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Oklahoma

Execution drugs to be tested

They were used in botched death

  • FILE - In this Tuesday, April 15, 2008 file photo, Terry Crenshaw, wardens assistant at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary, walks past the gurney in the execution chamber at left, in McAlester, Okla. At right are the rows of chairs in which witnesses to executions are seated. Oklahoma prison officials tried for 51 minutes to find a vein in a death row inmate's arms and feet before inserting an IV through the man's groin ahead of a botched execution this week, the state's prisons chief said Thursday in a report urging more oversight of executions. (AP Photo)

    FILE - In this Tuesday, April 15, 2008 file photo, Terry Crenshaw, wardens assistant at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary, walks past the gurney in the execution chamber at left, in McAlester, Okla. At right are the rows of chairs in which witnesses to executions are seated. Oklahoma prison officials tried for 51 minutes to find a vein in a death row inmate's arms and feet before inserting an IV through the man's groin ahead of a botched execution this week, the state's prisons chief said Thursday in a report urging more oversight of executions. (AP Photo)

  • FILE - This file photo combo of images provided by the Oklahoma Department of Corrections shows Clayton Lockett, left, and Charles Warner. Lockett and Warner, two death row inmates whose executions were delayed while they challenged the secrecy behind the state's lethal injection protocol, are scheduled to die Tuesday, April 29, 2014, in Oklahoma's first double execution in nearly 80 years. (AP Photo/Oklahoma Department of Corrections, File)

    FILE - This file photo combo of images provided by the Oklahoma Department of Corrections shows Clayton Lockett, left, and Charles Warner. Lockett and Warner, two death row inmates whose executions were delayed while they challenged the secrecy behind the state's lethal injection protocol, are scheduled to die Tuesday, April 29, 2014, in Oklahoma's first double execution in nearly 80 years. (AP Photo/Oklahoma Department of Corrections, File)

  • FILE - In this Tuesday, April 15, 2008 file photo, Terry Crenshaw, wardens assistant at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary, walks past the gurney in the execution chamber at left, in McAlester, Okla. At right are the rows of chairs in which witnesses to executions are seated. Oklahoma prison officials tried for 51 minutes to find a vein in a death row inmate's arms and feet before inserting an IV through the man's groin ahead of a botched execution this week, the state's prisons chief said Thursday in a report urging more oversight of executions. (AP Photo)
  • FILE - This file photo combo of images provided by the Oklahoma Department of Corrections shows Clayton Lockett, left, and Charles Warner. Lockett and Warner, two death row inmates whose executions were delayed while they challenged the secrecy behind the state's lethal injection protocol, are scheduled to die Tuesday, April 29, 2014, in Oklahoma's first double execution in nearly 80 years. (AP Photo/Oklahoma Department of Corrections, File)

Samples of the same drugs used in a botched execution that was stopped after the inmate convulsed and tried to lift his head will be tested as part of an investigation into his death, a probe that could result in Oklahoma executions being halted for months, officials said yesterday.

Oklahoma’s attorney general’s office said the Department of Corrections saved syringes of the lethal drugs set aside for a second execution set to follow Clayton Lockett’s. The second execution, of Charles Warner, was put on hold for at least two weeks after Lockett’s went awry Tuesday night.

President Obama yesterday called the incident “deeply troubling” and said he’s asked his attorney general for a review of the death penalty’s application.

Lockett died 43 minutes after his execution began of an apparent heart attack as Oklahoma used a new drug combination for the first time in the state.

Officials said yesterday the autopsy report on Lockett will take two to three months to complete. Department of Public Safety spokesman Capt. George Brown said the autopsy, being performed in Dallas, is expected to be finished in eight to 12 weeks. Lockett’s body arrived in Dallas about 12:30 a.m. Thursday.

Gov. Mary Fallin called Wednesday for an investigation of Lockett’s execution to be conducted by the state’s Department of Public Safety. She has issued a stay until May 13 for Warner’s execution, but said Thursday she was willing to issue a 60-day stay for Warner, the longest allowed under state law, if needed to complete the inquiry.

If 60 days is not adequate, Oklahoma’s attorney general has said he would request an additional stay from the courts to ensure no executions are carried out until the review is complete.

The drugs intended for Warner were never used. Assistant Attorney General Kindanne Jones said in a letter yesterday that attorneys for Lockett and Warner may have access to the drugs if any are left over after the state’s analysis is complete.

Before Lockett’s execution, the state had refused to provide the source of the execution drugs, citing state law that allows such details to remain confidential.

The syringes intended for Warner’s execution Tuesday night are from the same manufacturers as the drugs used in Lockett’s execution, the state said yesterday. The drugs were purchased at the same time and have the same expiration date.

Oklahoma Department of Corrections Director Robert Patton had detailed Lockett’s last day of life in a report issued Thursday. The report said Lockett had self-inflicted wounds on his arm, and the execution team was unable to find suitable veins in his arms, legs and neck.

An IV was inserted into Lockett’s groin area and the execution began.

A spokesman for the United Nations human rights office in Geneva said Lockett’s prolonged execution could amount to cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment under international human rights law.

Rupert Colville said Lockett’s was the second problematic execution in the U.S. this year after Dennis McGuire’s death in Ohio on Jan. 16 with an allegedly untested combination of drugs.

“The apparent cruelty involved in these recent executions simply reinforces the argument that authorities across the United States should impose an immediate moratorium on the use of the death penalty and work for abolition of this cruel and inhuman practice,” Colville told reporters yesterday.

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