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Amanda Knox’s murder conviction upheld on appeal

  • FILE PHOTOS COMBO - File photos combo shows, from left; Italian student Raffaele Sollecito, slain 21-year-old British woman Meredith Kercher, her American roommate Amanda Knox. Few international criminal cases have cleaved along national biases as that of American student Amanda Knox, awaiting half world away her third Italian court verdict in the 2007 slaying of her British roommate, 21-year-old Meredith Kercher. Whatever is decided this week, the protracted legal battle that has grabbed global headlines and polarized trial-watchers in three nations probably won't end in Florence. With the first two trials producing flip-flop guilty-then-innocent verdicts against Knox and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address errors in the appeals acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/files)

    FILE PHOTOS COMBO - File photos combo shows, from left; Italian student Raffaele Sollecito, slain 21-year-old British woman Meredith Kercher, her American roommate Amanda Knox. Few international criminal cases have cleaved along national biases as that of American student Amanda Knox, awaiting half world away her third Italian court verdict in the 2007 slaying of her British roommate, 21-year-old Meredith Kercher. Whatever is decided this week, the protracted legal battle that has grabbed global headlines and polarized trial-watchers in three nations probably won't end in Florence. With the first two trials producing flip-flop guilty-then-innocent verdicts against Knox and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address errors in the appeals acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/files)

  • FILE - In this Monday, June 10, 2013 file photo, Ernst von Freyberg, president of the Vatican Bank I.O.R. (Istituto per le Opere Religiose), talks with the Associated Press during an interview at his office in Vatican City. The Vatican bank's much-publicized financial reform has hit a small glitch: The bank told dozens and perhaps hundreds of widows and Vatican pensioners that they had to close their accounts or risk losing access to their money as part of Pope Francis' reform efforts. Only the bank now says these account-holders were targeted as a result of a "technical error" and are being kept on as clients after all, an embarrassing rollback that comes as the Vatican seeks to mend ties with Italian authorities who have long suspected Italians were using the Vatican as an off-shore tax haven, The Associated Press has learned. Bank President Ernst Von Freyberg penned a letter to these clients Sept. 19, telling them to come to the bank before Nov. 30 to transfer their money out because they no longer fit the criteria of account-holders set by the board. He warned that if they didn't meet the deadline, their money would become subject to the "internal dispositions" of the bank, according to a copy of the letter obtained by AP. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis, File)

    FILE - In this Monday, June 10, 2013 file photo, Ernst von Freyberg, president of the Vatican Bank I.O.R. (Istituto per le Opere Religiose), talks with the Associated Press during an interview at his office in Vatican City. The Vatican bank's much-publicized financial reform has hit a small glitch: The bank told dozens and perhaps hundreds of widows and Vatican pensioners that they had to close their accounts or risk losing access to their money as part of Pope Francis' reform efforts. Only the bank now says these account-holders were targeted as a result of a "technical error" and are being kept on as clients after all, an embarrassing rollback that comes as the Vatican seeks to mend ties with Italian authorities who have long suspected Italians were using the Vatican as an off-shore tax haven, The Associated Press has learned. Bank President Ernst Von Freyberg penned a letter to these clients Sept. 19, telling them to come to the bank before Nov. 30 to transfer their money out because they no longer fit the criteria of account-holders set by the board. He warned that if they didn't meet the deadline, their money would become subject to the "internal dispositions" of the bank, according to a copy of the letter obtained by AP. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis, File)

  • FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014 file photo, a graffiti depicting Pope Francis as Superman and holding a bag with a writing which reads: "Values" is seen on a wall of the Borgo Pio district near St. Peter's Square in Rome. Pope Francis’ status as a superhero has bit the dust. Rome’s decorum police early Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, scrubbed the wall near the Vatican where “SuperPope” had been displayed, showing Francis as Superman in flight and clutching his black satchel of values to spread to the world. Artist Mauro Pallotta had put the image up on Monday in homage to Francis. Pallotta’s agent, Margaret Porpiglia said Thursday the artist is now hoping to avoid a city fine but is considering making a street art piece depicting the “anti-hero” Rome Mayor Ignazio Marino. The white caped crusader pope, which was actually painted on paper and affixed to the wall with water-based glue, had drawn immense popular interest around the Borgo neighborhood of tiny cobble stoned streets near St. Peter’s Square. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia, File)

    FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014 file photo, a graffiti depicting Pope Francis as Superman and holding a bag with a writing which reads: "Values" is seen on a wall of the Borgo Pio district near St. Peter's Square in Rome. Pope Francis’ status as a superhero has bit the dust. Rome’s decorum police early Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, scrubbed the wall near the Vatican where “SuperPope” had been displayed, showing Francis as Superman in flight and clutching his black satchel of values to spread to the world. Artist Mauro Pallotta had put the image up on Monday in homage to Francis. Pallotta’s agent, Margaret Porpiglia said Thursday the artist is now hoping to avoid a city fine but is considering making a street art piece depicting the “anti-hero” Rome Mayor Ignazio Marino. The white caped crusader pope, which was actually painted on paper and affixed to the wall with water-based glue, had drawn immense popular interest around the Borgo neighborhood of tiny cobble stoned streets near St. Peter’s Square. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia, File)

  • The wall, left, where the image depicting Pope Francis as Superman was posted, is seen empty at the Borgo Pio district near St. Peter's Square in Rome, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. Pope Francis’ status as a superhero has bit the dust. Rome’s decorum police early Thursday scrubbed the wall near the Vatican where “SuperPope” had been displayed, showing Francis as Superman in flight and clutching his black satchel of values to spread to the world. Artist Mauro Pallotta had put the image up on Monday in homage to Francis. Pallotta’s agent, Margaret Porpiglia said Thursday the artist is now hoping to avoid a city fine but is considering making a street art piece depicting the “anti-hero” Rome Mayor Ignazio Marino. The white caped crusader pope, which was actually painted on paper and affixed to the wall with water-based glue, had drawn immense popular interest around the Borgo neighborhood of tiny cobble stoned streets near St. Peter’s Square. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

    The wall, left, where the image depicting Pope Francis as Superman was posted, is seen empty at the Borgo Pio district near St. Peter's Square in Rome, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. Pope Francis’ status as a superhero has bit the dust. Rome’s decorum police early Thursday scrubbed the wall near the Vatican where “SuperPope” had been displayed, showing Francis as Superman in flight and clutching his black satchel of values to spread to the world. Artist Mauro Pallotta had put the image up on Monday in homage to Francis. Pallotta’s agent, Margaret Porpiglia said Thursday the artist is now hoping to avoid a city fine but is considering making a street art piece depicting the “anti-hero” Rome Mayor Ignazio Marino. The white caped crusader pope, which was actually painted on paper and affixed to the wall with water-based glue, had drawn immense popular interest around the Borgo neighborhood of tiny cobble stoned streets near St. Peter’s Square. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

  • FILE - This is an undated file photo released by the Italian Police of 22-year-old murdered British university student Meredith Kercher. Few international criminal cases have cleaved along national biases as that of American student Amanda Knox, awaiting half world away her third Italian court verdict in the 2007 slaying of her British roommate, 21-year-old Meredith Kercher. Whatever is decided this week, the protracted legal battle that has grabbed global headlines and polarized trial-watchers in three nations probably won't end in Florence. With the first two trials producing flip-flop guilty-then-innocent verdicts against Knox and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address errors in the appeals acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Italian Police, File)

    FILE - This is an undated file photo released by the Italian Police of 22-year-old murdered British university student Meredith Kercher. Few international criminal cases have cleaved along national biases as that of American student Amanda Knox, awaiting half world away her third Italian court verdict in the 2007 slaying of her British roommate, 21-year-old Meredith Kercher. Whatever is decided this week, the protracted legal battle that has grabbed global headlines and polarized trial-watchers in three nations probably won't end in Florence. With the first two trials producing flip-flop guilty-then-innocent verdicts against Knox and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address errors in the appeals acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Italian Police, File)

  • FILE - In this Tuesday Sept. 16, 2008 file photo, then murder suspect Amanda Knox is escorted by Italian penitentiary police officers from Perugia's court after a hearing, central Italy. Few international criminal cases have cleaved along national biases as that of American student Amanda Knox, awaiting half world away her third Italian court verdict in the 2007 slaying of her British roommate, 21-year-old Meredith Kercher. Whatever is decided this week, the protracted legal battle that has grabbed global headlines and polarized trial-watchers in three nations probably won't end in Florence. With the first two trials producing flip-flop guilty-then-innocent verdicts against Knox and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address errors in the appeals acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, with a verdict expected later in the day .(AP Photo/Antonio Calanni, File)

    FILE - In this Tuesday Sept. 16, 2008 file photo, then murder suspect Amanda Knox is escorted by Italian penitentiary police officers from Perugia's court after a hearing, central Italy. Few international criminal cases have cleaved along national biases as that of American student Amanda Knox, awaiting half world away her third Italian court verdict in the 2007 slaying of her British roommate, 21-year-old Meredith Kercher. Whatever is decided this week, the protracted legal battle that has grabbed global headlines and polarized trial-watchers in three nations probably won't end in Florence. With the first two trials producing flip-flop guilty-then-innocent verdicts against Knox and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address errors in the appeals acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, with a verdict expected later in the day .(AP Photo/Antonio Calanni, File)

  • A picture taken Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014 showing an exterior view of the offices of the Vatican bank IOR at the Vatican. The Vatican bank's much-publicized financial reform has hit a small glitch: The bank told dozens and perhaps hundreds of widows and Vatican pensioners that they had to close their accounts or risk losing access to their money as part of Pope Francis' reform efforts. Only the bank now says these account-holders were targeted as a result of a "technical error" and are being kept on as clients after all, an embarrassing rollback that comes as the Vatican seeks to mend ties with Italian authorities who have long suspected Italians were using the Vatican as an off-shore tax haven, The Associated Press has learned. Bank President Ernst Von Freyberg penned a letter to these clients Sept. 19, telling them to come to the bank before Nov. 30 to transfer their money out because they no longer fit the criteria of account-holders set by the board. He warned that if they didn't meet the deadline, their money would become subject to the "internal dispositions" of the bank, according to a copy of the letter obtained by AP. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis)

    A picture taken Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014 showing an exterior view of the offices of the Vatican bank IOR at the Vatican. The Vatican bank's much-publicized financial reform has hit a small glitch: The bank told dozens and perhaps hundreds of widows and Vatican pensioners that they had to close their accounts or risk losing access to their money as part of Pope Francis' reform efforts. Only the bank now says these account-holders were targeted as a result of a "technical error" and are being kept on as clients after all, an embarrassing rollback that comes as the Vatican seeks to mend ties with Italian authorities who have long suspected Italians were using the Vatican as an off-shore tax haven, The Associated Press has learned. Bank President Ernst Von Freyberg penned a letter to these clients Sept. 19, telling them to come to the bank before Nov. 30 to transfer their money out because they no longer fit the criteria of account-holders set by the board. He warned that if they didn't meet the deadline, their money would become subject to the "internal dispositions" of the bank, according to a copy of the letter obtained by AP. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis)

  • TWO PICTURES COMBO - A two pictures combo showing the wall where the image depicting Pope Francis as Superman was posted, at the Borgo Pio district near St. Peter's Square in Rome, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. Pope Francis’ status as a superhero has bit the dust. Rome’s decorum police early Thursday scrubbed the wall near the Vatican where “SuperPope” had been displayed, showing Francis as Superman in flight and clutching his black satchel of values to spread to the world. Artist Mauro Pallotta had put the image up on Monday in homage to Francis. Pallotta’s agent, Margaret Porpiglia said Thursday the artist is now hoping to avoid a city fine but is considering making a street art piece depicting the “anti-hero” Rome Mayor Ignazio Marino. The white caped crusader pope, which was actually painted on paper and affixed to the wall with water-based glue, had drawn immense popular interest around the Borgo neighborhood of tiny cobble stoned streets near St. Peter’s Square. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

    TWO PICTURES COMBO - A two pictures combo showing the wall where the image depicting Pope Francis as Superman was posted, at the Borgo Pio district near St. Peter's Square in Rome, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. Pope Francis’ status as a superhero has bit the dust. Rome’s decorum police early Thursday scrubbed the wall near the Vatican where “SuperPope” had been displayed, showing Francis as Superman in flight and clutching his black satchel of values to spread to the world. Artist Mauro Pallotta had put the image up on Monday in homage to Francis. Pallotta’s agent, Margaret Porpiglia said Thursday the artist is now hoping to avoid a city fine but is considering making a street art piece depicting the “anti-hero” Rome Mayor Ignazio Marino. The white caped crusader pope, which was actually painted on paper and affixed to the wall with water-based glue, had drawn immense popular interest around the Borgo neighborhood of tiny cobble stoned streets near St. Peter’s Square. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

  • FILE - In this Nov. 2, 2007 file photo, Italian student Raffaele Sollecito, then boyfriend of American student Amanda Knox, stands outside the rented house where 21-year-old British student Meredith Kercher was found dead on Nov 1, in Perugia, Italy. Few international criminal cases have cleaved along national biases as that of American student Amanda Knox, awaiting half world away her third Italian court verdict in the 2007 slaying of her British roommate Kercher. Whatever is decided this week, the protracted legal battle that has grabbed global headlines and polarized trial-watchers in three nations probably won't end in Florence. With the first two trials producing flip-flop guilty-then-innocent verdicts against Knox and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address errors in the appeals acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, with a verdict expected later in the day. .(AP Photo/Stefano Medici, file)

    FILE - In this Nov. 2, 2007 file photo, Italian student Raffaele Sollecito, then boyfriend of American student Amanda Knox, stands outside the rented house where 21-year-old British student Meredith Kercher was found dead on Nov 1, in Perugia, Italy. Few international criminal cases have cleaved along national biases as that of American student Amanda Knox, awaiting half world away her third Italian court verdict in the 2007 slaying of her British roommate Kercher. Whatever is decided this week, the protracted legal battle that has grabbed global headlines and polarized trial-watchers in three nations probably won't end in Florence. With the first two trials producing flip-flop guilty-then-innocent verdicts against Knox and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address errors in the appeals acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, with a verdict expected later in the day. .(AP Photo/Stefano Medici, file)

  • Diya "Patrick" Lumumba, a Congolese citizen who was originally jailed for the murder of Meredith Kercher, leaves the court building on the occasion of  the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

    Diya "Patrick" Lumumba, a Congolese citizen who was originally jailed for the murder of Meredith Kercher, leaves the court building on the occasion of the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing, and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

  • Raffaele Sollecito lawyer Luca Maori arrives for the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

    Raffaele Sollecito lawyer Luca Maori arrives for the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing, and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

  • Francesco Maresca, lawyer for the Kercher family, arrives for the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

    Francesco Maresca, lawyer for the Kercher family, arrives for the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing, and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

  • Raffaele Sollecito, left, and his father Francesco leave after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

    Raffaele Sollecito, left, and his father Francesco leave after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing, and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

  • Raffaele Sollecito, left, and his father Francesco leave after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

    Raffaele Sollecito, left, and his father Francesco leave after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing, and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

  • Raffaele Sollecito is flanked by his aunt Sara Achille, right, as he leaves after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

    Raffaele Sollecito is flanked by his aunt Sara Achille, right, as he leaves after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing, and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

  • Raffaele Sollecito is flanked by his stepmother Mara Papagni, left, and his aunt Sara Achille, right, as he leaves after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

    Raffaele Sollecito is flanked by his stepmother Mara Papagni, left, and his aunt Sara Achille, right, as he leaves after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing, and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

  • Raffaele Sollecito, left, and his father Francesco leave after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

    Raffaele Sollecito, left, and his father Francesco leave after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing, and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

  • Raffaele Sollecito is flanked by his stepmother Mara Papagni, left, and his aunt Sara Achille, right, as he leaves after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

    Raffaele Sollecito is flanked by his stepmother Mara Papagni, left, and his aunt Sara Achille, right, as he leaves after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing, and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

  • Raffaele Sollecito leaves after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

    Raffaele Sollecito leaves after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing, and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

  • Raffaele Sollecito talks with his stepmother Mara Papagni prior to the start of the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Lapresse) ITALY OUT

    Raffaele Sollecito talks with his stepmother Mara Papagni prior to the start of the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing, and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Lapresse) ITALY OUT

  • Raffaele Sollecito talks with his stepmother Mara Papagni prior to the start of the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Fabrizio Giovannozzi)

    Raffaele Sollecito talks with his stepmother Mara Papagni prior to the start of the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing, and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Fabrizio Giovannozzi)

  • Raffaele Sollecito talks with an unidentified man prior to the start of the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Fabrizio Giovannozzi)

    Raffaele Sollecito talks with an unidentified man prior to the start of the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing, and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Fabrizio Giovannozzi)

  • FILE PHOTOS COMBO - File photos combo shows, from left; Italian student Raffaele Sollecito, slain 21-year-old British woman Meredith Kercher, her American roommate Amanda Knox. Few international criminal cases have cleaved along national biases as that of American student Amanda Knox, awaiting half world away her third Italian court verdict in the 2007 slaying of her British roommate, 21-year-old Meredith Kercher. Whatever is decided this week, the protracted legal battle that has grabbed global headlines and polarized trial-watchers in three nations probably won't end in Florence. With the first two trials producing flip-flop guilty-then-innocent verdicts against Knox and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address errors in the appeals acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/files)
  • FILE - In this Monday, June 10, 2013 file photo, Ernst von Freyberg, president of the Vatican Bank I.O.R. (Istituto per le Opere Religiose), talks with the Associated Press during an interview at his office in Vatican City. The Vatican bank's much-publicized financial reform has hit a small glitch: The bank told dozens and perhaps hundreds of widows and Vatican pensioners that they had to close their accounts or risk losing access to their money as part of Pope Francis' reform efforts. Only the bank now says these account-holders were targeted as a result of a "technical error" and are being kept on as clients after all, an embarrassing rollback that comes as the Vatican seeks to mend ties with Italian authorities who have long suspected Italians were using the Vatican as an off-shore tax haven, The Associated Press has learned. Bank President Ernst Von Freyberg penned a letter to these clients Sept. 19, telling them to come to the bank before Nov. 30 to transfer their money out because they no longer fit the criteria of account-holders set by the board. He warned that if they didn't meet the deadline, their money would become subject to the "internal dispositions" of the bank, according to a copy of the letter obtained by AP. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis, File)
  • FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014 file photo, a graffiti depicting Pope Francis as Superman and holding a bag with a writing which reads: "Values" is seen on a wall of the Borgo Pio district near St. Peter's Square in Rome. Pope Francis’ status as a superhero has bit the dust. Rome’s decorum police early Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, scrubbed the wall near the Vatican where “SuperPope” had been displayed, showing Francis as Superman in flight and clutching his black satchel of values to spread to the world. Artist Mauro Pallotta had put the image up on Monday in homage to Francis. Pallotta’s agent, Margaret Porpiglia said Thursday the artist is now hoping to avoid a city fine but is considering making a street art piece depicting the “anti-hero” Rome Mayor Ignazio Marino. The white caped crusader pope, which was actually painted on paper and affixed to the wall with water-based glue, had drawn immense popular interest around the Borgo neighborhood of tiny cobble stoned streets near St. Peter’s Square. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia, File)
  • The wall, left, where the image depicting Pope Francis as Superman was posted, is seen empty at the Borgo Pio district near St. Peter's Square in Rome, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. Pope Francis’ status as a superhero has bit the dust. Rome’s decorum police early Thursday scrubbed the wall near the Vatican where “SuperPope” had been displayed, showing Francis as Superman in flight and clutching his black satchel of values to spread to the world. Artist Mauro Pallotta had put the image up on Monday in homage to Francis. Pallotta’s agent, Margaret Porpiglia said Thursday the artist is now hoping to avoid a city fine but is considering making a street art piece depicting the “anti-hero” Rome Mayor Ignazio Marino. The white caped crusader pope, which was actually painted on paper and affixed to the wall with water-based glue, had drawn immense popular interest around the Borgo neighborhood of tiny cobble stoned streets near St. Peter’s Square. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)
  • FILE - This is an undated file photo released by the Italian Police of 22-year-old murdered British university student Meredith Kercher. Few international criminal cases have cleaved along national biases as that of American student Amanda Knox, awaiting half world away her third Italian court verdict in the 2007 slaying of her British roommate, 21-year-old Meredith Kercher. Whatever is decided this week, the protracted legal battle that has grabbed global headlines and polarized trial-watchers in three nations probably won't end in Florence. With the first two trials producing flip-flop guilty-then-innocent verdicts against Knox and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address errors in the appeals acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Italian Police, File)
  • FILE - In this Tuesday Sept. 16, 2008 file photo, then murder suspect Amanda Knox is escorted by Italian penitentiary police officers from Perugia's court after a hearing, central Italy. Few international criminal cases have cleaved along national biases as that of American student Amanda Knox, awaiting half world away her third Italian court verdict in the 2007 slaying of her British roommate, 21-year-old Meredith Kercher. Whatever is decided this week, the protracted legal battle that has grabbed global headlines and polarized trial-watchers in three nations probably won't end in Florence. With the first two trials producing flip-flop guilty-then-innocent verdicts against Knox and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address errors in the appeals acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, with a verdict expected later in the day .(AP Photo/Antonio Calanni, File)
  • A picture taken Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014 showing an exterior view of the offices of the Vatican bank IOR at the Vatican. The Vatican bank's much-publicized financial reform has hit a small glitch: The bank told dozens and perhaps hundreds of widows and Vatican pensioners that they had to close their accounts or risk losing access to their money as part of Pope Francis' reform efforts. Only the bank now says these account-holders were targeted as a result of a "technical error" and are being kept on as clients after all, an embarrassing rollback that comes as the Vatican seeks to mend ties with Italian authorities who have long suspected Italians were using the Vatican as an off-shore tax haven, The Associated Press has learned. Bank President Ernst Von Freyberg penned a letter to these clients Sept. 19, telling them to come to the bank before Nov. 30 to transfer their money out because they no longer fit the criteria of account-holders set by the board. He warned that if they didn't meet the deadline, their money would become subject to the "internal dispositions" of the bank, according to a copy of the letter obtained by AP. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis)
  • TWO PICTURES COMBO - A two pictures combo showing the wall where the image depicting Pope Francis as Superman was posted, at the Borgo Pio district near St. Peter's Square in Rome, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. Pope Francis’ status as a superhero has bit the dust. Rome’s decorum police early Thursday scrubbed the wall near the Vatican where “SuperPope” had been displayed, showing Francis as Superman in flight and clutching his black satchel of values to spread to the world. Artist Mauro Pallotta had put the image up on Monday in homage to Francis. Pallotta’s agent, Margaret Porpiglia said Thursday the artist is now hoping to avoid a city fine but is considering making a street art piece depicting the “anti-hero” Rome Mayor Ignazio Marino. The white caped crusader pope, which was actually painted on paper and affixed to the wall with water-based glue, had drawn immense popular interest around the Borgo neighborhood of tiny cobble stoned streets near St. Peter’s Square. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)
  • FILE - In this Nov. 2, 2007 file photo, Italian student Raffaele Sollecito, then boyfriend of American student Amanda Knox, stands outside the rented house where 21-year-old British student Meredith Kercher was found dead on Nov 1, in Perugia, Italy. Few international criminal cases have cleaved along national biases as that of American student Amanda Knox, awaiting half world away her third Italian court verdict in the 2007 slaying of her British roommate Kercher. Whatever is decided this week, the protracted legal battle that has grabbed global headlines and polarized trial-watchers in three nations probably won't end in Florence. With the first two trials producing flip-flop guilty-then-innocent verdicts against Knox and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address errors in the appeals acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, with a verdict expected later in the day. .(AP Photo/Stefano Medici, file)
  • Diya "Patrick" Lumumba, a Congolese citizen who was originally jailed for the murder of Meredith Kercher, leaves the court building on the occasion of  the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
  • Raffaele Sollecito lawyer Luca Maori arrives for the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
  • Francesco Maresca, lawyer for the Kercher family, arrives for the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
  • Raffaele Sollecito, left, and his father Francesco leave after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
  • Raffaele Sollecito, left, and his father Francesco leave after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
  • Raffaele Sollecito is flanked by his aunt Sara Achille, right, as he leaves after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
  • Raffaele Sollecito is flanked by his stepmother Mara Papagni, left, and his aunt Sara Achille, right, as he leaves after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
  • Raffaele Sollecito, left, and his father Francesco leave after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
  • Raffaele Sollecito is flanked by his stepmother Mara Papagni, left, and his aunt Sara Achille, right, as he leaves after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
  • Raffaele Sollecito leaves after attending the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
  • Raffaele Sollecito talks with his stepmother Mara Papagni prior to the start of the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Lapresse) ITALY OUT
  • Raffaele Sollecito talks with his stepmother Mara Papagni prior to the start of the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Fabrizio Giovannozzi)
  • Raffaele Sollecito talks with an unidentified man prior to the start of the final hearing before the third court verdict for the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, in Florence, Italy, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. The first two trials produced flip-flop verdicts of guilty then innocent for Kercher former roommate, American student Amanda Knox, who is not attending the hearing,  and her former Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, and the case has produced harshly clashing versions of events. A Florence appeals panel designated by Italy's supreme court to address issues it raised about the acquittal is set to deliberate Thursday, with a verdict expected later in the day. (AP Photo/Fabrizio Giovannozzi)

More than two years after Amanda Knox returned home to the United States a free woman, an Italian court yesterday reinstated her murder conviction in the stabbing of her roommate and increased her sentence to 28½ years in prison, raising the specter of a long, drawn-out extradition fight.

Knox, 26, received word of the verdict in her hometown of Seattle. The former American exchange student called it unjust and said she was “frightened and saddened.”

“This has gotten out of hand,” Knox said in a statement. “Having been found innocent before, I expected better from the Italian justice system.”

Lawyers for Knox and her ex-boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito, who was also found guilty, vowed to appeal to Italy’s highest court, a process that will take at least another year and drag out a seesaw legal battle that has fascinated court-watchers on both sides of the Atlantic.

After nearly 12 hours of deliberations yesterday, the appeals court in Florence reinstated the guilty verdicts first handed down against Knox and Sollecito in 2009 for the slaying of British exchange student Meredith Kercher.

Those verdicts had been overturned in a second trial that ended in an acquittal in 2011, and Knox was released from prison after four years behind bars, returning to the U.S. But Italy’s highest court ordered a third trial.

The Florence court increased Knox’s sentence from the original 26 years and handed Sollecito 25 years.

Kercher, 21, was found dead Nov. 2, 2007, in a pool of blood in the bedroom of the apartment she and Knox shared in the central Italian city of Perugia, where both were studying. Her throat had been slit and she was sexually assaulted.

Knox and Sollecito denied any involvement in the killing, insisting they were at Sollecito’s apartment that night, smoking marijuana, watching a movie and making love.

Prosecutors originally argued that Kercher was killed in a drug-fueled sex game gone awry – an accusation that gave the case a lurid cast that fascinated the European tabloids.

But at the third trial, prosecutors argued instead that the violence stemmed from arguments between roommates Knox and Kercher about cleanliness and was triggered by a toilet left unflushed by the third defendant in the case, Rudy Guede.

Guede, who is from the Ivory Coast, was convicted in a separate trial and is serving a 16-year sentence for the murder.

Legal experts have said it is unlikely that Italy would request Knox’s extradition before the verdict is final.

If the conviction is upheld, a lengthy extradition process will probably ensue, with the U.S. State Department ultimately deciding whether to turn Knox back over to Italian authorities to serve her sentence. Her lawyers are likely to argue that she is the victim of double jeopardy, because she was retried after an acquittal.

“Many Americans are quite astonished by the ups and downs in this case,” said Mary Fan, a former federal prosecutor who teaches at the University of Washington Law School in Seattle.

But Fan said U.S. courts have previously held that being acquitted and then convicted of a crime in another country is not a legal bar to extradition.

U.S. Senator Maria Cantwell, a Democrat from Knox’s home state of Washington, said she was “very concerned and disappointed” by the verdict and confident the appeal would re-examine the decision.

“It is very troubling that Amanda and her family have had to endure this process for so many years,” she said in a statement. “I will continue to closely monitor this case as it moves forward through the Italian legal system.”

Sollecito’s lawyers said they were stunned by the conviction. “There isn’t a shred of proof,” attorney Luca Maori said.

Kercher’s brother and sister were in the courtroom for the verdict and said the outcome was the best they could have hoped for.

“It’s hard to feel anything at the moment because we know it will go to a further appeal,” said her brother, Lyle Kercher. “No matter what the verdict was, it never was going to be a case of celebrating anything.”

In his closing arguments, Knox’s lawyer, Dalla Vedova, had told the court he was “serene” about the verdict because he believed the only conclusion from the files was “the innocence of Amanda Knox.”

The first trial court found Knox and Sollecito guilty of murder and sexual assault based on evidence that include DNA and confused alibis. But the DNA evidence was later deemed unreliable by new experts.

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