Cloudy
54°
Cloudy
Hi 57° | Lo 45°

Face-chewing victim recovering, strumming guitar

  • Doctor Urmen Desai, left, talks to reporters as Dr. Wrood M. Kassira, center, and Dr. Renaud Saint-Vil, right, look on during a news conference in Miami, Tuesday, May 21, 2013. The doctors gave an an update on the progress of Ronald Poppo, a homeless man whose face was mostly chewed off in a bizarre attack last year in Miami. The attack left Poppo blind, but the doctors say he's been working with an occupational therapist to learn how to take care of himself. The doctors say Poppo also has learned to play guitar and practices daily. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

    Doctor Urmen Desai, left, talks to reporters as Dr. Wrood M. Kassira, center, and Dr. Renaud Saint-Vil, right, look on during a news conference in Miami, Tuesday, May 21, 2013. The doctors gave an an update on the progress of Ronald Poppo, a homeless man whose face was mostly chewed off in a bizarre attack last year in Miami. The attack left Poppo blind, but the doctors say he's been working with an occupational therapist to learn how to take care of himself. The doctors say Poppo also has learned to play guitar and practices daily. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

  • EDS NOTE: GRAPHIC CONTENT - In this undated photo provided by Jackson Health System, Ronald Poppo, a homeless man whose face was mostly chewed off in a bizarre attack last year in Miami, plays the guitar in his room at Jackson Memorial Perdue Medical Center in Cutler Bay, Fla. The attack left Poppo blind, but doctors say he's been working with an occupational therapist to learn how to take care of himself. The doctors say Poppo also has learned to play guitar and practices daily. (AP Photo/Jackson Health System)

    EDS NOTE: GRAPHIC CONTENT - In this undated photo provided by Jackson Health System, Ronald Poppo, a homeless man whose face was mostly chewed off in a bizarre attack last year in Miami, plays the guitar in his room at Jackson Memorial Perdue Medical Center in Cutler Bay, Fla. The attack left Poppo blind, but doctors say he's been working with an occupational therapist to learn how to take care of himself. The doctors say Poppo also has learned to play guitar and practices daily. (AP Photo/Jackson Health System)

  • Doctor Urmen Desai, left, talks to reporters as Dr. Wrood M. Kassira, center, and Dr. Renaud Saint-Vil, right, look on during a news conference in Miami, Tuesday, May 21, 2013. The doctors gave an an update on the progress of Ronald Poppo, a homeless man whose face was mostly chewed off in a bizarre attack last year in Miami. The attack left Poppo blind, but the doctors say he's been working with an occupational therapist to learn how to take care of himself. The doctors say Poppo also has learned to play guitar and practices daily. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)
  • EDS NOTE: GRAPHIC CONTENT - In this undated photo provided by Jackson Health System, Ronald Poppo, a homeless man whose face was mostly chewed off in a bizarre attack last year in Miami, plays the guitar in his room at Jackson Memorial Perdue Medical Center in Cutler Bay, Fla. The attack left Poppo blind, but doctors say he's been working with an occupational therapist to learn how to take care of himself. The doctors say Poppo also has learned to play guitar and practices daily. (AP Photo/Jackson Health System)

A homeless man whose face was mostly chewed off in a bizarre attack last year appeared yesterday to be mostly at peace with his disfigurement, strumming a guitar, making jokes and thanking people for their donations to help pay for his care.

Ronald Poppo doesn’t like to leave his hospital room, though, and he won’t allow anyone to visit him, other than his doctors and nurses. “My face,” he said.

Poppo lost his left eye, his nose and most of the surrounding skin when a naked man attacked him for no reason alongside a Miami highway a year ago.

In a video posted online yesterday by the hospital caring for him, his left eye socket is a hollow shadow, his blinded right eye is covered by a skin graft and his nose is reduced to just the nostrils.

“People in my predicament need to be helped out, and I’m sure there’s other people also that have the same type of predicament. I thank the outpouring of people in the community, I’ll always be grateful for that,” Poppo said in the brief video.

The Associated Press

Legacy Comments0
There are no comments yet. Be the first!
Post a Comment

You must be registered to comment on stories. Click here to register.