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Aid group: W. Africa Ebola outbreak like ‘wartime’

  • In this photo taken on Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014,  people buy food stuff from a woman, right, at a local market in the city of Monrovia, Liberia. The World Food Program says 1 million people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone may need food assistance in the coming months, as measures to slow Ebola’s spread have caused price hikes and slowed the flow of goods to isolated areas. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)

    In this photo taken on Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014, people buy food stuff from a woman, right, at a local market in the city of Monrovia, Liberia. The World Food Program says 1 million people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone may need food assistance in the coming months, as measures to slow Ebola’s spread have caused price hikes and slowed the flow of goods to isolated areas. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)

  • Liberia women walk,  after  praying for help with the Ebola virus, in the city of  Monrovia, Liberia.  Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014. Liberia faced an excruciating choice Thursday: deciding which handful of Ebola patients will receive an experimental drug that could prove either life-saving or life-threatening. ZMapp, the untested Ebola drug, arrived in the West African country late Wednesday. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)

    Liberia women walk, after praying for help with the Ebola virus, in the city of Monrovia, Liberia. Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014. Liberia faced an excruciating choice Thursday: deciding which handful of Ebola patients will receive an experimental drug that could prove either life-saving or life-threatening. ZMapp, the untested Ebola drug, arrived in the West African country late Wednesday. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)

  • Liberian women pray for people infected with the Ebola virus in the city of  Monrovia, Liberia, Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014. Liberian officials faced a difficult choice Thursday: deciding which handful of Ebola patients will receive an experimental drug that could prove life-saving, ineffective or even harmful. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)

    Liberian women pray for people infected with the Ebola virus in the city of Monrovia, Liberia, Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014. Liberian officials faced a difficult choice Thursday: deciding which handful of Ebola patients will receive an experimental drug that could prove life-saving, ineffective or even harmful. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)

  • Liberia policemen, dressed in riot gear disperse a crowd blocking a main road, as they watch health workers deal with the body of a man suspected of dying from the Ebola virus, in the city of  Monrovia, Liberia.  Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014. Liberia faced an excruciating choice Thursday: deciding which handful of Ebola patients will receive an experimental drug that could prove either life-saving or life-threatening. ZMapp, the untested Ebola drug, arrived in the West African country late Wednesday. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)

    Liberia policemen, dressed in riot gear disperse a crowd blocking a main road, as they watch health workers deal with the body of a man suspected of dying from the Ebola virus, in the city of Monrovia, Liberia. Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014. Liberia faced an excruciating choice Thursday: deciding which handful of Ebola patients will receive an experimental drug that could prove either life-saving or life-threatening. ZMapp, the untested Ebola drug, arrived in the West African country late Wednesday. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)

  • A security guard, center, stands outside the Connaught Hospital, where a leading doctor died from Ebola on Wednesday, in Freetown, Sierra Leone, Friday, Aug. 15, 2014. The Ebola outbreak that has killed more than 1,000 people in West Africa could last another six months, Doctors Without Borders said Friday, and a medical worker acknowledged that the true death toll is unknown. (AP Photo/Michael Duff)

    A security guard, center, stands outside the Connaught Hospital, where a leading doctor died from Ebola on Wednesday, in Freetown, Sierra Leone, Friday, Aug. 15, 2014. The Ebola outbreak that has killed more than 1,000 people in West Africa could last another six months, Doctors Without Borders said Friday, and a medical worker acknowledged that the true death toll is unknown. (AP Photo/Michael Duff)

  • A Liberian woman holds up a pamphlet with guidance on how to prevent the Ebola virus from spreading, in the city of Monrovia, Liberia, Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014. Liberian officials faced a difficult choice Thursday: deciding which handful of Ebola patients will receive an experimental drug that could prove life-saving, ineffective or even harmful. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)

    A Liberian woman holds up a pamphlet with guidance on how to prevent the Ebola virus from spreading, in the city of Monrovia, Liberia, Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014. Liberian officials faced a difficult choice Thursday: deciding which handful of Ebola patients will receive an experimental drug that could prove life-saving, ineffective or even harmful. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)

  • In this photo taken on Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014,  people buy food stuff from a woman, right, at a local market in the city of Monrovia, Liberia. The World Food Program says 1 million people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone may need food assistance in the coming months, as measures to slow Ebola’s spread have caused price hikes and slowed the flow of goods to isolated areas. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
  • Liberia women walk,  after  praying for help with the Ebola virus, in the city of  Monrovia, Liberia.  Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014. Liberia faced an excruciating choice Thursday: deciding which handful of Ebola patients will receive an experimental drug that could prove either life-saving or life-threatening. ZMapp, the untested Ebola drug, arrived in the West African country late Wednesday. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
  • Liberian women pray for people infected with the Ebola virus in the city of  Monrovia, Liberia, Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014. Liberian officials faced a difficult choice Thursday: deciding which handful of Ebola patients will receive an experimental drug that could prove life-saving, ineffective or even harmful. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
  • Liberia policemen, dressed in riot gear disperse a crowd blocking a main road, as they watch health workers deal with the body of a man suspected of dying from the Ebola virus, in the city of  Monrovia, Liberia.  Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014. Liberia faced an excruciating choice Thursday: deciding which handful of Ebola patients will receive an experimental drug that could prove either life-saving or life-threatening. ZMapp, the untested Ebola drug, arrived in the West African country late Wednesday. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)
  • A security guard, center, stands outside the Connaught Hospital, where a leading doctor died from Ebola on Wednesday, in Freetown, Sierra Leone, Friday, Aug. 15, 2014. The Ebola outbreak that has killed more than 1,000 people in West Africa could last another six months, Doctors Without Borders said Friday, and a medical worker acknowledged that the true death toll is unknown. (AP Photo/Michael Duff)
  • A Liberian woman holds up a pamphlet with guidance on how to prevent the Ebola virus from spreading, in the city of Monrovia, Liberia, Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014. Liberian officials faced a difficult choice Thursday: deciding which handful of Ebola patients will receive an experimental drug that could prove life-saving, ineffective or even harmful. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)

The Ebola outbreak that has killed more than 1,100 people in West Africa could last another six months, the Doctors Without Borders charity group said yesterday. One aid worker acknowledged that the true death toll is still unknown.

New figures released by the World Health Organization showed that Liberia has recorded more Ebola deaths – 413 – than any of the other affected countries.

Tarnue Karbbar, who works for the aid group Plan International in northern Liberia, said response teams simply aren’t able to document all the erupting Ebola cases. Many of the sick are still being hidden at home by their relatives, who are too fearful of going to an Ebola treatment center.

Others are being buried before the teams can get to remote areas, he said. In the last several days, about 75 cases have emerged in Voinjama, a single Liberian district.

“Our challenge now is to quarantine the area (in Voinjama) to successfully break the transmission,” he said.

There is no cure or licensed treatment for Ebola, and patients often die gruesome deaths with external bleeding from their mouths, eyes or ears. The killer virus is transmitted through bodily fluids like blood, sweat, urine and diarrhea. A handful of people have received an experimental drug whose effectiveness is unknown.

Liberia’s assistant health minister, Tolbert Nyenswah, said three people in Liberia were receiving the ZMapp yesterday. Previously, only two Americans and a Spaniard had gotten it. The Americans are improving, but it is not known what role ZMapp played. The Spaniard died.

The American doctor infected with Ebola while working in Liberia said yesterday he is “recovering in every way” and holding onto the hope of a reunion with his family.

Dr. Kent Brantly remained hospitalized yesterday at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. His comments came in a statement issued through the Christian aid group Samaritan’s Purse.

The World Health Organization has approved the use of such untested drugs but their supply is extremely limited.

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