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GED test overhauled; some states opt for new exam

  • FILE - This Oct. 11, 2012 file photo shows Pilar Quinn, a volunteer, teaching a GED preparation class at Marist School in Atlanta, Ga. The GED test, the high school equivalency exam, is about to undergo some changes. On Thursday, Jan 2, 2014, an upgraded GED exam and two new competing equivalency tests offered in several states will usher in a new era in adult education testing. (AP Photo/Rebecca Breyer, File)

    FILE - This Oct. 11, 2012 file photo shows Pilar Quinn, a volunteer, teaching a GED preparation class at Marist School in Atlanta, Ga. The GED test, the high school equivalency exam, is about to undergo some changes. On Thursday, Jan 2, 2014, an upgraded GED exam and two new competing equivalency tests offered in several states will usher in a new era in adult education testing. (AP Photo/Rebecca Breyer, File)

  •  FILE - This Dec. 11, 2013 file photo shows Sally Raftery, program coordinator and GED examiner at Bellevue College, holding a booklet for the math portion of the Washington GED test as she poses for a photo in the college's testing center in Bellevue, Wash. The GED test, for decades the brand name for the high school equivalency exam, is about to undergo some changes. On Thursday, Jan 2, 2013, an upgraded GED exam and two new competing equivalency tests offered in several states will usher in a new era in adult education testing. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)

    FILE - This Dec. 11, 2013 file photo shows Sally Raftery, program coordinator and GED examiner at Bellevue College, holding a booklet for the math portion of the Washington GED test as she poses for a photo in the college's testing center in Bellevue, Wash. The GED test, for decades the brand name for the high school equivalency exam, is about to undergo some changes. On Thursday, Jan 2, 2013, an upgraded GED exam and two new competing equivalency tests offered in several states will usher in a new era in adult education testing. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)

  • FILE - This Oct. 8, 2013 file photo shows Rick Hohensee of Washington carrying a "Fire Congress" sign near the House steps on Capitol Hill in Washington.  Americans enter 2014 with a profoundly negative view of their government, expressing little hope that elected officials can or will solve the nation’s biggest problems, a new poll finds. Half say America’s system of democracy needs either “a lot of changes” or a complete overhaul, according to the new poll, conducted by the AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Just 1 in 20 says it works well and needs no changes. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci, File)

    FILE - This Oct. 8, 2013 file photo shows Rick Hohensee of Washington carrying a "Fire Congress" sign near the House steps on Capitol Hill in Washington. Americans enter 2014 with a profoundly negative view of their government, expressing little hope that elected officials can or will solve the nation’s biggest problems, a new poll finds. Half say America’s system of democracy needs either “a lot of changes” or a complete overhaul, according to the new poll, conducted by the AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Just 1 in 20 says it works well and needs no changes. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci, File)

  • FILE - This Oct. 11, 2012 file photo shows Pilar Quinn, a volunteer, teaching a GED preparation class at Marist School in Atlanta, Ga. The GED test, the high school equivalency exam, is about to undergo some changes. On Thursday, Jan 2, 2014, an upgraded GED exam and two new competing equivalency tests offered in several states will usher in a new era in adult education testing. (AP Photo/Rebecca Breyer, File)
  •  FILE - This Dec. 11, 2013 file photo shows Sally Raftery, program coordinator and GED examiner at Bellevue College, holding a booklet for the math portion of the Washington GED test as she poses for a photo in the college's testing center in Bellevue, Wash. The GED test, for decades the brand name for the high school equivalency exam, is about to undergo some changes. On Thursday, Jan 2, 2013, an upgraded GED exam and two new competing equivalency tests offered in several states will usher in a new era in adult education testing. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
  • FILE - This Oct. 8, 2013 file photo shows Rick Hohensee of Washington carrying a "Fire Congress" sign near the House steps on Capitol Hill in Washington.  Americans enter 2014 with a profoundly negative view of their government, expressing little hope that elected officials can or will solve the nation’s biggest problems, a new poll finds. Half say America’s system of democracy needs either “a lot of changes” or a complete overhaul, according to the new poll, conducted by the AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Just 1 in 20 says it works well and needs no changes. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci, File)

The GED test, for decades the brand name for the high school equivalency exam, is about to undergo some changes.

Beginning today, an upgraded GED exam and two new competing equivalency tests offered in several states will usher in a new era in adult education testing.

The GED (General Educational Development) exam was created in 1942 to help World War II veterans who dropped out of high school use college benefits offered under the GI Bill. This will be its first face-lift in more than a decade.

The revamped test is intended to be more rigorous and better aligned with the skills needed for college and today’s workplaces. The new test will only be offered on a computer, and it will cost more. What consumers pay for the test varies widely and depends on state assistance and other factors.

Even before its launch, officials in many states have balked at the cost increase and at doing away with paper-and-pencil testing. At least nine states – New York, New Hampshire, Missouri, Iowa, Montana, Indiana, Louisiana, Maine and West Virginia – severed ties with the GED test and adopted one of the two new tests that are entering the market. Three others – Wyoming, New Jersey and Nevada – will offer all three. Tennessee will offer the GED test and one other, and other states are expected to decide what to do in the coming months.

That will leave test takers, adult educators and states grappling with new questions: How do you best prepare students for the tests? Which is best, by price and quality? How will the tests be accepted by the military, employers and colleges?

The advent of new tests has sent thousands of test takers rushing to complete sections of the old test they had left incomplete. Once the upgrade happens, the old scores of “partial passers” will no longer be accepted.

“Angst is the good word” to describe this time in adult education, said Lennox McLendon, executive director of the National Adult Education Professional Development Consortium.

Marty Finsterbusch, president of ValueUSA, a resource organization for adult learners, said he fears there will be a lot of unintended consequences and he’s worried about adult learners “getting caught up in the crunch of this.” For instance, he said, he wonders what will happen to someone who partially passes a test in one state, then moves to another state that doesn’t offer that type of exam.

“The system will work itself out eventually, but how many people are going to get hurt in the meantime?” Finsterbusch said.

More than 700,000 people took the GED test in 2012. The average test taker is about 26, and many people seeking a high school equivalency diploma are poor. Nationally, about 40 million American adults lack a high school education.

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