” “Out of sight out of mind? Don’t look the other way.”

Sprague said she understands that the Concord police are enforcing the rights of private property owners, and that state officials chose to clear homeless camps on their property after a number of incidents last year. But that doesn’t change the plight of people living on that land.

“The big picture is everyone has to be off at the same time,” she said.

Jonathan Hopkins said he’s camping on state land off Loudon Road, but it was recently posted with “no camping” signs. He said he plans to stay there because he has nowhere else to go.

“I shall keep out of sight,” he said.

Wendell Ford, who is homeless, said yesterday that it’s difficult to find new camps, and available options are far from the Friendly Kitchen and other resources.

Sean Lambert, a 20-year-old who stayed at the camp behind Everett Arena last summer, asked for an end to stereotypes about the homeless. Lambert said he doesn’t drink or do drugs and he has a job, but he still needs somewhere to stay. He stressed that incidents involving relatively few people caused state officials to clear camps.

“People simply don’t understand,” he said.

Action to clear homeless camps began last year. The police said the camp on state land behind Everett Arena became a serious safety concern after a number of incidents, including the disappearance of a man whose body was later found nearby in the Merrimack River, the drowning of another homeless man who was swimming in the river and an ax attack on one man by another man at the camp.

As state land was posted for trespassing this spring, private property owners asked the Concord police to clear campers from their land between Stickney Avenue and North Main Street. The police began by giving campers notice to leave and then began pressing charges. On a single Sunday, the police issued 18 court summonses for alcohol and trespassing violations.

Barbara Keshen, an attorney for the New Hampshire Civil Liberties Union, spoke yesterday to explain the lawsuit she filed against the state on behalf of three homeless men. She encouraged yesterday’s crowd to attend a court hearing Monday.

“People deserve to be treated with respect, decency and humanity,” Keshen said. “People deserve a place where they can feel safe and they can feel secure and they can live in peace, and that’s what we’re trying to do, is to go into court and to see if the court will listen to the voice of the people.”

The lawsuit is one hope to reverse the evictions from state property, and advocates said their other option was raising awareness at yesterday’s rally.

Fogarty said the idea for the rally came from a Concord Coalition to End Homelessness board meeting Friday. It grew support Monday when they gathered homeless individuals and religious leaders at the Friendly Kitchen.

The protest lasted for about an hour, and few passing pedestrians paused to listen. Some motorists shouted obscenities or honked as they passed on Main Street.

“The reasons people become homeless are myriad, the solutions are complex,” said Ellen Fries, one of the coalition’s board members. “But today, our message is simple: Until we have other solutions, please allow those who are without other options an appropriate place to camp where they will not be harassed as long as they are peaceful and law-abiding.”

(Laura McCrystal can be reached at 369-3312 or
lmccrystal@cmonitor.com or on Twitter @lmccrystal.)

Perhaps the Governor and Legislature could point a finger at this growing issue and open up one of the empty state buildings for shelter. Perhaps the City of Concord could do the same with one of the abandoned school buildings. All have had facilities within them for heat, water, cooking, shower rooms, etc. We closed down the state hospital buildings and put our residents out on the street with no skills, tools, or much else to fend for themselves. Many people since have fallen through the cracks so to speak and live on the street and public lands. We read in this paper recently how 2 homeless men were caught trespassing and stealing metal from a vacant building, perhaps having a place to go to would help cut down on these crimes. We're all going to have to pay for this one way or another so why not open up a building for them? Heat, lights and water are pennies on the dollar compared to what it costs for doing nothing.

how about a site similar to the community gardens?

democrats have controlled every facet of Concord for a long time....this is what you get when you elect democrats.......higher taxes, more homeless and absolutely Zero, None, Nada solutions....way to go democrats....... they can find $8,000,000 to beautify Main Street and heat the sidewalks but they can even take care of the weeds growing up in every curb

Many of our homeless are mentally ill, thrown out on the street when the State made the decision to close the N.H. Hospital. They have been with us for many years. However, a large portion are folks who are dealing with substance abuse, have criminal records, etc. Also, there are some who are homeless because of hard luck. Solution: Eastman School will be empty when Boys and Girls Club moves into their new building. Big playground there. That is a site something could be done with to house these folks. Are there other empty buildings that could lend themselves. If this were done, it should be work for services. The City could use help in many areas. How about business owners, got any jobs for these folks. Many of the homeless have come from other towns. Perhaps those towns need to step up. I have said it and will repeat it! You do not instill dignity and self-worth into a person by enabling their lifestyle and making them dependent on you forever.

Most of us are one paycheck and a few months away from being homeless. The issue with homeless camps would be the precedent it sets. Here are some ideas to solve the problem. Cut the Obama vacations and White House over the top spending. Probable savings would be around $10,000,000+, how many homeless could be housed for that price. Next, all members of Congress should take 20% pay cuts and that money, as much as it might be should be funneled to the homeless. That grant of $4 million for renovation of the downtown should be converted into housing for the homeless. We have the money to solve this problem which is a priority over many of the wasteful things that we spend on now. The GAO waste and duplication report calls for $267B in waste, fraud and duplication. Obama could make that happen tomorrow and funnel those funds to help the homeless. It is all about priorities.......it is NOT about more money taken from taxpayers. There is so much waste in government that the money could be found and shifted.

great words falling on the ears of liberals that simply dont care.....democrats talk a good game and have been able to fool a whole host of groups that they mean well but every time they are elected they never ever deliver....that is why the democrats hashave earned the nickname of the "low information voter"

Those are great words for a tea-party member. You guys, yourself and Itsa, could be hero's in the union Leader comments section...

uncontested FACT is that when it comes to serving the people in need the conservatives have always out served, out performed out fund raised and out donated time and energy than the liberals.....democrats talk a big game but ask anybody how this congress and Obama are doing helping those in need and you will see thumbs down.....Obama and the democrats have even cut the funds for Community Action Agencies that serve the poor

Interesting to note...All the organizations, all the people, all the donations and volunteers, provide nearly everything the homeless need, except a home.

Those state and non-profit jobs are not in place to solve the homeless problem, they are there to maintain their personal status of employment. No homeless, no worky worky.

Well, you are correct about that. Social work is admirable on one hand and self perpetuating and self serving on the other hand.

BIG Govt massive over regulation has killed the non profit missions

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