P/cloudy
58°
P/cloudy
Hi 70° | Lo 42°

Fort Hood gunman Nidal Hasan won’t call witnesses, testify

  • FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Bell County Sheriff's Department shows Maj. Nidal Hasan. Hasan has been convicted of murder for the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood that killed 13 people and wounded more than 30 others. Hasan and many of his victims seem to want the same thing - his death. But while survivors and relatives of the dead view lethal injection as justice, the Army psychiatrist appears to see it as something else - martyrdom. (AP Photo/Bell County Sheriff's Department, File)

    FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Bell County Sheriff's Department shows Maj. Nidal Hasan. Hasan has been convicted of murder for the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood that killed 13 people and wounded more than 30 others. Hasan and many of his victims seem to want the same thing - his death. But while survivors and relatives of the dead view lethal injection as justice, the Army psychiatrist appears to see it as something else - martyrdom. (AP Photo/Bell County Sheriff's Department, File)

  • Randy Royer, who was shot twice during the Fort Hood shootings, is depicted in a courtroom sketch at the Lawrence William Judicial Center during the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Brigitte Woosley)

    Randy Royer, who was shot twice during the Fort Hood shootings, is depicted in a courtroom sketch at the Lawrence William Judicial Center during the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Brigitte Woosley)

  • CORRECTS BYLINE TO BRIGITTE WOOSLEY INSTEAD OF ERIC GAY - Randy Royer, who was shot twice during the Fort Hood shootings, is depicted in a courtroom sketch at the Lawrence William Judicial Center during the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Brigitte Woosley)

    CORRECTS BYLINE TO BRIGITTE WOOSLEY INSTEAD OF ERIC GAY - Randy Royer, who was shot twice during the Fort Hood shootings, is depicted in a courtroom sketch at the Lawrence William Judicial Center during the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Brigitte Woosley)

  • A driver gets the thumbs-up at a security checkpoint to enter the Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan continues, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    A driver gets the thumbs-up at a security checkpoint to enter the Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan continues, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

  • A mirror is used on a vehicle at a security checkpoint to enter the Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan continues, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    A mirror is used on a vehicle at a security checkpoint to enter the Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan continues, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

  • An armed guard walks around the fortified Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan continues, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    An armed guard walks around the fortified Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan continues, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

  • An armed guard walks around the fortified Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan continues, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    An armed guard walks around the fortified Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan continues, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

  • A mirror is used on a vehicle at a checkpoint to enter the Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan begins, Monday, Aug. 26, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan, who was convicted of killing 13 people in the November 2009 attack at Ford Hood, faces the death penalty as the sentencing phase of his trial begins Monday. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    A mirror is used on a vehicle at a checkpoint to enter the Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan begins, Monday, Aug. 26, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan, who was convicted of killing 13 people in the November 2009 attack at Ford Hood, faces the death penalty as the sentencing phase of his trial begins Monday. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

  • A mirror is used on a vehicle at a security checkpoint to enter the Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan continues, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    A mirror is used on a vehicle at a security checkpoint to enter the Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan continues, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

  • A mirror is used on a vehicle at a checkpoint to enter the Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan begins, Monday, Aug. 26, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan, who was convicted of killing 13 people in the November 2009 attack at Ford Hood, faces the death penalty as the sentencing phase of his trial begins Monday. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    A mirror is used on a vehicle at a checkpoint to enter the Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan begins, Monday, Aug. 26, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan, who was convicted of killing 13 people in the November 2009 attack at Ford Hood, faces the death penalty as the sentencing phase of his trial begins Monday. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

  • Defense attorney Lt. Col. Kris Poppe arrives at the Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan continues, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    Defense attorney Lt. Col. Kris Poppe arrives at the Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan continues, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

  • Military personnel enter the fortified  Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan begins, Monday, Aug. 26, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan, who was convicted of killing 13 people in the November 2009 attack at Ford Hood, faces the death penalty as the sentencing phase of his trial begins Monday. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    Military personnel enter the fortified Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan begins, Monday, Aug. 26, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan, who was convicted of killing 13 people in the November 2009 attack at Ford Hood, faces the death penalty as the sentencing phase of his trial begins Monday. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

  • In this courtroom sketch, Maj. Nidal Hasan, right, appears at the Lawrence William Judicial Center during the sentencing phase of his trial, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. The jury found Hasan unanimously guilty on the 13 charges of premeditated murder in the 2009 Fort Hood shooting, and he is eligible for the death penalty. (AP Photo/Brigitte Woosley)

    In this courtroom sketch, Maj. Nidal Hasan, right, appears at the Lawrence William Judicial Center during the sentencing phase of his trial, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. The jury found Hasan unanimously guilty on the 13 charges of premeditated murder in the 2009 Fort Hood shooting, and he is eligible for the death penalty. (AP Photo/Brigitte Woosley)

  • FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Bell County Sheriff's Department shows Maj. Nidal Hasan. Hasan has been convicted of murder for the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood that killed 13 people and wounded more than 30 others. Hasan and many of his victims seem to want the same thing - his death. But while survivors and relatives of the dead view lethal injection as justice, the Army psychiatrist appears to see it as something else - martyrdom. (AP Photo/Bell County Sheriff's Department, File)
  • Randy Royer, who was shot twice during the Fort Hood shootings, is depicted in a courtroom sketch at the Lawrence William Judicial Center during the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Brigitte Woosley)
  • CORRECTS BYLINE TO BRIGITTE WOOSLEY INSTEAD OF ERIC GAY - Randy Royer, who was shot twice during the Fort Hood shootings, is depicted in a courtroom sketch at the Lawrence William Judicial Center during the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Brigitte Woosley)
  • A driver gets the thumbs-up at a security checkpoint to enter the Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan continues, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
  • A mirror is used on a vehicle at a security checkpoint to enter the Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan continues, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
  • An armed guard walks around the fortified Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan continues, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
  • An armed guard walks around the fortified Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan continues, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
  • A mirror is used on a vehicle at a checkpoint to enter the Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan begins, Monday, Aug. 26, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan, who was convicted of killing 13 people in the November 2009 attack at Ford Hood, faces the death penalty as the sentencing phase of his trial begins Monday. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
  • A mirror is used on a vehicle at a security checkpoint to enter the Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan continues, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
  • A mirror is used on a vehicle at a checkpoint to enter the Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan begins, Monday, Aug. 26, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan, who was convicted of killing 13 people in the November 2009 attack at Ford Hood, faces the death penalty as the sentencing phase of his trial begins Monday. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
  • Defense attorney Lt. Col. Kris Poppe arrives at the Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan continues, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan was convicted of killing 13 of his unarmed comrades in the deadliest attack ever on a U.S. military base. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
  • Military personnel enter the fortified  Lawrence William Judicial Center as the sentencing phase for Maj. Nidal Hasan begins, Monday, Aug. 26, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan, who was convicted of killing 13 people in the November 2009 attack at Ford Hood, faces the death penalty as the sentencing phase of his trial begins Monday. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
  • In this courtroom sketch, Maj. Nidal Hasan, right, appears at the Lawrence William Judicial Center during the sentencing phase of his trial, Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. The jury found Hasan unanimously guilty on the 13 charges of premeditated murder in the 2009 Fort Hood shooting, and he is eligible for the death penalty. (AP Photo/Brigitte Woosley)

The Army psychiatrist who fatally shot 13 people at Fort Hood decided not to present any evidence during his trial’s penalty phase yesterday even though jurors are deciding whether to sentence him to death.

Maj. Nidal Hasan rested his case without calling witnesses or testifying to counter the emotional testimony from victims’ relatives, who talked of eerily quiet homes, lost futures, alcoholism and the unmatched fear of hearing a knock on their front door.

Prosecutors hope the testimony helps persuade jurors to hand down a rare military death sentence against Hasan, who was convicted last week for the 2009 attack that also wounded more than 30 people at the Texas military base.

The judge dismissed jurors after Hasan declined to put up a defense. But after the jury left the courtroom, she asked Hasan more than two dozen questions in rapid fire, affirming that he knew what he was doing. His answers were succinct and just as rapid.

“It is my personal decision,” he said. “It is free and voluntary.”

The judge, Col. Tara Osborn, then read aloud several court opinions to back up her decision not to introduce evidence in Hasan’s favor on her own.

“In other words, Maj. Hasan, you are the captain of your own ship,” Osborn said.

Closing arguments are scheduled for today, but whether jurors will hear from Hasan remains unclear. He has been acting as his own attorney but has put up nearly no defense since his trial began three weeks ago.

The trial’s penalty phase, however, is Hasan’s last chance to tell jurors what he’s spent the last four years telling the military, judges and journalists: that he believes the killing of unarmed American soldiers preparing to deploy to Iraq and Afghanistan was necessary to protect Muslim insurgents. He was barred ahead of trial of making such a defense.

Hasan rested his case shortly after more than a dozen widows, mothers, fathers, children and other relatives of those killed, along with soldiers wounded during the shooting rampage, testified about their lives since Nov. 5, 2009.

Sheryll Pearson sobbed when shown a photo of her son, Pfc. Michael Pearson, hugging her during his graduation.

“We always wanted to see who he was going to become. Now that was taken away from us,” she said.

Teena Nemelka lost the youngest of her four children, Pfc. Aaron Nemelka, whom she called, “my baby.” She talked about her frantic searches for information in the moments after learning about the shooting and about her fear of hearing a knock at the front door of her home.

“You just freeze,” she said. “You don’t want to open that door.”

But the knock came, with “the worst news you could ever hear.”

Joleen Cahill told jurors that she misses hearing her husband’s footsteps in their Texas home, which she said now feels empty. Witnesses have said her husband, Michael Cahill, was armed only with a chair when he tried to charge Hasan as Hasan opened fire on unarmed soldiers inside a crowded medical building at Fort Hood.

The 62-year-old physician’s assistant was the only civilian killed in the attack.

“One of the hardest things was being alone for first time in 60 years of my life. No one to come home to at night. No conversation. We loved to talk politics,” she said.

Philip Warman said the slaying of his wife, Lt. Col. Juanita Warman, “was like I had something ripped out of me.”

“I pretty much drank until the following June,” he said.

Don't forget we have to call it "work place violence" - Obama wont allow us to call it what it was ........ more Muslim terrorism

Post a Comment

You must be registered to comment on stories. Click here to register.