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Residents of Ferguson struggling with daily life

  • In this photo made Aug. 20, 2014, Kris Holt, 24, poses for a photo near the site where 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Mo. Holt says life has been a struggle since the shooting, with heavy police presence and protests making it hard to come home from work at night. (AP Photo/Ryan J. Foley)

    In this photo made Aug. 20, 2014, Kris Holt, 24, poses for a photo near the site where 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Mo. Holt says life has been a struggle since the shooting, with heavy police presence and protests making it hard to come home from work at night. (AP Photo/Ryan J. Foley)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2014 file photo, people march to protest the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. Residents who live near where Brown was shot say their lives have been upended both by protestors and the police and they wonder what will be left when the national spotlight has moved on. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

    FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2014 file photo, people march to protest the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. Residents who live near where Brown was shot say their lives have been upended both by protestors and the police and they wonder what will be left when the national spotlight has moved on. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2014 file photo, police stand watch in front of a market in Ferguson, Mo. Life in this working-class St. Louis suburb of modest brick homes and low-rise apartments hasn’t been the same since the shooting of Michael Brown by police. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

    FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2014 file photo, police stand watch in front of a market in Ferguson, Mo. Life in this working-class St. Louis suburb of modest brick homes and low-rise apartments hasn’t been the same since the shooting of Michael Brown by police. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2014 file photo, people hold hands in prayer on in the parking lot of convenience store that was looted and burned after Michael Brown was shot by police in Ferguson, Mo. For residents, life in the working-class St. Louis suburb of Ferguson hasn’t been the same the shooting of Michael Brown. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

    FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2014 file photo, people hold hands in prayer on in the parking lot of convenience store that was looted and burned after Michael Brown was shot by police in Ferguson, Mo. For residents, life in the working-class St. Louis suburb of Ferguson hasn’t been the same the shooting of Michael Brown. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

  • FILE - In this In this Aug. 19, 2014 file photo, people watch protesters from inside a restaurant during a rally for Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. The response to Brown’s death turned violent because of a convergence of factors and has upended life in this working-class St. Louis suburb of modest brick homes and low-rise apartments. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

    FILE - In this In this Aug. 19, 2014 file photo, people watch protesters from inside a restaurant during a rally for Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. The response to Brown’s death turned violent because of a convergence of factors and has upended life in this working-class St. Louis suburb of modest brick homes and low-rise apartments. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2014 file photo, police wait to advance after tear gas was used to disperse a crowd during a protest for Michael Brown, who was killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Mo. Since the shooting, many residents have been afraid to leave their homes at night as protesters clash with police in sometimes violent confrontations. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

    FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2014 file photo, police wait to advance after tear gas was used to disperse a crowd during a protest for Michael Brown, who was killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Mo. Since the shooting, many residents have been afraid to leave their homes at night as protesters clash with police in sometimes violent confrontations. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 18, 2014 file photo, a little girl holds a rose as she marches with protesters in Ferguson, Mo. The Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown by police touched off rancorous protests in the St. Louis suburb where police have used riot gear and tear gas to disperse crowds turning daily life on its head. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)

    FILE - In this Aug. 18, 2014 file photo, a little girl holds a rose as she marches with protesters in Ferguson, Mo. The Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown by police touched off rancorous protests in the St. Louis suburb where police have used riot gear and tear gas to disperse crowds turning daily life on its head. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 18, 2014 file photo, a young boy tosses a football as people walk past a business boarded up to protect against looting in Ferguson, Mo. Many of the shops along West Florrissant Avenue are boarded up to prevent looting and close early, if they open at all, following the shooting of Michael Brown by police. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)

    FILE - In this Aug. 18, 2014 file photo, a young boy tosses a football as people walk past a business boarded up to protect against looting in Ferguson, Mo. Many of the shops along West Florrissant Avenue are boarded up to prevent looting and close early, if they open at all, following the shooting of Michael Brown by police. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2014 file photo, children watch from their home as people march to protest the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. Many residents of the St. Louis suburb have said they feel like they are living in a war zone following the shooting of Michael Brown by police. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

    FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2014 file photo, children watch from their home as people march to protest the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. Many residents of the St. Louis suburb have said they feel like they are living in a war zone following the shooting of Michael Brown by police. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

  • In this photo made Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014, Angelia Dickens, 55, poses for a photo on Canfield Drive in Ferguson, Mo. The area has been the site of unrest since the Aug. 9 police shooting of unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown. Dickens says she's been unable to work her night job because of street closures and is ready for the chaos to "die down." (AP Photo/Ryan J. Foley)

    In this photo made Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014, Angelia Dickens, 55, poses for a photo on Canfield Drive in Ferguson, Mo. The area has been the site of unrest since the Aug. 9 police shooting of unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown. Dickens says she's been unable to work her night job because of street closures and is ready for the chaos to "die down." (AP Photo/Ryan J. Foley)

  • In this photo made Aug. 20, 2014, Kris Holt, 24, poses for a photo near the site where 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Mo. Holt says life has been a struggle since the shooting, with heavy police presence and protests making it hard to come home from work at night. (AP Photo/Ryan J. Foley)
  • FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2014 file photo, people march to protest the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. Residents who live near where Brown was shot say their lives have been upended both by protestors and the police and they wonder what will be left when the national spotlight has moved on. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
  • FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2014 file photo, police stand watch in front of a market in Ferguson, Mo. Life in this working-class St. Louis suburb of modest brick homes and low-rise apartments hasn’t been the same since the shooting of Michael Brown by police. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
  • FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2014 file photo, people hold hands in prayer on in the parking lot of convenience store that was looted and burned after Michael Brown was shot by police in Ferguson, Mo. For residents, life in the working-class St. Louis suburb of Ferguson hasn’t been the same the shooting of Michael Brown. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
  • FILE - In this In this Aug. 19, 2014 file photo, people watch protesters from inside a restaurant during a rally for Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. The response to Brown’s death turned violent because of a convergence of factors and has upended life in this working-class St. Louis suburb of modest brick homes and low-rise apartments. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
  • FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2014 file photo, police wait to advance after tear gas was used to disperse a crowd during a protest for Michael Brown, who was killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Mo. Since the shooting, many residents have been afraid to leave their homes at night as protesters clash with police in sometimes violent confrontations. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
  • FILE - In this Aug. 18, 2014 file photo, a little girl holds a rose as she marches with protesters in Ferguson, Mo. The Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown by police touched off rancorous protests in the St. Louis suburb where police have used riot gear and tear gas to disperse crowds turning daily life on its head. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)
  • FILE - In this Aug. 18, 2014 file photo, a young boy tosses a football as people walk past a business boarded up to protect against looting in Ferguson, Mo. Many of the shops along West Florrissant Avenue are boarded up to prevent looting and close early, if they open at all, following the shooting of Michael Brown by police. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)
  • FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2014 file photo, children watch from their home as people march to protest the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. Many residents of the St. Louis suburb have said they feel like they are living in a war zone following the shooting of Michael Brown by police. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
  • In this photo made Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014, Angelia Dickens, 55, poses for a photo on Canfield Drive in Ferguson, Mo. The area has been the site of unrest since the Aug. 9 police shooting of unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown. Dickens says she's been unable to work her night job because of street closures and is ready for the chaos to "die down." (AP Photo/Ryan J. Foley)

Life in Ferguson, Mo., a working-class St. Louis suburb of modest brick homes and low-rise apartments, hasn’t been the same since Angelia Dickens’s son tearfully told her, “The police shot a boy.”

Since that news two weeks ago, she has been afraid to leave her apartment at night as protesters clash with the police in sometimes violent confrontations. She’s stopped going to her job at a call center after it took two hours to navigate police barricades and street closings to get home.

Walking down Canfield Drive, Dickens looks right and sees Missouri state troopers assembled outside a boarded-up barbecue joint. She looks left and sees media satellite trucks. Ahead, volunteers pick up trash along the commercial district where throngs gather nightly to protest the shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown by a white officer.

For the rest of the nation, this is the setting for seeing the angry tensions between young African-Americans and white police officers in predominantly black neighborhoods. Protesters and reporters have flocked to Ferguson from across the nation.

But for residents, it’s also the place they live. They’re struggling over how to do that, no matter how strongly they feel about the issues being fought over.

“Hopefully I can get up Monday and start a fresh week at work,” said Dickens, 55, who’s turning to charities for help paying her rent and utilities this month. “I’m hoping all this can die down and I can go back on with my life.”

The protests have been peaceful for the last three nights, trading confrontations with police for one-on-one talks with officers about Brown’s death and tactics used during previous demonstrations.

But there’s no question that the lives of the people who live near where Brown was shot Aug. 9 have been upended by the protesters and the police, and they wonder how much of the disruption will be temporary. Their closest gas station was burned down during looting. Several stores were damaged. Many of the barbershops and restaurants along West Florissant Avenue commercial strip are boarded up to prevent looting.

Dellena Jones hasn’t seen customers at her hair salon shop, where the glass door was shattered by a concrete block.

“If we keep doing this, we are part of the terror,” said Jones, 35.

But elsewhere in Ferguson, a suburb of 21,000 where “I Love Ferguson” yard signs are common, signs of unrest are rare.

The city is the “small, relatively quiet community” about 10 miles from downtown St. Louis where 69-year-old retired social worker Carolyn Jennings moved 30 years ago. Her neighborhood was mostly white then. Now, it’s almost all black, with only a few elderly whites left. Amid the closing of manufacturing plants and decline of property values, white residents moved to more distant suburbs.

These days, Jennings sits near City Hall holding a sign that reads, “Execution by Ferguson police is penalty for walking while black.” All day, drivers honk in support of protesters calling for the arrest of officer Darren Wilson.

Lt. Jeff Fuesting of the St. Louis County Police Department says officers will have to find a way forward with residents who were sympathetic with the protests and were subjected to tear gas in the demonstrations.

“It’s too early to tell how we’ll do that,” he said.

Karon Johnson, 22, moved into a Canfield Green apartment Aug. 5 with his pregnant girlfriend and 14-month-old son, hoping it would be safer than their previous neighborhood. His girlfriend gave birth to a girl the day before Brown was killed in the street, and they returned home days later to what felt like a war zone.

“Helicopters overhead. Police everywhere,” Johnson said, strolling his son. Now his concern is getting the dishwashing job he was interviewing for at Red Lobster. “$11 an hour,” he said.

Angela Shaver, 46, a Missouri Department of Social Services case worker who’s lived in the neighborhood 20 years, normally works with needy and disabled residents who apply for food stamps and Medicaid. She said she has been on stress leave since the shooting, which was close enough to her apartment that she heard the shots.

She’s started writing a journal to channel her anxieties at a counselor’s suggestion.

“I could write a book,” she laughs.

One evening, she looked out her window and saw so much smoke that she thought her building was on fire. After she went outside, she realized it was tear gas coming from blocks away. The next day she couldn’t swallow, her throat raw.

Kris Holt, a 24-year-old rental car business employee, said he supports the protests, but worries they will “create some bitterness” with residents if they continue much longer. He and his wife had to sleep on his parents’ couch one night this week after being unable to make it through police barricades to get home.

“I care about Michael Brown,” Kris Holt said, “but I still have to live.”

Give it up. If the media will stop fanning the flames, eventually the race-baiters will give up and go home. Can't raise any more money or get any more publicity here. BTW: Why is it when a white cop shoots a black guy it's a big deal, with the media hype, riots and the parade of usual leftist politicians and phoney clergy parading around for weeks, but if a black cop shoots a white guy, life gets back to normal in a day or two and no one cares?

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