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State buried under a foot of snow

Gunner Blais, 9, tosses a snowball for his dog Diesel while shoveling snow with his parents Nick and Johanna Blais in their driveway in Franklin on Sunday, December 15, 2013. The Blais family had spent about three hours shoveling after the first major snowstorm of the season blanketed the region overnight with several inches of snow.  

(WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)

Gunner Blais, 9, tosses a snowball for his dog Diesel while shoveling snow with his parents Nick and Johanna Blais in their driveway in Franklin on Sunday, December 15, 2013. The Blais family had spent about three hours shoveling after the first major snowstorm of the season blanketed the region overnight with several inches of snow. (WILL PARSON / Monitor staff)

The first major snowstorm to hit New Hampshire this winter dumped more than a foot of snow in central parts of the state, complicating driving conditions but not otherwise leading to any severe accidents or power outages as of yesterday afternoon, officials said.

Heavy snowfall began Saturday evening and persisted through yesterday morning, tapering off about midday. The National Weather Service reported a light mix of snow and sleet through the early afternoon, and predicted wind chill values could dip as low as minus 10 degrees through the night. It advised drivers to be cautious of slippery conditions.

Aside from a few minor accidents, Nick King, a management operator at the Department of Transportation, said, “This was probably a nice storm.”

“It came and it went,” he said yesterday afternoon. “Everything is black and dry at this point.”

King said plow crews worked through Saturday night and yesterday morning to clear roads and that his department would continue monitoring conditions through the evening.

As of mid-afternoon yesterday, neither PSNH, Unitil nor the New Hampshire Electric Co-op were reporting any major power outages.

In Concord, city officials declared a ban on street parking beginning this morning at midnight and lasting until 7 a.m.

(Jeremy Blackman can be reached at 369-3319, jblackman@cmonitor.com or on Twitter @JBlackmanCM.)

Legacy Comments1

I find it slightly amusing at the way the media portrays snow in NH. All the adjectives used to describe what once was a regular happening in this State, snow fall. The once hardy Yankee has been replaced by those that worry about the slightest amount of snow. I know the tired cliche "When I was a kid", but I have talked to many of my former classmates and none of us ever recall "Snow Days". I have many photos of our mailbox covered by snowbanks on Thanksgiving in the late 60's. Around the Great Lakes with lake effect snow, even 12" is considered little more than a dusting. What we got Tuesday would just be called pretty. This is NH, it snows in the winter, how is this news?

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