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Nation & world briefs, Aug. 28

Some schools quit healthy lunch program

After just one year, some schools across the country are dropping out of the healthier new federal lunch program, complaining that so many students turned up their noses at meals packed with whole grains, fruits and vegetables that the cafeterias were losing money.

Federal officials said they don’t have exact numbers but have seen isolated reports of schools cutting ties with the $11 billion National School Lunch Program, which reimburses schools for meals served and gives them access to lower-priced food.

Districts that rejected the program said the reimbursement was not enough to offset losses from students who began avoiding the lunch line and bringing food from home or, in some cases, going hungry.

Massachusetts

New photos emerge of Marathon suspect

Dramatic new photos show the Boston Marathon bombing suspect, his face bloodied, climbing out of a boat in a suburban backyard as heavily armed police officers wait for him to drop to the ground.

The images were among those a state police officer provided last month to Boston Magazine, which published some then and more yesterday.

Sgt. Sean Murphy took photos the April night the police cornered Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in a dry-docked boat in Watertown, Mass., just outside Boston.

The new photos include more shots of Tsarnaev coming out of the boat, his head bloody and a red laser trained on his head. They also show him dropping to the ground, where officers and medical personnel rushed to treat him.

Officials ID shipwreck off New Jersey coast

The hulking wreck has been a regular destination for divers but a riddle to historians: What ship came to rest in 85 feet of water 10 miles off New Jersey’s coastline?

Now, federal officials have an answer.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced yesterday that it has confirmed that the ship is the Robert J. Walker, an iron-hulled steamer doing mapping work for the U.S. Coast Survey that sank 153 years ago after a violent collision with a 250-ton schooner.

Twenty sailors aboard the Walker died, making it the worst accident in the history of the U.S. Coast Survey or its successor, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The wreck was discovered by fishermen in the 1970s but its identity was a mystery until June.

The Associated Press

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