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Benghazi suspect Ahmed Abu Khattala pleads not guilty before judge

  • This artist's rendering shows United States Magistrate, Judge John Facciola, swearing in the defendant, Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khatallah, wearing a headphone, as his attorney Michelle Peterson looks on during a hearing at the federal U.S. District Court in Washington, Saturday, June 28, 2014. The hearing of the Libyan accused of masterminding deadly Benghazi attacks, lasted ten minutes; he pled not guilty to conspiracy Saturday at his first appearance in U.S. court. (AP Photo/Dana Verkouteren)

    This artist's rendering shows United States Magistrate, Judge John Facciola, swearing in the defendant, Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khatallah, wearing a headphone, as his attorney Michelle Peterson looks on during a hearing at the federal U.S. District Court in Washington, Saturday, June 28, 2014. The hearing of the Libyan accused of masterminding deadly Benghazi attacks, lasted ten minutes; he pled not guilty to conspiracy Saturday at his first appearance in U.S. court. (AP Photo/Dana Verkouteren)

  • The motorcade transporting the Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khattala, accused of masterminding the deadly Benghazi attack at the U.S. embassy, leaves the federal U.S. District Court in Washington Saturday, June 28, 2014, after Khattala pleaded not guilty to conspiracy at his first court appearance in the United States. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

    The motorcade transporting the Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khattala, accused of masterminding the deadly Benghazi attack at the U.S. embassy, leaves the federal U.S. District Court in Washington Saturday, June 28, 2014, after Khattala pleaded not guilty to conspiracy at his first court appearance in the United States. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

  • U.S. Marshalls monitor the area near the federal U.S. District Court in Washington, Saturday, June 28, 2014, after security at the court was heightened in anticipation of a possible court appearance by captured Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khattala later in the day. Khatallah is one of the men accused in the deadly Benghazi attack at the U.S. embassy in Libya. He faces criminal charges in the deaths of the US ambassador to Libya and three other Americans from the Sept. 11, 2012, attack. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

    U.S. Marshalls monitor the area near the federal U.S. District Court in Washington, Saturday, June 28, 2014, after security at the court was heightened in anticipation of a possible court appearance by captured Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khattala later in the day. Khatallah is one of the men accused in the deadly Benghazi attack at the U.S. embassy in Libya. He faces criminal charges in the deaths of the US ambassador to Libya and three other Americans from the Sept. 11, 2012, attack. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

  • U.S. Marshalls move outside the federal U.S. District Court in Washington Saturday, June 28, 2014, after security was heightened in anticipation of a possible court appearance by captured Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khattala later in the day. Khatallah is one of the men accused in the deadly Benghazi attack at the U.S. embassy in Libya. He faces criminal charges in the deaths of the US ambassador to Libya and three other Americans from the Sept. 11, 2012, attack. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

    U.S. Marshalls move outside the federal U.S. District Court in Washington Saturday, June 28, 2014, after security was heightened in anticipation of a possible court appearance by captured Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khattala later in the day. Khatallah is one of the men accused in the deadly Benghazi attack at the U.S. embassy in Libya. He faces criminal charges in the deaths of the US ambassador to Libya and three other Americans from the Sept. 11, 2012, attack. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

  • The motorcade transporting the Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khattala, charged in the deadly Benghazi attack at the U.S. embassy, leaves the federal U.S. District Court in Washington Saturday, June 28, 2014, after Khattala pleaded not guilty to conspiracy at his first appearance in court in the United States. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

    The motorcade transporting the Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khattala, charged in the deadly Benghazi attack at the U.S. embassy, leaves the federal U.S. District Court in Washington Saturday, June 28, 2014, after Khattala pleaded not guilty to conspiracy at his first appearance in court in the United States. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

  • FILE - This undated file image obtained from Facebook shows Ahmed Abu Khattala, an alleged leader of the deadly 2012 attacks on Americans in Benghazi, Libya, who was captured by U.S. special forces on Sunday, June 15, 2014, on the outskirts of Benghazi. Khattala, charged in the 2012 Benghazi attacks, is in U.S. custody amid tight security at the U.S. Federal Courthouse in Washington, Saturday, June 28, 2014. Khattala faces criminal charges in the deaths of the U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other Americans. (AP Photo, File)

    FILE - This undated file image obtained from Facebook shows Ahmed Abu Khattala, an alleged leader of the deadly 2012 attacks on Americans in Benghazi, Libya, who was captured by U.S. special forces on Sunday, June 15, 2014, on the outskirts of Benghazi. Khattala, charged in the 2012 Benghazi attacks, is in U.S. custody amid tight security at the U.S. Federal Courthouse in Washington, Saturday, June 28, 2014. Khattala faces criminal charges in the deaths of the U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other Americans. (AP Photo, File)

  • This artist's rendering shows United States Magistrate, Judge John Facciola, swearing in the defendant, Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khatallah, wearing a headphone, as his attorney Michelle Peterson looks on during a hearing at the federal U.S. District Court in Washington, Saturday, June 28, 2014. The hearing of the Libyan accused of masterminding deadly Benghazi attacks, lasted ten minutes; he pled not guilty to conspiracy Saturday at his first appearance in U.S. court. (AP Photo/Dana Verkouteren)
  • The motorcade transporting the Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khattala, accused of masterminding the deadly Benghazi attack at the U.S. embassy, leaves the federal U.S. District Court in Washington Saturday, June 28, 2014, after Khattala pleaded not guilty to conspiracy at his first court appearance in the United States. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
  • U.S. Marshalls monitor the area near the federal U.S. District Court in Washington, Saturday, June 28, 2014, after security at the court was heightened in anticipation of a possible court appearance by captured Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khattala later in the day. Khatallah is one of the men accused in the deadly Benghazi attack at the U.S. embassy in Libya. He faces criminal charges in the deaths of the US ambassador to Libya and three other Americans from the Sept. 11, 2012, attack. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
  • U.S. Marshalls move outside the federal U.S. District Court in Washington Saturday, June 28, 2014, after security was heightened in anticipation of a possible court appearance by captured Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khattala later in the day. Khatallah is one of the men accused in the deadly Benghazi attack at the U.S. embassy in Libya. He faces criminal charges in the deaths of the US ambassador to Libya and three other Americans from the Sept. 11, 2012, attack. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
  • The motorcade transporting the Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khattala, charged in the deadly Benghazi attack at the U.S. embassy, leaves the federal U.S. District Court in Washington Saturday, June 28, 2014, after Khattala pleaded not guilty to conspiracy at his first appearance in court in the United States. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
  • FILE - This undated file image obtained from Facebook shows Ahmed Abu Khattala, an alleged leader of the deadly 2012 attacks on Americans in Benghazi, Libya, who was captured by U.S. special forces on Sunday, June 15, 2014, on the outskirts of Benghazi. Khattala, charged in the 2012 Benghazi attacks, is in U.S. custody amid tight security at the U.S. Federal Courthouse in Washington, Saturday, June 28, 2014. Khattala faces criminal charges in the deaths of the U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other Americans. (AP Photo, File)

The Libyan militant accused of masterminding the deadly Benghazi attacks that have become a flashpoint in U.S. politics appeared briefly for the first time in an American courtroom, pleading not guilty yesterday to a terrorism-related charge nearly two weeks after he was captured by special forces.

In a 10-minute hearing held amid tight security, Ahmed Abu Khattala spoke just two words, both in Arabic. He replied “yes” when asked to swear to tell the truth and “no” when asked if he was having trouble understanding the proceeding.

Abu Khattala became the most recent foreign terror suspect to be prosecuted in American courts, a forum the Obama administration contends is both fairer and more efficient than the military tribunal process used at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The case was being tried in Washington, D.C., despite concerns from Republicans in Congress who say he should not be entitled to the protections of the U.S. legal system.

A grand jury indictment handed up under seal Thursday and made public yesterday said Abu Khattala participated in a conspiracy to provide material support and resources to terrorists in the attacks of Sept. 11, 2012, that killed U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans.

That crime is punishable by up to life in prison. The government said it soon would file more charges against Abu Khattala.

During his initial court appearance, the defendant listened via headphones to a translation of the proceedings. He wore a two-piece black track suit, had a beard and long curly hair, both mostly gray, and kept his hands, which were not handcuffed, behind his back.

U.S. special forces captured Abu Khattala in Libya two weeks ago, marking the first breakthrough in the investigation. Officials had been questioning Abu Khattala aboard a Navy ship that transported him to the United States. He was flown early yesterday by military helicopter from a Navy ship to a National Park Service landing pad in the city’s Anacostia neighborhood, according to a U.S. official who was not authorized to discuss the transfer publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

QUOTE - "conspiracy to provide material support and resources to terrorists in the attacks" - Guess that proves bruce and the rest of the LIDV's that post here wrong - It also makes Hillary a LIAR - but we already knew that didnt we?. To read a important account on this guy you need to read this: " CIA Operation “Zero Footprint”, Qatar, Benghazi and The Connection To Ahmed Abu Khattala – The Real Motive For The Obama Administration’s Recent Arrest…"

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