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Republicans question security in immigration bill

FILE - In this April 18, 2013 file photo, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., center, and others Senators, participate in a news conference on immigration on Capitol Hill in Washington. From left are, Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., Rubio, Senate Majority Whip Richard Durbin of Ill., and Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J.   One of the legislation’s authors, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., has already acknowledged that the bill will face a tough road to passage if the border security elements are not improved. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

FILE - In this April 18, 2013 file photo, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., center, and others Senators, participate in a news conference on immigration on Capitol Hill in Washington. From left are, Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., Rubio, Senate Majority Whip Richard Durbin of Ill., and Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J. One of the legislation’s authors, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., has already acknowledged that the bill will face a tough road to passage if the border security elements are not improved. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

Republican senators criticized border security provisions in a new immigration bill yesterday, arguing that the landmark legislation can’t pass Congress unless the measures are strengthened.

“If in fact the American people can’t trust that the border is controlled, you’re not going to be able to pass this bill,” said Sen. Tom Coburn of Oklahoma, top Republican on the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee. “You’re going to have to do a lot more on border control.”

Republican Sens. Rand Paul of Kentucky and Ron Johnson of Wisconsin voiced similar concerns at a committee hearing to examine border security provisions of the bill, which is to face its first votes tomorrow before a different panel, the Judiciary Committee. Amendments are expected to be offered during the Judiciary session to boost the border provisions of the bill, which was introduced last month by four Democratic and four Republican senators.

One of the legislation’s authors, Sen. Marco Rubio, a Florida Republican, has already acknowledged that the bill will face a tough road to passage if the border security elements are not improved.

Paul, a Tea Party favorite who’s voiced support for a comprehensive immigration overhaul, insisted his goal in raising questions about the bill is to make it better so it can pass not just the Democratic-controlled Senate but also the Republican-run House. He denied that he’s out to oppose the bill or slow it down.

“I want to be constructive in making the bill strong enough that conservatives . . . will vote for it,” Paul said.

“If it’s not any stronger than this I don’t see it getting through the House,” he said.

Echoing concerns raised by a number of Republicans, Paul said that the bill relies too much on setting goals and requiring studies about border security, instead of insisting on actual accomplishments. Under the bill, “You have to have a plan to build a fence, but you don’t have to build a fence,” he complained.

The bill allocates $5.5 billion for border measures aimed at achieving 100 percent surveillance of the entire border and blocking 90 percent of border crossers and would-be crossers in high-entrance areas.

The Homeland Security Department would have six months to create a new border security plan to achieve the 90 percent effectiveness rate. Also within six months, the department would have to create a plan to identify where new fencing is needed. Once that happens, people living here illegally could begin to apply for a provisional legal status.

Legacy Comments2

As usual from the politicians, feel good plans and more money for their districts. In the real world one would FIRST ask, why do people come here illegally. Some to commit crimes which will never stop, but the vast majority are here for jobs (money). There are laws in place not to hire undocumented aliens but no one enforces them. Why is it that everyone can name the jobs that are being done but no police or agency can find them. Make the law saying companies must check the documentation. Require a birth certificate to enroll a child in public schools. If they are here “legally” they should have no problem showing the documentation they asked for to enter and work in the US. Remove the goals, make the penalties high enough with enforcement and the problem solves itself.

An exhaustive study by the Heritage Foundation has found that after amnesty, current unlawful immigrants would receive $9.4 trillion in government benefits

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